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The Outsiders

Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

instructions
abide
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
abide by her decision
And Johnny, who was the most law-abiding of us, now carried in his back pocket a six-inch switchblade.
law-abiding = obeying (in this case, following the law)
From page 34.3  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of abide means:
to tolerate or put up with something
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2, p.34.3
Web Links
acquire
1 use
He was famous for shoplifting and his black-handled switchblade (which he couldn't have acquired without his first talent),
acquired = obtained (come into possession of)
From page 10.2  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally acquire means:
obtain (come into the possession of something)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library17 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 1, p.10.2
Web Links
aghast
1 use
  "Ever consider working for a living?"
  "Work?" Two-Bit was aghast.
aghast = shocked or surprised
From page 112.5  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally aghast means:
shocked with feelings of surprise and dismay (sadness, disappointment, or worry)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 7, p.112.5
Web Links
agony
2 uses
He was very still, and for a moment I thought in agony: He's dead already.
agony = intense suffering
From page 148.3  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally agony means:
intense feelings of suffering — can be from mental or physical pain
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library15 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 9, p.148.3
Web Links
aloof
1 use
Socs were always behind a wall of aloofness, careful not to let their real selves show through.
aloofness = social distance (acting superior)

(Editor's note:  The suffix "-ness" converts an adjective to a noun that means the quality of. This is the same pattern you see in words like darkness, kindness, and coolness.)
From page 38.7  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally aloof means:
socially distant or uninterested in something that interests others — often thinking oneself superior to others
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3, p.38.7
Web Links
apparent
2 uses
I had thought about turning ourselves in lots of times, but apparently the whole idea was a jolt to Dallas.
apparently = obviously or clearly
From page 87.3  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally apparent means:
clear or obvious; or appearing as such but not necessarily so
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library66 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 6, p.87.3
Web Links
appreciate
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
I appreciate the complexities
I was too worried and scared to appreciate the fact that he was trying to be funny.
appreciate = understand
From page 95.7  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of appreciate means:
to understand a situation-often one with important complications
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library16 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 6, p.95.7
Web Links
assets
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
it's one of her best assets
...and get editorials in the paper for being a public disgrace one day and an asset to society the next.
asset = something of value
From page 3.1  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of assets means:
a positive trait or thing of value
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1, p.3.1
Web Links
content
2 uses
I wish they were more gray, because I hate most guys that have green eyes, but I have to be content with what I have.
content = satisfied
From page 1.5  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library54 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1, p.1.5
Web Links
detach
2 uses
Numerous bruises along my back and on my face were throbbing, but I felt detached from the pain, as if it wasn't really me feeling it.
detached = separated
From page 145.2  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally detach means:
to separate something from something else (physically or emotionally)
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library10 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 6, p.92.4
Web Links
determine
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
is determined to succeed
Living the way we do would only make him more determined to get somewhere.
determined = firm in purpose
From page 138.5  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library15 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1, p.6.9
dumfounded
2 uses
  "Hate to tell you this, kiddo," the guy said dryly, "but you're bleedin' all over my car seats."
  I blinked. "I am?"
  "Your head."
  I reached up to scratch the side of my head where it'd been itching for a while, and when I looked at my hand it was smeared with blood. "Gosh, mister, I'm sorry," I said, dumfounded.
dumfounded = very surprised
From page 151.5  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally dumfounded means:
very surprised - often too surprised to know what to say or do
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3, p.42.5
Web Links
manslaughter
1 use
But they were charging Johnny with manslaughter.
manslaughter = the crime of unintentionally killing someone
From page 108  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally manslaughter means:
unintentional killing of a person
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 7, p.108
Web Links
mock
1 use
Sodapop looked down at me with mock superiority, but Darry went on:
mock = fake (not really felt)
From page 135.5  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally mock means:
making fun of

or:

not real
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library31 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 9, p.135.5
Web Links
nonchalant
1 use
"Okay," I said nonchalantly, "might as well."
nonchalantly = appearing calm and unconcerned
From page 25.8  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally nonchalant means:
calm in manner — appearing unconcerned
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2, p.25.8
Web Links
principle
1 use
Cherry had said she wouldn't drink Dally's Coke if she was starving, and she meant it. It was the principle of the thing. But Marcia saw no reason to throw away a perfectly good, free Coke.
principle = basic rule or belief
From page 30.7  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally principle means:
a basic rule or belief
The exact meaning of principle can depend upon its context. For example:
  • "our guiding principles" — basic moral beliefs that guide decisions and behavior
  • "electromagnetic principles" — rules describing how the world works
  • "She lacks principles." — lacks moral guidelines
  • "We agree in principle." — about important basic beliefs
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library23 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 2, p.30.7
Web Links
recur
1 use
I would dream this dream and wake up in a cold sweat or screaming. ... Soda began sleeping with me, and it stopped recurring so often, but it happened often enough for Darry to take me to a doctor.
recurring = happening repeatedly
From page 110.6  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally recur means:
to happen repeatedly or a second time
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 7, p.110.6
Web Links
resignation
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
accepted it with resignation
"Well," Cherry said resignedly, "they've spotted us."
resignedly = as though having accepted something undesirable as unavoidable
From page 44.1  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of resignation means:
acceptance of something undesired as unavoidable or the lesser of evils
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 3, p.44.1
Web Links
sage
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
sage advice
  "Nice-lookin' bruise you got there, kid."
  I touched my cheek gingerly. "Really?"
  Two-Bit nodded sagely. "Nice cut, too."
sagely = like a wise person with experience
From page 12.8  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of sage means:
profound wisdom; or one known for being wise
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1, p.12.8
Web Links
wistful
1 use
"Gee," Johnny said wistfully, "it sure will be good to get into a car again."
wistfully = in the manner of someone who misses having something they used to have
From page 82.9  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally wistful means:
showing longing or unfulfilled desire
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 5, p.82.9
Web Links
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