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The Red Badge of Courage

Top-Ranked Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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clamor
10 uses
In his great anxiety his heart was continually clamoring at what he considered the intolerable slowness of the generals.
clamoring = demanding loudly and persistently
DefinitionGenerally clamor means:
loud noise and/or persistent demands — especially from human voice
Word Statistics
Book10 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
compel
13 uses
he had been compelled to leave a little protection of stones and dirt to which he had devoted much care and skill.
compelled = forced — perhaps by an inner desire
DefinitionGenerally compel means:
to force someone to do something

or more rarely:

to convince someone to do something
Word Statistics
Book13 uses
Library9 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
conciliatory
2 uses
"Why, no," he hastened to say in a conciliating voice "I don't think I fought the whole battle yesterday."
conciliating = attempting to end bad feelings or build trust
DefinitionGenerally conciliatory means:
intended to end bad feelings or build trust
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 16
Web Links
contempt
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
feels contempt towards her
Thinking of the slain, he achieved a great contempt for some of them, as if they were guilty for thus becoming lifeless.
contempt = disrespect
DefinitionGenerally this sense of contempt means:
lack of respect for someone or something thought inferior — often accompanied by a feeling of dislike or disgust
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 11
Web Links
deride
7 uses
It would now be he who could laugh and shoot the shafts of derision.
derision = treatment as inferior and unworthy of respect

(editor's note:  The suffix "-sion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in admission from admit, discussion from discuss, and invasion from invade.)
DefinitionGenerally deride means:
to criticize with strong disrespect — often
with humor
Word Statistics
Book7 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 7
Web Links
disdain
3 uses
He veiled a glance of disdain at his fellows
disdain = lack of respect
DefinitionGenerally disdain means:
a lack of respect — often suggesting distaste and an undeserved sense of superiority

or:

to reject as not good enough
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
indifferent
5 uses
And this inward confidence evidently enabled him to be indifferent to little words of other men aimed at him.
indifferent = unconcerned (without interest)
DefinitionGenerally indifferent means:
without interest
in various senses, including:
  • unconcerned — as in "She is indifferent to what is served to eat."
  • unsympathetic — as in "She is indifferent to his needs."
  • not of good quality (which may imply average or poor quality depending upon context) — as in "an indifferent performance"
  • impartial — as in "We need a judge who is indifferent."
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library15 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 13
Web Links
insolent
6 uses
Wherever he went in camp, he would encounter insolent and lingeringly cruel stares.
insolent = rudely disrespectful
Word Statistics
Book6 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3
Web Links
oblige
13 uses
1  —13 uses as in:
I am obliged by law.
Thus, many men of courage ... would be obliged to desert the colors and scurry like chickens.
obliged = required
DefinitionGenerally this sense of oblige means:
require (obligate) to do something
Word Statistics
Book13 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
ominous
6 uses
A house standing placidly in distant fields had to him an ominous look.
ominous = threatening or suggestive of bad things to come
DefinitionGenerally ominous means:
threatening (suggestive of, or foreshadowing bad things to come)
Word Statistics
Book6 uses
Library10 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 12
Web Links
perfunctory
2 uses
A few shot perfunctorily at distant marks.
perfunctorily = without much interest or effort
DefinitionGenerally perfunctory means:
done without much interest or effort — especially as when dispensing with a formality
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 23
Web Links
petulant
1 use
"Thunder!" he remarked petulantly.
petulantly = with unreasonable anger or upset
DefinitionGenerally petulant means:
unreasonably annoyed or upset

or:

easily annoyed or upset
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 14
Web Links
profound
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
profound sadness
Shame was upon him, and with it profound regret that he was, perhaps, no more to be counted in the ranks of his fellows.
profound = of greatest intensity or emotional depth
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 23
Web Links
remonstrate
2 uses
The soft air was filled with the tremendous remonstrance.
remonstrance = argument in protest or opposition
DefinitionGenerally remonstrate means:
argue, complain, or criticize
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 12
Web Links
reproach
8 uses
The news that the regiment had been reproached went along the line.
reproached = criticized
DefinitionGenerally reproach means:
a criticism; or to express criticism — especially where a relationship makes the disapproval result in disappointment or shame
Word Statistics
Book8 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
resolve   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 7 uses
1  —4 uses as in:
I resolved to stop drinking.
He must accumulate information of himself, and meanwhile he resolved to remain close upon his guard lest those qualities of which he knew nothing should everlastingly disgrace him.
resolved = decided
DefinitionGenerally this sense of resolve means:
to decide — typically a firm or formal decision
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
2  —3 uses as in:
Her resolve weakened.
They seemed resolved to make every trouble.
resolved = determined
DefinitionGenerally this sense of resolve means:
firmness of purpose (strong determination to do something)
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 7
Web Links
stolid
8 uses
The youth walked stolidly into the midst of the mob, and with his flag in his hands took a stand as if he expected an attempt to push him to the ground.
stolidly = with little emotion

(editor's note:  Stolidly also lends to an image of moving slowly and standing firmly)
DefinitionGenerally stolid means:
having or revealing little emotion — sometimes indicating qualities of not changing or being dependable

or (much more rarely):

of an object:  not interesting — often large and unmoving
Word Statistics
Book8 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 7
Web Links
tranquil
6 uses
He stood, erect and tranquil, watching the attack begin against apart of the line that made a blue curve along the side of an adjacent hill.
tranquil = calm and undisturbed
Word Statistics
Book6 uses
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
vindicate
4 uses
A moral vindication was regarded by the youth as a very important thing.
vindication = to be shown to be right or justified in taking prior action

(editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
DefinitionGenerally vindicate means:
show to be right or justified
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
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