toggle menu
menu
vocabulary
1000+ books
Book Menu

Early Cases Of Hercule Poirot

Top-Ranked Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

instructions
amiable
7 uses
"Thank you for your amiability, Doctor," said Poirot.
amiability = the quality of being friendly and agreeable
DefinitionGenerally amiable means:
friendly, agreeable, and likable
Word Statistics
Book7 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 5
Web Links
candid
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
your candid opinion
Now, M. Poirot, I'm going to be candid with you.
candid = honest and direct
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 12
Web Links
complacent
1 use
"Four hundred and forty-four pounds, four and fourpence," said Poirot with some complacency.
complacency = contentedness (satisfaction without worry)
DefinitionGenerally complacent means:
contented (unworried and satisfied) — often to a fault
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 6
Web Links
contempt
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
feels contempt towards her
Her contempt rang out.
contempt = disrespect
DefinitionGenerally this sense of contempt means:
lack of respect for someone or something thought inferior — often accompanied by a feeling of dislike or disgust
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 13
Web Links
credulous
2 uses
"Credulous," he murmured, as our visitor departed, "but perhaps not more than most of her class."
credulous = gullible (being too willing to believe)
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
deprecate
2 uses
Poirot shook his head, as though deprecating the other's jesting tone
deprecating = disapproving of
DefinitionGenerally deprecate means:
to diminish or treat something as unimportant or of low quality; or to express disapproval
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 6
Web Links
dispose
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
disposed the troops along...
He met us with the utmost frankness, was desolated to hear of the Chinaman's untimely death, and put himself at our disposal in every way.†
disposal = command

(editor's note:  When something is "at someone's disposal" it is "at their command," or "available for their use." They can use it as they please.)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of dispose means:
the arrangement, positioning, or use of things
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
dubious
2 uses
And yet, from time to time, Poirot continued to sniff it dubiously, as though his keener nose detected something I had missed.
dubiously = suspiciously
DefinitionGenerally dubious means:
doubtful
in various senses, including:
  • doubtful that something should be relied upon — as in "The argument relies on a dubious assumption."
  • doubtful that something is morally proper — as in "The company is accused of using dubious sales practices to influence minors."
  • bad or of questionable value — as in "The state has the dubious distinction of the highest taxes."
  • doubtful or uncertain — as in "She is dubious about making the change."
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 10
Web Links
eccentric
4 uses
It may occur to you that I am eccentric, perhaps mad.
eccentric = unconventional or strange
DefinitionGenerally eccentric means:
unconventional or strange; or a person with such traits
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 6
Web Links
fastidious
1 use
The room was still untouched, and Poirot idly gathered up the cards, shuffling them with his tiny, fastidiously groomed hands.
fastidiously = with excessive concern for cleanliness or matters of taste
DefinitionGenerally fastidious means:
giving careful attention to detail

or:

excessively concerned with cleanliness or matters of taste
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 5
Web Links
irony   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 2 uses
1  —1 use as in:
situational irony
-a strange irony, by the way, that led the unfortunate woman to come to this building where her rival lived-
irony = an interesting coincidence
DefinitionGenerally this sense of irony means:
when what happens is very different than what might be expected; or when things are together that seem like they don't belong together — especially when amusing or an entertaining coincidence
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library16 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 9
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
verbal irony
  "Fact!" said General Forbes. "Heard it from old Bassington-ffrench. And he heard it from old Badger Cotterill who'd got it from Snooks Parker.'"
  Miss Henderson nodded brightly. "That does seem to settle it!' she said."
  A fleeting smile showed for a minute on the face of a small man sitting near them. Miss Henderson noticed the smile. She was observant. It had shown appreciation of the irony underlying her last remark...
irony = saying something that could be taken to mean the opposite of what was intended
DefinitionGenerally this sense of irony means:
saying one thing, while meaning the opposite or something else — usually as humor or sarcasm
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 12
Web Links
Monsieur
128 uses
The great Monsieur Poirot.
Monsieur = Mr. (in French)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of Monsieur means:
French equivalent to the English Mr.

or:

French equivalent to saying sir in English (a polite way to address a male)
Word Statistics
Book128 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
obstinate
3 uses
But there he ran up against the obstinacy of the Admiral.
obstinacy = trait of being stubborn and unyielding to other's wishes
DefinitionGenerally obstinate means:
stubbornly not doing what others want
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 8
Web Links
pious
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
a good, pious woman
She, poor child, beautiful, naturally pious, was fascinated by him.
pious = highly moral
DefinitionGenerally this sense of pious means:
religious or highly moral
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 7
Web Links
poignant
2 uses
we have here a very poignant human drama.
poignant = deeply touching the emotions
DefinitionGenerally poignant means:
sharp or intense — typically arousing deep emotion such as sadness, but possibly having or creating a sharp smell, taste, or insight
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 3
Web Links
relevant
1 use
Nothing that's strictly relevant.
relevant = relating in a meaningful way to the issue in question
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 10
1st useChapter 13
Web Links
reticent
2 uses
There was no reticence about Mr Johnston's past.
reticence = reluctance to speak freely
DefinitionGenerally reticent means:
reluctant — especially to speak freely
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3
Web Links
scrupulous
3 uses
Though he neither drank nor smoked, he was nevertheless not so scrupulous in other ways.
scrupulous = careful to behave well
DefinitionGenerally scrupulous means:
careful to behave ethically and/or diligently (with great care and attention to detail)
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 7
Web Links
scrutiny
3 uses
Seizing my opportunity, I too knelt down, and taking the handkerchief from the sleeve, scrutinized it minutely.
scrutinized = looked at very carefully

(editor's note:  The suffix "-ive" converts a word to a verb. This is the same pattern you see in words like apologize, theorize, and dramatize.)
DefinitionGenerally scrutiny means:
careful examination of something
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library10 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 7
Web Links
Go to Book Menu
Take Pre-Reading Quiz
† 
Sample usage followed by this mark was not checked by an editor. Please let us know if you spot a problem.
SAT® is a registered trademark of the College Board, which is not affiliated with verbalworkout.com™, and does not endorse this site.