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The ABC Murders
Vocabulary

Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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audacious
1 use
audacious bit of work.
audacious = bold and daring
DefinitionGenerally audacious means:
bold and daring (inclined to take risks) — especially in violating social convention in a manner that could offend others
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 27
Web Links
bombastic
3 uses
-with two extremely bombastic Christian names: Alexander and Bonaparte.
bombastic = pompous or pretentious
DefinitionGenerally bombastic means:
pompous or pretentious talk or writing

(often using difficult words in an attempt to make something sound more important than it is or to make the speaker sound more intelligent)
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 31
Web Links
candid
1 use
She did not attempt to gloss over facts, as so many might have been tempted to do, but went straight to the point with an admirable candour.
candour = honesty and directness
DefinitionGenerally candid means:
honest and direct
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 19
Web Links
coherent
2 uses
She sat twisting her hands together, almost weeping, appealing incoherently to Poirot.
incoherently = in an unclear manner (not understandable)
DefinitionGenerally coherent means:
sensible and clear; or describing parts as fitting together in a consistent or pleasing manner
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 23
Web Links
conjecture
3 uses
"That's all pure conjecture," I objected.
conjecture = opinion based on inconclusive evidence
DefinitionGenerally conjecture means:
a conclusion or opinion based on inconclusive evidence; or the act of forming of such a conclusion or opinion
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 6
Web Links
discern
1 use
There was, discernible in the letter, a slight anti-foreign bias
discernible = possible to notice or understand
DefinitionGenerally discern means:
to notice or understand something — often something that is not obvious
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 34
Web Links
eccentric
1 use
For example, if a man insists on going out and squatting about in nothing but a loincloth his conduct seems eccentric in the extreme.
eccentric = unconventional or strange
DefinitionGenerally eccentric means:
unconventional or strange; or a person with such traits
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 34
Web Links
furtive
1 use
Three tall men with furtive expressions
furtive = suspicious
DefinitionGenerally furtive means:
taking pains to avoid being observed

or:

in a manner indicating nervousness (being cautious or appearing suspicious)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 7
Web Links
gesticulate
1 use
He gesticulated as words failed him, then shook his head again.
gesticulated = made gestures (hand or body movements) while speaking or to express something
DefinitionGenerally gesticulate means:
to make gestures (hand or body movements) while speaking or to express something
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
haughty
1 use
Just at first I fancied it was my Lily's voice-something like hers, it was-but haughtier if you know what I mean-sort of high up in the air.
haughtier = arrogant or condescending (acting superior or self-important)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 28
Web Links
incessant
1 use
Reporters incessantly badgered him for interviews.
incessantly = continuously
DefinitionGenerally incessant means:
continuous — often in an annoying way
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 17
Web Links
irony
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
verbal irony
Nobody in the world could put a gentle nuance of irony into a couple of words better than Poirot.
irony = saying one thing while meaning the opposite
DefinitionGenerally this sense of irony means:
saying one thing, while meaning the opposite or something else — usually as humor or sarcasm
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 18
Web Links
malevolent
1 use
...the unpleasant shaking old man with the malevolent, mouthing jaw was removed.
malevolent = exerting an evil or harmful influence
DefinitionGenerally malevolent means:
evil:
  • of a person:  wishing or appearing to wish evil to others
  • of a thing:  exerting an evil or harmful influence
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
notorious
1 use
That's what he wants-publicity-notoriety.
notoriety = fame for something bad
DefinitionGenerally notorious means:
well known for something bad
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 13
Web Links
obstinate
3 uses
And if you're an obstinate, positive man, like Mr. Strange, you'll never consider the possibility of having been mistaken.
obstinate = stubbornly unyielding to other's wishes
DefinitionGenerally obstinate means:
stubbornly not doing what others want
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 33
Web Links
prosaic
1 use
He never left the cinema very quickly. It always took him a moment or two to return to the prosaic reality of everyday life.
prosaic = lacking anything unusual, interesting, or challenging
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 24
Web Links
reprove
1 use
Poirot threw me a glance of reproof.
reproof = criticism
DefinitionGenerally reprove means:
to express disapproval of one's actions to them
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3
Web Links
reticent
1 use
It is invariably one of suspicion and the natural result is reticence.
reticence = reluctance to speak freely
DefinitionGenerally reticent means:
reluctant — especially to speak freely
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 6
Web Links
supercilious
1 use
He said it as naturally as Inspector Crome might have said it-but without the superciliousness.
superciliousness = arrogant (acting as if better, more important, and superior in ideas than others)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 33
Web Links
vacillate
1 use
Two people were involved-the real murderer, cunning, resourceful and calculating-and the pseudo murderer, stupid, vacillating and suggestible.
vacillating = changing one's mind back and forth between conflicting ideas
DefinitionGenerally vacillate means:
to change one's mind back and forth between conflicting ideas

or:

to sway back and forth
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 34
Web Links
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