toggle menu
menu
vocabulary
1000+ books
Book Menu

Sophie's World

Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

instructions
ambivalent
1 use
Niels Bohr, who, like our own Norwegian poet Vinje, was known for his ambivalence, once said: There are two kinds of truths.
ambivalence = uncertainty, or mixed feelings
DefinitionGenerally ambivalent means:
having mixed feelings about something — such as when part of you wants to do something and part of you does not
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 26
Web Links
apathy
1 use
I will not allow you, of all people, to join the ranks of the apathetic...
apathetic = people having a lack of interest and enthusiasm
DefinitionGenerally apathy means:
lack of interest and enthusiasm
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
candid
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
your candid opinion
To be perfectly candid, yes. He should be ashamed of himself!
candid = honest and straightforward
DefinitionGenerally this sense of candid means:
honest and direct
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 22
Web Links
conjugate
1 use
I do not intend to give you any homework—no difficult math questions, or anything like that, and conjugating English verbs is outside my sphere of interest.
conjugating = grammatically changing verb forms to match context
DefinitionGenerally this sense of conjugate means:
grammatical changes of verb forms to agree with other words in a sentence for tense, number, person, and other things

English tense example:
    She writes.
    She is writing.
    She will write tomorrow.
    She has written in the past.
  
English number example:
      Jane is...
      Jane and Susan are...
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
defer
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
deferred the decision
Sophi felt she was only deferring the problem.
deferring = postponing
DefinitionGenerally this sense of defer means:
delay or postpone (hold off until a later time)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
depravity
1 use
Luther had proclaimed that mankind was totally depraved after the Fall from Grace.
depraved = immoral or evil
DefinitionGenerally depravity means:
complete immorality or evilness
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 16
Web Links
deter
2 uses
Twice the dog turned around and growled, but Sophie was not to be deterred.
deterred = stopped (prevented from continuing)
DefinitionGenerally deter means:
try to prevent; or prevent
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 9
Web Links
diligent
1 use
This state of affairs rewarded people's diligence, imagination, and ingenuity.
diligence = hard work and care in tasks
DefinitionGenerally this sense of diligent means:
hard work and care in tasks — often continuing when others might quit because of difficulties
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 16
Web Links
dogmatic
1 use
If I did not keep this possibility open I would be dogmatic, and not a true philosopher.
dogmatic = prone to stating opinions as absolute truth
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 31
Web Links
effrontery
1 use
Can't you see how he has the effrontery to compare his own shabby surveillance of us with God's providence?
effrontery = impolite boldness
DefinitionGenerally effrontery means:
rude and disrespectful behavior — often made by someone who does not realize they are being rude — as when someone is presumptuous or impolitely bold
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 17
Web Links
gesticulate
1 use
They were all talking away, gesticulating vehemently, but it didn't look as though they were talking about anything that mattered.
gesticulating = making gestures (hand or body movements) while speaking or to express something
DefinitionGenerally gesticulate means:
to make gestures (hand or body movements) while speaking or to express something
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 31
Web Links
heresy
4 uses
They tried to disinherit him on the grounds of his heresy.
heresy = opinions or actions most people consider immoral
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 16
Web Links
hygiene
1 use
If we pay absolutely no attention to what is called hereditary hygiene, we could find ourselves facing a degeneration of the human race.
hygiene = practices promoting the prevention of illness and maintenance of health
DefinitionGenerally hygiene means:
practices promoting the prevention of illness and maintenance of health — such as cleanliness or promoting sanitary conditions
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 29
Web Links
laconic
1 use
The comic effect in these silent movies was often Chaplin's laconic acceptance of all the absurd things that happen to him.
laconic = using few words
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 31
Web Links
latent
5 uses
They have, though; the words and the ideas have lain 'latent' in their consciousness, but now, when all caution and all censorship have let go, they are surfacing.
latent = potentially existing but not presently evident or active
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 30
Web Links
minute
4 uses
1  —4 uses as in:
minute size
He pondered constantly on yell's theory of the minute changes that could have great effect over a long period of time.†
minute = small
DefinitionGenerally this sense of minute means:
small, exceptionally small, or insignificant
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
orthodox
3 uses
The teachings of Jesus therefore represented a liberation from the orthodoxy of Judaism.
orthodoxy = a commonly accepted belief or practice
DefinitionGenerally orthodox means:
normal (describing thinking or behavior as commonly or traditionally accepted)
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 19
Web Links
pious
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
a good, pious woman
[Immanuel Kant] His family was deeply pious, and his own religious conviction formed a significant background to his philosophy.
pious = religious
DefinitionGenerally this sense of pious means:
religious or highly moral
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 16
Web Links
refute
1 use
Now that I have told you such a lot about Plato, you must start by hearing how Aristotle refuted Plato's theory of ideas.
refuted = argued it was false
DefinitionGenerally refute means:
to disprove or argue against
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 11
Web Links
scrupulous
1 use
Sometimes it looks as if people act quite unscrupulously, but I believe they also have a kind of conscience somewhere, deep down.
unscrupulously = unethically

(editor's note:  The prefix "un-" in unscrupulously means not and reverses the meaning of scrupulously. This is the same pattern you see in words like unhappy, unknown, and unlucky.)
DefinitionGenerally scrupulous means:
careful to behave ethically and/or diligently (with great care and attention to detail)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 12
Web Links
Go to Book Menu
Take Pre-Reading Quiz
† 
Sample usage followed by this mark was not checked by an editor. Please let us know if you spot a problem.
SAT® is a registered trademark of the College Board, which is not affiliated with verbalworkout.com™, and does not endorse this site.