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Winter Dreams

Top-Ranked Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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abrupt
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
an abrupt change
In April the winter ceased abruptly.
abruptly = suddenly and unexpectedly
From page 1.3  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of abrupt means:
sudden and unexpected
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library15 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1, p.1.3
Web Links
accentuate
3 uses
She wore a blue gingham dress, rimmed at throat and shoulders with a white edging that accentuated her tan.
accentuated = emphasized or drew attention to
From page 5.5  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally accentuate means:
to emphasize or draw attention to — possibly to emphasize by increasing
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2, p.5.5
Web Links
agony
3 uses
She had brought him ecstatic happiness and intolerable agony of spirit.
agony = intense feelings of suffering
From page 11.9  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally agony means:
intense feelings of suffering — can be from mental or physical pain
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library15 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4, p.11.3
Web Links
apprehension
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
apprehension about finals
Dexter waited with no apprehension of what was coming.
apprehension = worry
From page 17.5  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of apprehension means:
worry about what is to come
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 6, p.17.5
Web Links
contempt
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
feels contempt towards her
She had treated him with interest, with encouragement, with malice, with indifference, with contempt.
contempt = disrespect and dislike
From page 11.9  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of contempt means:
lack of respect for someone or something thought inferior — often accompanied by a feeling of dislike or disgust
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2, p.5.9
Web Links
convention
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
conventional behavior
Then a perfect wave of emotion washed over him, carrying off with it a sediment of wisdom, of convention, of doubt, of honor.
convention = what is normal or typical; or a bias in favor of what is normal
From page 15.9  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of convention means:
something regarded as normal or typical
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library11 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 4, p.15.9
Web Links
deliberate
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
deliberate insult
He had heard, of course, that she was married—perhaps deliberately he had heard no more.
deliberately = intentionally
From page 17.6  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of deliberate means:
to do something intentionally (do it on purpose)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 6, p.17.6
Web Links
discretion
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
Parental discretion advised.
She had said, in effect, that she found such a thing impossible to believe, that if it were true he had merely committed a childish indiscretion— and probably to show off.
indiscretion = behavior that displays a lack of good judgment

(Editor's note:  The prefix "in-" in indiscretion means not and reverses the meaning of discretion. This is the same pattern you see in words like invisible, incomplete, and insecure.)
From page 14.8  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of discretion means:
good judgment or good taste
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 4, p.14.8
Web Links
diverge
1 use
There was no divergence of method,
divergence = difference
From page 10.1  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally diverge means:
to move apart; or be or become different
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 4, p.10.1
Web Links
ecstatic
2 uses
She had brought him ecstatic happiness and intolerable agony of spirit.
ecstatic = intense happiness
From page 11.9  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally ecstatic means:
feeling intense happiness and excitement (as when in a state of ecstasy)
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1, p.1.5
Web Links
enumerate
1 use
He told himself the trouble and the pain she had caused him, he enumerated her glaring deficiencies as a wife.
enumerated = to name items individually
From page 12.2  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally enumerate means:
to name items individually (as though making a list); or to count
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 4, p.12.2
Web Links
imply
1 use
the elements of the comedy were implied in the scene,
implied = suggested (said or known indirectly)
From page 3.5  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally imply means:
to suggest or say indirectly — possibly as a logical consequence
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library16 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 10
1st useChapter 1, p.3.5
Web Links
indifferent
3 uses
He was completely indifferent to popular opinion.
indifferent = unconcerned (without interest)
From page 16.4  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally indifferent means:
without interest
in various senses, including:
  • unconcerned — as in "She is indifferent to what is served to eat."
  • unsympathetic — as in "She is indifferent to his needs."
  • not of good quality (which may imply average or poor quality depending upon context) — as in "an indifferent performance"
  • impartial — as in "We need a judge who is indifferent."
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library15 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 4, p.11.9
Web Links
malicious
5 uses
Nor, when he had seen that it was no use, that he did not possess in himself the power to move fundamentally or to hold Judy Jones, did he bear any malice toward her.
malice = desire to see someone suffer
From page 16.5  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally malicious means:
wanting to see others suffer; or threatening evil
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 2, p.5.4
Web Links
melancholy
2 uses
At these times the country gave him a feeling of profound melancholy
melancholy = sadness
From page 1.2  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally melancholy means:
a sad feeling or manner — sometimes thoughtfully sad
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1, p.1.2
Web Links
perturb
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
she was perturbed
But he had received a strong emotional shock, and his perturbation required a violent and immediate outlet.
perturbation = anxiety (uneasiness)

(editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
From page 3.9  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of perturb means:
to disturb in mind or make uneasy
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1, p.3.9
Web Links
petulant
1 use
Whatever petulance she uttered in her throaty voice worried him.
petulance = unreasonable annoyance or upset
From page 8.9  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally petulant means:
unreasonably annoyed or upset

or:

easily annoyed or upset
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 3, p.8.9
Web Links
precarious
3 uses
his father, prospering now, would have paid his way—for the precarious advantage of attending an older and more famous university in the East, where he was bothered by his scanty funds.
precarious = unsure
From page 4.1  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally precarious means:
unsafe or in danger of getting worse — especially in danger of falling
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2, p.4.4
Web Links
resolve
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
How did you resolve the problem?
The situation was resolved by the fortuitous appearance of the caddymaster,
resolved = settled or solved
From page 3.6  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of resolve means:
to solve a problem or settle a disagreement
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 1, p.3.6
Web Links
superficial
1 use
The attitude of the city on his action was of no importance to him, not because he was going to leave the city, but because any outside attitude on the situation seemed superficial.
superficial = relating to a surface rather than to anything deep or penetrating
From page 16.4  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally superficial means:
relating to a surface rather than to anything deep or penetrating (often of injuries or thinking)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 5, p.16.4
Web Links
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