toggle menu
menu
vocabulary
1000+ books
Book Menu

Inkheart

Top-Ranked Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

instructions
abrupt
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
an abrupt change
Her father turned around so abruptly that the book almost fell from her hand.
abruptly = suddenly and unexpectedly
DefinitionGenerally this sense of abrupt means:
sudden and unexpected
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library15 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
beckon
13 uses
She beckoned to a waitress and asked for more coffee.
beckoned = called (to come by using a hand gesture or a nod)
DefinitionGenerally beckon means:
to call — typically to ask or tell someone to come nearer by using a hand gesture or a nod of the head
Word Statistics
Book13 uses
Library13 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
belligerent
1 use
Belligerent as a bull terrier, she marched up to him.
belligerent = hostile (with the attitude of one eager to fight)
DefinitionGenerally belligerent means:
hostile (the attitude of one eager to fight); or one already engaged in a fight or war
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
conjure
8 uses
Let us use our magic and enchantments to conjure up a woman out of flowers.
conjure = summon into existence by magic
DefinitionGenerally conjure means:
summon into action or bring into existence — often as if by magic
Word Statistics
Book8 uses
Library11 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
contempt
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
feels contempt towards her
Elinor inspected her again, this time with unconcealed contempt.
contempt = lack of respect (as though she was not good enough)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of contempt means:
lack of respect for someone or something thought inferior — often accompanied by a feeling of dislike or disgust
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
desecrate
1 use
She stumbled through her desecrated treasures as if she were wading through a muddy pond, pushed them aside, picked one up and let it drop, staggered on down the long corridor that led to her library.
desecrated = violated or spoiled or disrespected (of things considered sacred)
DefinitionGenerally desecrate means:
violate the sacred nature of something
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
Web Links
discord
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
discordant music
...as if every letter were a musical note and any words spoken without love were a discord in the melody.
discord = unpleasant sound
DefinitionGenerally this sense of discord means:
unpleasant sound — especially a combination of sounds that sound wrong together (though sometimes done intentionally in music)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
Web Links
disdain
1 use
She looked up at the second net with a disdainful expression.
disdainful = full of disrespect
DefinitionGenerally disdain means:
a lack of respect — often suggesting distaste and an undeserved sense of superiority

or:

to reject as not good enough
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
Web Links
gesticulate
1 use
This was the shocking thing; that the slime of the pit seemed to utter cries and voices; that the amorphous dust gesticulated and sinned; that what was dead, and had no shape, should usurp the offices of life.
gesticulated = made gestures (hand or body movements)
DefinitionGenerally gesticulate means:
to make gestures (hand or body movements) while speaking or to express something
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
ignominious
1 use
How ignominious to be strapped to this ponderous mass of paper, print and dead man's sentiment.
ignominious = bringing disgrace or shame
DefinitionGenerally ignominious means:
deserving or bringing disgrace or shame — typically in reference to behavior or character
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
Web Links
incredulous
10 uses
Mo was staring incredulously at the book in Capricorn's hand as if he expected it to dissolve into thin air at any moment.
incredulously = with disbelief; or with difficulty accepting something so unexpected
DefinitionGenerally incredulous means:
unbelieving; or having difficulty accepting something so unexpected
Word Statistics
Book10 uses
Library11 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
Web Links
indifferent
7 uses
...even if he was taking great pains to hide his concern under a mask of indifference.
indifference = lacking concern
DefinitionGenerally indifferent means:
without interest
in various senses, including:
  • unconcerned — as in "She is indifferent to what is served to eat."
  • unsympathetic — as in "She is indifferent to his needs."
  • not of good quality (which may imply average or poor quality depending upon context) — as in "an indifferent performance"
  • impartial — as in "We need a judge who is indifferent."
Word Statistics
Book7 uses
Library15 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
Web Links
indignant
5 uses
He's planning to feed you to his friend like a fly to a frog, so how about a little indignation?
indignation = anger at something unjust or wrong

(editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
DefinitionGenerally indignant means:
angered or annoyed at something unjust or wrong
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library16 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
Web Links
irony
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
situational irony
He tried to sound composed, ironic, like a man amused at some childish prank,
ironic = as though amused that what happened is very different than what might have been expected
DefinitionGenerally this sense of irony means:
when what happens is very different than what might be expected; or when things are together that seem like they don't belong together — especially when amusing or an entertaining coincidence
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library16 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
petulant
1 use
He heard the petulance in his own voice.
petulance = unreasonable annoyance or upset
DefinitionGenerally petulant means:
unreasonably annoyed or upset

or:

easily annoyed or upset
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
Web Links
reproach
5 uses
Elinor cleared her throat and gave Mo a reproachful glance, as if it could only be his fault that his daughter was precocious enough to know such things.
reproachful = critical (full of criticism)
DefinitionGenerally reproach means:
a criticism; or to express criticism — especially where a relationship makes the disapproval result in disappointment or shame
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
Web Links
scorn
17 uses
Dustfinger's voice was full of scorn.
scorn = disrespect
DefinitionGenerally scorn means:
disrespect or reject as not good enough
Word Statistics
Book17 uses
Library10 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
Web Links
scrutiny
12 uses
Meggie scrutinized her father's face.
scrutinized = looked at very carefully

(editor's note:  The suffix "-ive" converts a word to a verb. This is the same pattern you see in words like apologize, theorize, and dramatize.)
DefinitionGenerally scrutiny means:
careful examination of something
Word Statistics
Book12 uses
Library10 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
Web Links
suppress
6 uses
Meggie had to suppress a giggle.
suppress = keep under control
DefinitionGenerally suppress means:
trying to keep under control
The exact meaning of suppress can depend upon its context. For example:
  • "suppressed the revolution" — to stop others from doing something by force
  • "suppressed a smile" — kept something from happening
  • "suppressed the story" — kept news from spreading
  • "suppressed her fear" — controlled an emotion
  • "suppressed the memory" — avoided thinking about (perhaps even removed from conscious memory)
Word Statistics
Book6 uses
Library14 uses in 10 avg bks
Web Links
wretched
14 uses
Does this mean we have to go the whole wretched way on foot again?
wretched = miserable
DefinitionGenerally wretched means:
very bad
in various senses, including:
  • unfortunate or miserable — as in "wretched prisoners sleeping on the cold floor"
  • of poor quality — as in "wretched roads"
  • morally bad — as in "The wretched woman stole his wallet."
Word Statistics
Book14 uses
Library10 uses in 10 avg bks
Go to Book Menu
Take Pre-Reading Quiz
SAT® is a registered trademark of the College Board, which is not affiliated with verbalworkout.com™, and does not endorse this site.