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Rebecca
Vocabulary

Extra Credit Words with Typical Sample Sentences

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acute   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 2 uses
1  —1 use as in:
acute pain
She felt an acute pain in her neck.
acute = sharp (a severely negative event) — often with a rapid onset
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
an acute angle
Roofs at acute angles are common in snow country.
acute angles = sharp; or an angle measuring between 0 and 90 degrees
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 15
Web Links
austere
4 uses
He took a vow of silence and leads an austere life at the monastery.
austere = lacking luxury (and stern)
DefinitionGenerally austere means:
a notable absence of luxury, comfort, or decoration

or:

of a person:  stern in manner; or practicing great self-denial
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 16
Web Links
complacent
4 uses
He had become complacent after years of success.
complacent = contented (unworried and satisfied) — often to a fault
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
convey
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
convey her thoughts
Please convey my gratitude for her hospitality.
convey = communicate or express
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 24
Web Links
degrade
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
degraded the quality
The factory degrades local air quality.
degrades = to decrease the value of something
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 16
Web Links
deride
3 uses
Critics derided her as unprofessional.
derided = laughed at or made fun of—while showing a lack of respect
DefinitionGenerally deride means:
laugh at or make fun of—while showing a lack of respect
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
disdain
1 use
She tries to be polite, but cannot hide her disdain for authority.
disdain = lack of respect
DefinitionGenerally disdain means:
a lack of respect — often suggesting distaste and an undeserved sense of superiority

or:

to reject as not good enough
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 12
Web Links
dubious
1 use
She was dubious, but agreed to come with us anyway.
dubious = doubtful; or suspicious; or full of uncertainty
DefinitionGenerally dubious means:
doubtful — such as:
  • uncertain that something can be relied upon
  • uncertain about the quality or wisdom of something
  • a relatively gentle way of saying that the quality of something described as good is in such doubt that it is considered bad
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 11
Web Links
efface
1 use
She always effaces herself when she is with him.
effaces = make herself inconspicuous or unimportant
DefinitionGenerally efface means:
remove completely from recognition or memory — sometimes by erasing

or:

to make oneself inconspicuous or unimportant
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 7
Web Links
engender
1 use
The police in Mexico don't engender confidence.
engender = cause
DefinitionGenerally engender means:
cause — usually a feeling (possibly a situation)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
futile
3 uses
It was a futile effort that was doomed form the start.
futile = effort that is pointless because it is unproductive or unsuccessful
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3
Web Links
inquest
19 uses
The coroner's inquest ruled the death a homicide.
inquest = formal inquiry or investigation
DefinitionGenerally inquest means:
a formal inquiry or investigation — typically into the cause of an unexpected death or other undesirable event
Word Statistics
Book19 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 22
Web Links
magistrate
9 uses
The local magistrate insisted on a cash payment for the speeding ticket.
magistrate = judicial official
DefinitionGenerally magistrate means:
a judicial official — in the U.S. typically a judge for minor offenses or preliminary hearings
Word Statistics
Book9 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 24
Web Links
philanthropy
1 use
Her primary interests are family and philanthropy.
philanthropy = helping others
DefinitionGenerally philanthropy means:
helping others — especially donating money to worthy causes; or an organization that does so
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 6
Web Links
prodigal
1 use
The rainforest is filled with a prodigal variety of vegetation.
prodigal = abundant (many, many kinds)
DefinitionGenerally prodigal means:
recklessly wasteful

or more rarely:

abundant (extravagant in amount)

or more rarely still:

long absent (someone who has been away a long time)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 7
Web Links
profuse
3 uses
It grows profusely in this area.
profusely = abundantly
DefinitionGenerally profuse means:
abundant (a lot of something)
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 7
Web Links
sultry
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
a sultry afternoon
It was a sultry afternoon. I could barely breath.
sultry = hot and humid
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 19
Web Links
superficial
2 uses
She has only superficial knowledge on the subject.
superficial = relating to a surface rather than to anything deep or penetrating (often of injuries or thinking)
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
veracity
1 use
I can vouch for her veracity.
veracity = truthfulness
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 24
Web Links
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