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The ABC Murders

Top-Ranked Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

instructions
accompany
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
accompany on the journey
I was not invited to accompany him on his mysterious comings and goings
accompany = travel along with
DefinitionGenerally this sense of accompany means:
to travel along with
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library9 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 10
1st useChapter 32
Web Links
accord   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 7 uses
1  —4 uses as in:
according to, or in accord with
As soon as I heard of the shocking occurrence I perceived that my statement might be helpful and came forward accordingly.
accordingly = in keeping with (the perception)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of accord means:
in keeping with; or in agreement/harmony/unity with
This sense of accord is often seen in the form according to or accordingly where it can take on more specific meanings. For example:
  • "According to Kim, ..." — as stated by
  • "To each according to her ability." — based upon
  • "Points are scored according to how well they perform." — depending upon
  • "The dose is calculated according to body weight." — in proportion to
  • "We got a flat tire. Accordingly, I pulled to the side of the road." — because of what was just said; or as a result
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library53 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 7
Web Links
2  —3 uses as in:
done of her own accord
You, I understand, went to the police of your own accord?
own accord = own mind (voluntarily)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of accord means:
mind
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 7
Web Links
alacrity
1 use
Needless to say, I accepted with alacrity.
alacrity = quickness; and/or cheerful eagerness
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 32
Web Links
anonymous
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
an anonymous author
Did she ever get anonymous letters?
anonymous = written by an unknown person
DefinitionGenerally this sense of anonymous means:
an unknown person, or of an unknown person — such as an unknown author, or donation of an unknown person
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 5
Web Links
candid
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
your candid opinion
She did not attempt to gloss over facts, as so many might have been tempted to do, but went straight to the point with an admirable candour.
candour = honesty and directness

(editor's note:  This is a British spelling. Americans use candor.)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of candid means:
honest and direct
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 19
Web Links
coherent
2 uses
She sat twisting her hands together, almost weeping, appealing incoherently to Poirot.
incoherently = in an unclear manner (not understandable)

(Editor's note:  The prefix "in-" in incoherently means not and reverses the meaning of coherently. This is the same pattern you see in words like invisible, incomplete, and insecure.)
DefinitionGenerally coherent means:
sensible and clear; or describing parts as fitting together in a consistent or pleasing manner
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 23
Web Links
conjecture
3 uses
"That's all pure conjecture," I objected.
conjecture = opinion based on inconclusive evidence
DefinitionGenerally conjecture means:
a conclusion or opinion based on inconclusive evidence; or the act of forming of such a conclusion or opinion
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 6
Web Links
cunning
1 use
Stupid and cunning, ruthless and magnanimous-and that there must be some dominating factor that reconciles his two natures.
cunning = clever
DefinitionGenerally this sense of cunning means:
being good at achieving goals through cleverness — and typically through deception as well (tricking others)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 31
Web Links
disdain
2 uses
The inspector's tone was disdainful.
disdainful = lacking respect
DefinitionGenerally disdain means:
a lack of respect — often suggesting distaste and an undeserved sense of superiority

or:

to reject as not good enough
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 11
Web Links
dissent
1 use
There were no dissentient voices
dissentient = disagreeing
DefinitionGenerally dissent means:
to disagree; or disagreement or conflict — typically between people who cooperate, and often with official or majority beliefs
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 15
Web Links
elicit
4 uses
As far as I could judge, no new facts were elicited by his questions but he himself seemed quite satisfied.
elicited = brought out
DefinitionGenerally elicit means:
get or bring out in response — such as information or a feeling
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
gesticulate
1 use
He gesticulated as words failed him, then shook his head again.
gesticulated = made gestures (hand or body movements) while speaking or to express something
DefinitionGenerally gesticulate means:
to make gestures (hand or body movements) while speaking or to express something
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
Monsieur
9 uses
It is necessary to go into everything, Monsieur,
Monsieur = Mr. (in French)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of Monsieur means:
French equivalent to the English Mr.

or:

French equivalent to saying sir in English (a polite way to address a male)
Word Statistics
Book9 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 18
Web Links
narrative
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
Narrative of the Life of...
In this narrative of mine I have departed from my usual practice of reporting only those incidents and scenes at which I myself was present.
narrative = story
DefinitionGenerally this sense of narrative means:
a story
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useFrwd.
Web Links
obstinate
3 uses
And if you're an obstinate, positive man, like Mr. Strange, you'll never consider the possibility of having been mistaken.
obstinate = stubbornly unyielding to other's wishes
DefinitionGenerally obstinate means:
stubbornly not doing what others want
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 33
Web Links
plausible
3 uses
I thought it sounded very plausible.
plausible = reasonable, but unproven
DefinitionGenerally plausible means:
apparently reasonable, but unproven
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 6
Web Links
reproach
4 uses
I tore open the letter (Poirot for once did not reproach me for untidiness) and extracted the printed sheet.
reproach = criticize
DefinitionGenerally reproach means:
a criticism; or to express criticism — especially where a relationship makes the disapproval result in disappointment or shame
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 6
Web Links
reticent
1 use
It is invariably one of suspicion and the natural result is reticence.
reticence = reluctance to speak freely
DefinitionGenerally reticent means:
reluctant — especially to speak freely
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 6
Web Links
superintendent
12 uses
The Sussex Chief Constable looked at his superintendent.
superintendent = a person who directs and manages an organization
DefinitionGenerally superintendent means:
a person who directs and manages an organization — such as a school district

or:

a caretaker of a building — such as an apartment building
Word Statistics
Book12 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 8
Web Links
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