toggle menu
menu
vocabulary
1000+ books
Book Menu

Tender is the Night

Top-Ranked Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

instructions
accompany
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
accompany on the journey
Dick accompanied her to the door of the elevator.
accompanied = went with
DefinitionGenerally this sense of accompany means:
to travel along with
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library9 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 10
1st useChapter 2.13
Web Links
apathy
4 uses
Meals with the patients were a chore he approached with apathy.
apathy = lack of interest and enthusiasm
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.18
Web Links
ascetic
4 uses
Living rather ascetically, travelling third-class ... and penalizing himself for any extravagances, he maintained a qualified financial independence.
ascetically = in the manner of someone who practices self-denial
DefinitionGenerally ascetic means:
someone who practices self-denial (often to encourage spiritual growth); or relating to such self-denial

or:

severely plain (without decoration)
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.12
Web Links
conciliatory
4 uses
And then, in a more conciliatory tone, "This has gone far enough, Tommy."
conciliatory = intended to end bad feelings or build trust
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.11
Web Links
consulate
11 uses
you can get aid and advice from the Consulate, which protects the rights of American citizens.
consulate = a representative of a government who lives in a foreign city
DefinitionGenerally consulate means:
the offices where a consul works; or a consul (a diplomat appointed by a government to live in a foreign country, help its citizens visiting that country, and protect its commercial interests there)
Word Statistics
Book11 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.23
Web Links
deference
5 uses
He greeted his new guests with a proud bearing and an obvious deference to their infinite and unknown possibilities.
deference = polite respect
DefinitionGenerally deference means:
polite respect — often when submitting to another's wishes
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 1.1
Web Links
deliberate   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 5 uses
1  —1 use as in:
deliberate insult
He could not decide whether she was deliberately building a barrier between them or whether this was intended to make an eventual surrender more significant.
deliberately = intentionally
DefinitionGenerally this sense of deliberate means:
to do something intentionally (do it on purpose)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.20
Web Links
2  —4 uses as in:
need to deliberate
"This is not as it should be," Dick deliberated.
deliberated = thought about or discussed
DefinitionGenerally this sense of deliberate means:
to think about or discuss — especially with great care
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library13 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.24
Web Links
deride
7 uses
"Of all the narrow-minded excuses," McKisco looked around to establish a derisive liaison with some one else, but without success.
derisive = contemptuous (treating as inferior and unworthy of respect)

(editor's note:  By derisive liaison, Fitzgerald is saying that McKisco is looking for someone who will join him in feeling superior.)
DefinitionGenerally deride means:
to criticize with strong disrespect — often
with humor
Word Statistics
Book7 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.4
Web Links
descend
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
descend the mountain
Collis took his arm and they descended the steps.
descended = moved downward on
DefinitionGenerally this sense of descend means:
move or slope downward
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.23
Web Links
disdain
2 uses
"I shall not," said Lady Caroline disdainfully.
disdainfully = with a lack of respect
DefinitionGenerally disdain means:
a lack of respect — often suggesting distaste and an undeserved sense of superiority

or:

to reject as not good enough
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 3.10
Web Links
disparage
3 uses
a feat not to be disparaged
disparaged = criticized or made seem unimportant
DefinitionGenerally disparage means:
to criticize or make seem less important — especially in a disrespectful or contemptuous manner
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 3.5
Web Links
indulgent
9 uses
Dick laughed indulgently at Abe, whom he loved, and in whom he had long lost hope:
indulgently = with extra kindness or tolerance
DefinitionGenerally indulgent means:
to treat with extra kindness or tolerance
Word Statistics
Book9 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.19
Web Links
irony
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
verbal irony
He spoke with incisive irony. "Tell a secret over the radio, publish it in a tabloid, but never tell it to a man who drinks more than three or four a day."
irony = saying one thing while meaning something else
DefinitionGenerally this sense of irony means:
saying one thing, while meaning the opposite or something else — usually as humor or sarcasm
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.17
Web Links
mollify
1 use
Then, as if the sound recalled the past, the old friendship, Mary guessed how far away from them she had gone and said in a mollifying tone: "It's always like that with children."
mollifying = calming
DefinitionGenerally mollify means:
calm someone who is or may become angry or upset
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3.4
Web Links
profound
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
profound sadness
Now a strong current of emotion flowed through her, profound and unidentified.
profound = of greatest intensity or emotional depth
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.12
Web Links
resignation   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 4 uses
1  —1 use as in:
submitted her resignation
first year at West Point—that year during which no cadet can resign and from which none ever recovers
resign = quit (a position or job)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of resignation means:
to quit — especially a job or position; or a document expressing such an act
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library12 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 1.12
Web Links
2  —3 uses as in:
accepted it with resignation
he has been in a very religious and resigned mood from the beginning of his illness.
resigned = with acceptance of something undesired as unavoidable
DefinitionGenerally this sense of resignation means:
acceptance of something undesired as unavoidable or the lesser of evils
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 1.24
Web Links
strata
1 use
But he had read about Chicago in those days, about the great feudal families of Armour, Palmer, Field, Crane, Warren, Swift, and McCormick and many others, and since that time not a few patients had come to him from that stratum of Chicago and New York.
stratum = social class

(editor's note:  Strata, the plural form of this word is used much more commonly than the singular form. Many Latin words that end in "um" are made plural by changing the "um" to "a"—such as stratum to strata, bacterium to bacteria, and millennium to millennia. In modern writing, changing the "um" to "ums" is also accepted for many Latin words ending in um, but not for any of those listed above.)
DefinitionGenerally strata means:
layers

or:

levels, classes, or groups into which people or other things are divided
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.3
Web Links
tranquil
7 uses
I am here on this tranquil beach with my husband and two children.
tranquil = calm and undisturbed
Word Statistics
Book7 uses
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.1
Web Links
Go to Book Menu
Take Pre-Reading Quiz
SAT® is a registered trademark of the College Board, which is not affiliated with verbalworkout.com™, and does not endorse this site.