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New Moon

Top-Ranked Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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abrupt
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
an abrupt change
Abruptly, I remembered what had happened to Paris when Romeo came back.
abruptly = suddenly and unexpectedly

(editor's note:  In Romeo and Juliet, Romeo fights with and kills Paris.)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of abrupt means:
sudden and unexpected
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library15 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useEpil.
Web Links
apathy
1 use
Her expression was apathetic.
apathetic = without interest or enthusiasm
DefinitionGenerally apathy means:
lack of interest and enthusiasm
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 21
Web Links
candid
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
a candid photograph
"Sure," she said, grinning, and turned to snap a candid shot of Mike with his mouth full.†
candid = unposed
DefinitionGenerally this sense of candid means:
unposed — typically said of a photograph
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 3
Web Links
complacent
1 use
"You're right," he agreed, still complacent.
complacent = contented (unworried and happy)
DefinitionGenerally complacent means:
contented (unworried and satisfied) — often to a fault
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 15
Web Links
delude
12 uses
as long as I was truly insane now, I might as well enjoy the delusions while they were pleasant.
delusions = false beliefs

(editor's note:  The suffix "-sions", converts a verb into a plural noun that denotes results of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in discussions from discuss, explosions from explode, and revisions from revise.)
DefinitionGenerally delude means:
deceive (convince to have a false belief)
Word Statistics
Book12 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 8
Web Links
dubious
4 uses
She eyed me dubiously.
dubiously = doubtfully or suspiciously
DefinitionGenerally dubious means:
doubtful
in various senses, including:
  • doubtful that something should be relied upon — as in "The argument relies on a dubious assumption."
  • doubtful that something is morally proper — as in "The company is accused of using dubious sales practices to influence minors."
  • bad or of questionable value — as in "The state has the dubious distinction of the highest taxes."
  • doubtful or uncertain — as in "She is dubious about making the change."
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 11
Web Links
endure
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
endured the pain
I had to know that he existed. That was all. Everything else I could endure. So long as he existed.
endure = suffer through
DefinitionGenerally this sense of endure means:
to suffer through (or put up with something difficult or unpleasant)
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library18 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
enigma
1 use
I watched curiously as an enigmatic range of emotions flitted across her face.
enigmatic = mysterious and seeming unexplainable
DefinitionGenerally enigma means:
something mysterious that seems unexplainable
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 17
Web Links
furtive
2 uses
I took advantage of his diversion, taking a furtive step back.
furtive = cautious (or to avoid being seen)
DefinitionGenerally furtive means:
taking pains to avoid being observed

or:

in a manner indicating nervousness (being cautious or appearing suspicious)
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
incredulous
1 use
She twisted in her seat to face me, eyeing me incredulously.
incredulously = with disbelief
DefinitionGenerally incredulous means:
unbelieving; or having difficulty accepting something so unexpected
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library11 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
indifferent
5 uses
Wouldn't Edward, indifferent as he might be, want me to be as happy as possible under the circumstances?
indifferent = without interest
DefinitionGenerally indifferent means:
without interest
in various senses, including:
  • unconcerned — as in "She is indifferent to what is served to eat."
  • unsympathetic — as in "She is indifferent to his needs."
  • not of good quality (which may imply average or poor quality depending upon context) — as in "an indifferent performance"
  • impartial — as in "We need a judge who is indifferent."
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library15 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 3
Web Links
irony
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
situational irony
But it was ironic, all things considered, that, in the end, I would wind up as a zombie. I hadn't seen that one coming.
ironic = when what happens is very different than what might be expected
DefinitionGenerally this sense of irony means:
when what happens is very different than what might be expected; or when things are together that seem like they don't belong together — especially when amusing or an entertaining coincidence
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library16 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
morose
3 uses
I'd been careful to avoid all forms of moroseness, moping included.
moroseness = unhappiness

(Editor's note:  The suffix "-ness" converts an adjective to a noun that means the quality of. This is the same pattern you see in words like darkness, kindness, and coolness.)
DefinitionGenerally morose means:
unhappy — often with a withdrawn personality
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
muse
8 uses
1  —8 uses as in:
her musings
"It's just so difficult to understand, even now," Aro mused,
mused = thought (in this case "out loud")
DefinitionGenerally this sense of muse means:
reflect (think) deeply on a subject — perhaps aloud
Word Statistics
Book8 uses
Library10 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
obscure
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
the view or directions are obscure
I still had a hard time finding the obscure turnoff to his house in the dark.
obscure = not clearly seen
DefinitionGenerally this sense of obscure means:
not clearly seen, understood, or expressed
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
remorse
7 uses
The last thing I wanted was for him to go wallow in remorse.
remorse = regret for doing something that was wrong
DefinitionGenerally remorse means:
a feeling of deep regret for doing something that was wrong
Word Statistics
Book7 uses
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
resignation
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
accepted it with resignation
I nodded, disappointed but resigned.
resigned = having accepted something undesired as unavoidable or the lesser of evils
DefinitionGenerally this sense of resignation means:
acceptance of something undesired as unavoidable or the lesser of evils
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 17
Web Links
scrutiny
5 uses
"Bella," he hesitated, scrutinizing my reaction to his next words.
scrutinizing = careful inspecting

(editor's note:  The suffix "-ive" converts a word to a verb. This is the same pattern you see in words like apologize, theorize, and dramatize.)
DefinitionGenerally scrutiny means:
careful examination of something
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library10 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
serene
7 uses
He struggled to conceal the tension behind his serene expression.
serene = calm and untroubled
Word Statistics
Book7 uses
Library11 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3
Web Links
skeptical
8 uses
I didn't say anything, and he seemed to hear skepticism in my silence.
skepticism = doubt (that something is true)
DefinitionGenerally skeptical means:
doubtful (that something is true or worthwhile)

or more rarely:

generally tending to doubt what others believe
Word Statistics
Book8 uses
Library14 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 8
Web Links
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Sample usage followed by this mark was not checked by an editor. Please let us know if you spot a problem.
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