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The Chosen

Top-Ranked Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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advocate
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
to advocate
Reb Saunders didn't mind his son reading forbidden books, but never would he let his son be the friend of the son of a man who was advocating the establishment of a secular Jewish state run by Jewish goyim.
advocating = recommending
DefinitionGenerally this sense of advocate means:
to recommend or publicly support (someone or something)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 3.13
Web Links
contempt
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
feels contempt towards her
I had never heard that tone of contempt in his voice before.
contempt = disrespect (as though they were not worthy of respect)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of contempt means:
lack of respect for someone or something thought inferior — often accompanied by a feeling of dislike or disgust
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3.17
Web Links
desecrate
3 uses
The leaflets denounced the United Nations vote, ordered Jews to ignore it, called the state a desecration of the name of God,
desecration = violation of the sacred character

(editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
DefinitionGenerally desecrate means:
violate the sacred nature of something
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.1
Web Links
disdain
1 use
The anti-Zionist students remained aloof, bitter, disdainful of our Zionism.
disdainful = full of disrespect
DefinitionGenerally disdain means:
a lack of respect — often suggesting distaste and an undeserved sense of superiority

or:

to reject as not good enough
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 3.13
Web Links
disparage
1 use
I was suddenly a little frightened at the disparaging way I had uttered the word pilpul.
disparaging = critical or making seem less important
DefinitionGenerally disparage means:
to criticize or make seem less important — especially in a disrespectful or contemptuous manner
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 3.14
Web Links
diverse
1 use
Then I would go into the attempt of the late medieval commentary to reconcile the diverse explanations of the commentaries.
diverse = varied (having variety with differences)
DefinitionGenerally diverse means:
varied (having variety amongst things of the same kind) — especially with regard to ideas or members of a population group
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 3.14
Web Links
dubious
1 use
They are interested solely in confirming highly dubious theoretical hypotheses by...
dubious = doubtful (not to be trusted)
DefinitionGenerally dubious means:
doubtful
in various senses, including:
  • doubtful that something should be relied upon — as in "The argument relies on a dubious assumption."
  • doubtful that something is morally proper — as in "The company is accused of using dubious sales practices to influence minors."
  • bad or of questionable value — as in "The state has the dubious distinction of the highest taxes."
  • doubtful or uncertain — as in "She is dubious about making the change."
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 3.13
Web Links
fanatic
11 uses
What annoyed him was their fanatic sense of righteousness, their absolute certainty that they and they alone had God's ear, and every other Jew was wrong,
fanatic = extremely enthusiastic
DefinitionGenerally fanatic means:
a person motivated by extreme enthusiasm (as for a cause) — sometimes to a fault

or:

extremely enthusiastic — sometimes to a fault
Word Statistics
Book11 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.1
Web Links
indifferent
4 uses
It destroys our self-pride, our arrogance, our indifference toward others.
indifference = lack of concern and interest
DefinitionGenerally indifferent means:
without interest
in various senses, including:
  • unconcerned — as in "She is indifferent to what is served to eat."
  • unsympathetic — as in "She is indifferent to his needs."
  • not of good quality (which may imply average or poor quality depending upon context) — as in "an indifferent performance"
  • impartial — as in "We need a judge who is indifferent."
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library15 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 3.13
Web Links
innovate
1 use
But the business about the mistakes I never heard before. That is something new. That is Reb Saunders' innovation.
innovation = introduction of something that is new and different

(editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
DefinitionGenerally innovate means:
bring something new to an environment
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 2.7
Web Links
lament
3 uses
"You could've told me," Schwartzie lamented. "I could've been ready."
lamented = expressed regret
DefinitionGenerally lament means:
to express grief or regret
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 1.1
Web Links
luminous
2 uses
The hydrangea bush—or snowball bush, as we called it—on our lawn glowed in the sunlight, and I stared at it. I had never really paid any attention to it before. Now it seemed suddenly luminous and alive.
luminous = glowing or shining

(also used metaphorically to describe beauty or intelligence)
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.5
Web Links
minute   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 3 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
minute size
He chose a minute aspect of the answer and asked who had dealt with it in an altogether different way, and Danny answered.†
minute = minor
DefinitionGenerally this sense of minute means:
small, exceptionally small, or insignificant
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.6
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
keep the minutes
The meeting had started pleasantly enough with the usual reading of the minutes and committee reports, when Davey Cantor burst into the room, looking as though he was crying, and shouted! breathlessly that someone had just told him President Roosevelt was dead.†
minutes = formal notes
DefinitionGenerally this sense of minutes means:
a written record of what happened at a meeting
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.11
Web Links
pious
3 uses
1  —3 uses as in:
a good, pious woman
the story of an old, pious Hasid who had set out on a journey to Palestine
pious = highly religious
DefinitionGenerally this sense of pious means:
religious or highly moral
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 2.6
Web Links
reconcile
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
reconciled their differences
Then I would go into the attempt of the late medieval commentary to reconcile the diverse explanations of the commentaries.
reconcile = bring into agreement
DefinitionGenerally this sense of reconcile means:
to bring into agreement
The exact meaning of reconcile can depend upon its context. For example:
  • "We reconciled our differences and are on friendly terms now." — settled or found a way to accept
  • "They did break up, but they reconciled since then." — made up
  • "I need to reconcile my goals with my abilities." — make compatible
  • "I need to reconcile my checkbook." — get the checkbook numbers and the bank statement to agree
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 3.14
Web Links
refute
2 uses
They are interested solely in confirming highly dubious theoretical hypotheses ... and make no attempt at refutation
refutation = evidence or argument that something is false

(editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
DefinitionGenerally refute means:
to disprove or argue against
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 3.13
Web Links
resignation
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
accepted it with resignation
A few days after we had resumed talking, Danny told me that he had resigned himself to experimental psychology and was even beginning to enjoy it.
resigned = accepted something undesired as unavoidable or the lesser of evils
DefinitionGenerally this sense of resignation means:
acceptance of something undesired as unavoidable or the lesser of evils
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 3.16
Web Links
revere
2 uses
I didn't mix much with the Hasidim, but the extent to which they revered Danny was obvious to everyone.
revered = regarded with feelings of deep respect and admiration
DefinitionGenerally revere means:
regard with feelings of deep respect and admiration — sometimes with a mixture of wonder and awe or fear
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library11 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 3.14
Web Links
somber
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
a somber mood
He sounded unhappy, and there was a somber look on his face.
somber = serious (without humour or fun—perhaps sad)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of somber means:
serious and without humor or fun — perhaps sad
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3.14
Web Links
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