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The Stranger
Vocabulary

Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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cantankerous
1 use
"He was a cantankerous brute," Salamano said.
cantankerous = having a difficult and contrary disposition
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.5
Web Links
cogent
2 uses
Or does my friend think that by aspersing a witness for the prosecution he will shake the evidence, the abundant and cogent evidence, against his client?
cogent = powerfully persuasive

(editor's note:  Aspersing is a form of asperse which is most commonly seen in the form aspersion as in: "I resent the aspersion cast on my integrity." Aspersing means "attacking someone's reputation".)
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.3
Web Links
compunction
1 use
This man has, I repeat, no place in a community whose basic principles he flouts without compunction.
compunction = regret or guilt
DefinitionGenerally compunction means:
guilt for a misdeed; or a feeling that it would be wrong to do something
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.4
Web Links
cordial
3 uses
The Judge questioned me quite calmly and even, I thought, with a hint of cordiality.
cordiality = friendliness
DefinitionGenerally this sense of cordial means:
showing warm and heartfelt friendliness
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.3
Web Links
correspond
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
foreign correspondent of the paper
That fellow's the special correspondent of one of the Paris dailies.†
correspondent = reporter
DefinitionGenerally this sense of correspondent means:
a reporter — typically from a foreign country or with a particular expertise
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.3
Web Links
dubious
1 use
a man "of more than dubious reputation."
dubious = doubtful or suspicious
DefinitionGenerally dubious means:
doubtful — such as:
  • uncertain that something can be relied upon
  • uncertain about the quality or wisdom of something
  • a relatively gentle way of saying that the quality of something described as good is in such doubt that it is considered bad
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 2.4
Web Links
elaborate
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
an elaborate wink
The only things that really caught my attention were occasional phrases, his gestures, and some elaborate tirades.
elaborate = exaggerated (possibly with much detail and complexity)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of elaborate means:
to exaggerate an action
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 2.4
Web Links
futile
2 uses
But, when I had to drop my studies, I very soon realized all that was pretty futile.
futile = pointless (because it is unproductive)
DefinitionGenerally futile means:
effort that is pointless because it is unproductive or unsuccessful
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.4
Web Links
gesticulate
1 use
She was wedged between a small old woman with tight-set lips and a fat matron, without a hat, who was talking shrilly and gesticulated all the time.
gesticulated = made gestures (hand or body movements) while speaking
DefinitionGenerally gesticulate means:
to make gestures (hand or body movements) while speaking or to express something
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.2
Web Links
ingenuous
1 use
But then the Prosecutor sprang to his feet and, draping his gown round him, said he was amazed at his friend's ingenuousness in failing to see that between these two elements of the case there was a vital link.
ingenuousness = lack of sophistication
DefinitionGenerally ingenuous means:
innocent as in lacking in sophistication or worldliness — especially in being direct and not masking feelings
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.3
Web Links
irony
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
verbal irony
he remarked in a slightly ironic tone that obviously this was a "delicate topic" and he could enter into the young lady's feelings, but—and here his voice grew sterner—his duty obliged him to waive considerations of delicacy.
ironic = saying one thing while meaning the opposite
DefinitionGenerally this sense of irony means:
saying one thing, while meaning the opposite or something else — usually as humor or sarcasm
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.3
Web Links
languid
3 uses
On the whole, however, they seemed languid and exhausted.
languid = to lack energy
DefinitionGenerally languid means:
lacking energy or relaxed or moving slowly
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.2
Web Links
malicious
2 uses
They looked harmless enough, as if they didn't bear any malice,
malice = desire to see others suffer
DefinitionGenerally malicious means:
wanting to see others suffer; or threatening evil
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library9 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 1.6
Web Links
palaver
1 use
Anyhow, after some palavering among the bench, the Prosecutor, and my counsel, the presiding judge announced that the court would now rise; there was an adjournment till the afternoon, when evidence would be taken.
palavering = talking
DefinitionGenerally palaver means:
talk — typically empty talk or flattery
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.3
Web Links
perturb
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
she was perturbed
Here the lawyer interrupted me, looking greatly perturbed.
perturbed = disturbed
DefinitionGenerally this sense of perturb means:
to disturb in mind or make uneasy
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.1
Web Links
plausible
3 uses
In one way it sounded most unlikely; in another, it was plausible enough.
plausible = reasonable
DefinitionGenerally plausible means:
apparently reasonable, but unproven
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 2.2
Web Links
reproach
3 uses
But he didn't sound reproachful; he simply wanted to know.
reproachful = full of criticism
DefinitionGenerally reproach means:
a criticism; or to express criticism
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.1
Web Links
superficial
1 use
He now proposed ... certain matters which, on a superficial view, might seem foreign to the case, but actually were highly relevant.
superficial = relating to a surface rather than to anything deep or penetrating
DefinitionGenerally superficial means:
relating to a surface rather than to anything deep or penetrating (often of injuries or thinking)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 2.3
Web Links
taciturn
1 use
He led off by remarking that I had the reputation of being a taciturn, rather self-centered person,
taciturn = tending not to speak much
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.1
Web Links
tirade
1 use
The only things that really caught my attention were occasional phrases, his gestures, and some elaborate tirades—but these were isolated patches.
tirades = speeches of angry criticism
DefinitionGenerally tirade means:
a speech of angry criticism
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.4
Web Links
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