toggle menu
menu
vocabulary
1000+ books
Book Menu

The Perfect Game

Top-Ranked Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

instructions
admonish
4 uses
"I don't want him to grow soft playing baseball," he admonished.
admonished = expressed disapproval
DefinitionGenerally admonish means:
to express disapproval to someone of their actions; or to warn or advise someone
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 1.4
Web Links
anarchy
2 uses
A revolution swept across Mexico in 1910, precipitating a decade of civil war and anarchy.
anarchy = the complete absence of political authority
DefinitionGenerally anarchy means:
the complete absence of political authority; or more generally, complete absence of order
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 1.3
Web Links
apathy
2 uses
though some in the stands were offended or apathetic, many were touched by the humility of the team's condition and reached into their pockets for coins.
apathetic = without interest
DefinitionGenerally apathy means:
lack of interest and enthusiasm
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.5
Web Links
austere
1 use
Monterrey was a city devoid of material comforts, so it was good that he had chosen a vocation that rewarded austerity.
austerity = self-denial (of luxury and comfort)
DefinitionGenerally austere means:
a notable absence of luxury, comfort, or decoration

or:

of a person:  stern in manner; or practicing great self-denial
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st usePro.
Web Links
candid
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
a candid photograph
She knew it was the kind of candid photo that made magazine covers and won awards.†
candid = unposed
DefinitionGenerally this sense of candid means:
unposed — typically said of a photograph
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 3.24
Web Links
complacent
1 use
Fundidora, was quick to remind complacent or forgetful employees of the fragile demarcation between life and death.
complacent = unworried and satisfied (often to a fault)
DefinitionGenerally complacent means:
contented (unworried and satisfied) — often to a fault
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 1.2
Web Links
diligent
1 use
men of different trades worked diligently, repairing roof rafters, shoring up timbers, chipping away the deteriorated masonry, and cleaning the twisted metal and concrete debris.
diligently = with hard work and care
DefinitionGenerally this sense of diligent means:
hard work and care in tasks — often continuing when others might quit because of difficulties
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 3.20
Web Links
disdain
2 uses
Inside, the clerk eyed him with a mix of disdain and pity.
disdain = contempt (lack of respect)
DefinitionGenerally disdain means:
a lack of respect — often suggesting distaste and an undeserved sense of superiority

or:

to reject as not good enough
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 2.15
Web Links
disparage
1 use
"She could've been looking at a bird behind you, stupid," came Hector's disparaging remark.
disparaging = criticizing
DefinitionGenerally disparage means:
to criticize or make seem less important — especially in a disrespectful or contemptuous manner
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 1.2
Web Links
divine
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
to forgive is divine
The events of a Little League baseball game in Louisville, Kentucky should hardly have merited divine attention, but just as the umpire was about to call the game in Biloxi's favor, an angel's voice interceded.
divine = coming from God
DefinitionGenerally this sense of divine means:
wonderful; or god-like or coming from God
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3.20
Web Links
elicit
7 uses
He shoved the machine, eliciting a stern look from the deputy,
eliciting = bringing out in response
DefinitionGenerally elicit means:
get or bring out in response — such as information or a feeling
Word Statistics
Book7 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.4
Web Links
forfeit
9 uses
Well, they better start now or else they's gonna forfeit,
forfeit = lose the game (as a penalty)
DefinitionGenerally forfeit means:
to lose or surrender something — often as a penalty
Word Statistics
Book9 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.19
Web Links
interject
9 uses
"Umberto, he's just a child," interjected Oralia.
interjected = quickly inserted (typically interrupts what another is saying)
DefinitionGenerally interject means:
to quickly insert a comment that interrupts what another is saying

or more rarely and more generally:  to insert — as in "She interjects religion into politics," or "She interjects herself into my business."
Word Statistics
Book9 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePro.
Web Links
mitigate
1 use
Veterans of the factory knew that these didn't prevent or mitigate the accidents, nor did they protect workers from heat exhaustion or respiratory diseases.
mitigate = make less harmful
DefinitionGenerally mitigate means:
make less harmful or unpleasant
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 1.2
Web Links
pervasive
3 uses
"Maybe it's best this way," Cesar said to Lucky while trying to find something to say to fill the awkward silence that pervaded the wait for news of their disposition.
pervaded = filled
DefinitionGenerally pervasive means:
existing throughout something; or generally widespread
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 2.9
Web Links
pious
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
a good, pious woman
The kind of gut-wrenching event that tested the faith of even the most pious.
pious = religious
DefinitionGenerally this sense of pious means:
religious or highly moral
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st usePro.
Web Links
revere
1 use
Lucky could not resist making a somewhat irreverent reference to Genesis,
irreverent = disrespectful

(Editor's note:  The prefix "ir-" in irreverent means not and reverses the meaning of reverent. This prefix is sometimes used before words beginning with "R" as seen in words like irrational, irregular, and irresistible.)        
DefinitionGenerally revere means:
regard with feelings of deep respect and admiration — sometimes with a mixture of wonder and awe or fear
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library11 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 2.15
Web Links
satiate
1 use
As a waitress in a local restaurant, she was no stranger to making sure customers' appetites were satiated.
satiated = filled to satisfaction
DefinitionGenerally satiate means:
to satisfy a hunger; or fill to satisfaction (typically said of hunger for food, but can be said of anything desired—such as of knowledge or sensual pleasure)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 2.11
Web Links
savor
7 uses
She'd have to savor the moment only in her memory.
savor = relish
DefinitionGenerally savor means:
to take great pleasure from; or the pleasure or flavor enjoyed
Word Statistics
Book7 uses
Library11 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.12
Web Links
scrutiny
1 use
He checked their papers with the scantest of scrutiny.
scrutiny = careful inspection
DefinitionGenerally scrutiny means:
careful examination of something
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library10 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 2.10
Web Links
Go to Book Menu
Take Pre-Reading Quiz
† 
Sample usage followed by this mark was not checked by an editor. Please let us know if you spot a problem.
SAT® is a registered trademark of the College Board, which is not affiliated with verbalworkout.com™, and does not endorse this site.