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Early Cases Of Hercule Poirot
Vocabulary

Top-Ranked Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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amiable
7 uses
"Thank you for your amiability, Doctor," said Poirot.
amiability = friendliness and kindness
DefinitionGenerally amiable means:
friendly and kindly
Word Statistics
Book7 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 5
Web Links
augment
1 use
augmenting the dose
augmenting = increasing
DefinitionGenerally augment means:
enlarge or increase
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
candid
2 uses
Now, M. Poirot, I'm going to be candid with you.
candid = honest and direct
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 12
Web Links
complacent
1 use
"Four hundred and forty-four pounds, four and fourpence," said Poirot with some complacency.
complacency = contentedness (satisfaction without worry)
DefinitionGenerally complacent means:
contented (unworried and satisfied) — often to a fault
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 6
Web Links
contempt
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
feels contempt towards her
Her contempt rang out.
contempt = disrespect
DefinitionGenerally this sense of contempt means:
lack of respect — often accompanied by a feeling of intense dislike or disgust
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library11 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 13
Web Links
credulous
1 use
"Credulous," he murmured, as our visitor departed, "but perhaps not more than most of her class."
credulous = gullible (being too willing to believe)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
deprecate
2 uses
Poirot shook his head, as though deprecating the other's jesting tone
deprecating = belittling or disapproving
DefinitionGenerally deprecate means:
to belittle (diminish the value of) or express disapproval of something
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 6
Web Links
dubious
2 uses
And yet, from time to time, Poirot continued to sniff it dubiously, as though his keener nose detected something I had missed.
dubiously = suspiciously
DefinitionGenerally dubious means:
doubtful — such as:
  • uncertain that something can be relied upon
  • uncertain about the quality or wisdom of something
  • a relatively gentle way of saying that the quality of something described as good is in such doubt that it is considered bad
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 10
Web Links
eccentric
4 uses
It may occur to you that I am eccentric, perhaps mad.
eccentric = unconventional or strange
DefinitionGenerally eccentric means:
unconventional or strange; or a person with such traits
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 6
Web Links
fastidious
1 use
The room was still untouched, and Poirot idly gathered up the cards, shuffling them with his tiny, fastidiously groomed hands.
fastidiously = with excessive concern for cleanliness or matters of taste
DefinitionGenerally fastidious means:
giving careful attention to detail

or:

excessively concerned with cleanliness or matters of taste
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 5
Web Links
irony   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 2 uses
1  —1 use as in:
situational irony
-a strange irony, by the way, that led the unfortunate woman to come to this building where her rival lived-
irony = an interesting coincidence
DefinitionGenerally this sense of irony means:
when what happens is very different than what might be expected; or when things are together that seem like they don't belong together — especially when amusing or an entertaining coincidence
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library13 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 9
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
verbal irony
  "Fact!" said General Forbes. "Heard it from old Bassington-ffrench. And he heard it from old Badger Cotterill who'd got it from Snooks Parker.'"
  Miss Henderson nodded brightly. "That does seem to settle it!' she said."
  A fleeting smile showed for a minute on the face of a small man sitting near them. Miss Henderson noticed the smile. She was observant. It had shown appreciation of the irony underlying her last remark...
irony = saying something that could be taken to mean the opposite of what was intended
DefinitionGenerally this sense of irony means:
saying one thing, while meaning the opposite or something else — usually as humor or sarcasm
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 12
Web Links
minuteness
6 uses
1  —6 uses as in:
minute size; or minute description
Seizing my opportunity, I too knelt down, and taking the handkerchief from the sleeve, scrutinized it minutely.†
minutely = with careful attention to detail
DefinitionGenerally this sense of minuteness means:
very small

or:

detailed (including even small considerations); or careful (done with care)
Word Statistics
Book6 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3
Web Links
Monsieur
128 uses
The great Monsieur Poirot.
Monsieur = Mr. (in French)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of Monsieur means:
French equivalent to:  "Mr." in English

or:

French equivalent to: "sir" in English (a polite way to address a male)
Word Statistics
Book128 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
obscure   (3 meanings)
3 meanings, 5 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
the view or directions are obscure
"A pleasing little problem, obscure and charming," murmured Poirot. "I will investigate it for you with pleasure."
obscure = mysterious (difficult to understand/solve)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of obscure means:
not clearly seen, understood, or expressed
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 3
Web Links
2  —2 uses as in:
knows the famous and the obscure
Although perhaps it is not so fully demonstrative of Poirot's peculiar methods as some of the more obscure cases, its sensational features, the well-known people involved, and the tremendous publicity given it by the Press, make it stand out...
obscure = inconspicuously (in a manner where they are not noticed)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of obscure means:
not known to many people; or unimportant or undistinguished
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
3  —1 use as in:
was obscure, but now bright
The Daily Blare was a paper that made the most of any opportunity for sensationalism. Robberies and murders did not lurk obscurely in its back pages. Instead they hit you in the eye in large type on the front page.
obscurely = not known to many people
DefinitionGenerally this sense of obscure means:
dark or dingy; or inconspicuous (not very noticeable)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
poignant
2 uses
we have here a very poignant human drama.
poignant = profoundly touching the emotions —  especially sadness or pity
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3
Web Links
prosaic
2 uses
"Well, they will do it," said Japp prosaically.
prosaically = in a matter-of-fact manner (lacking anything unusual, interesting, or challenging)
DefinitionGenerally prosaic means:
lacking anything unusual, interesting, or challenging
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 10
Web Links
relevant
1 use
Nothing that's strictly relevant.
relevant = relating in a meaningful way to the issue in question
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 10
1st useChapter 13
Web Links
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