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The Odyssey by Homer (translated by: Butcher & Lang)
Vocabulary

Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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Agamemnon
26 uses
Then among them the father of gods and men began to speak, for he bethought him in his heart of noble Aegisthus, whom the son of Agamemnon, far-famed Orestes, slew.†
Agamemnon = Greek mythology:  the king who lead the Greeks against Troy in the Trojan War
Word Statistics
Book26 uses
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useIntr.
Web Links
antithesis
1 use
In the age of Anne, 'dignity' and 'correctness' had to be given to Homer, and Pope gave them by aid of his dazzling rhetoric, his antitheses, his nettete, his command of every conventional and favourite artifice.†
antitheses = exact opposite
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st usePref.
Web Links
Aphrodite
11 uses
And for his son he was bringing to his home the daughter of Alector out of Sparta, for his well-beloved son, strong Megapenthes,{*} born of a slave woman, for the gods no more showed promise of seed to Helen, from the day that she bare a lovely child, Hermione, as fair as golden Aphrodite.†
Aphrodite = Greek mythology:  goddess of love and beauty
Word Statistics
Book11 uses
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useBook 4
Web Links
askance
1 use
Then Odysseus of many counsels looked askance at him, and said: 'If indeed thou dost avow thee to be the soothsayer of these men, thou art like to have often prayed in the halls that the issue of a glad return might be far from me, and that my dear wife should follow thee and bear thee children; wherefore thou shalt not escape the bitterness of death.'†
askance = with disapproval or distrust; or directed to one side
DefinitionGenerally askance means:
with disapproval, distrust, or suspicion

or:

directed to one side — especially a sideways glance
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useBook 22
Web Links
chronological
1 use
The reader has now before him a chronologically arranged sketch of the action of the Odyssey.†
chronologically = arranged according to time
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useIntr.
Web Links
cogent
1 use
As to the mode of composition, it would not be difficult to show that at least the a priori Wolfian arguments against the early use of writing for literary purposes have no longer the cogency which they were once thought to possess.†
cogency = powerfully persuasive
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useIntr.
Web Links
craven
4 uses
Now when he had slain him, he made a funeral feast to the Argives over his hateful mother, and over the craven Aegisthus.†
craven = exceedingly cowardly; or someone who is exceedingly cowardly
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useBook 2
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denotes
1 use
{* Mr. Evelyn Abbott of Balliol College has suggested to us that [Greek] and [Greek] are here correlatives, and denote respectively the parts of host and of guest.†
denote = means literally; or indicates
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useBook 4
Web Links
dissemble
1 use
Shall I dissemble or shall I speak the truth?†
dissemble = deceive (hide or disguise the truth without outright lying)
DefinitionGenerally dissemble means:
to deceive (hide or disguise the truth without outright lying)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useBook 4
Web Links
elucidate
2 uses
It is hoped that the Introduction added to the second edition may illustrate the growth of those national legends on which Homer worked, and may elucidate the plot of the Odyssey.†
elucidate = explain (make clear)
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st usePref.
Web Links
enjoin
2 uses
So, when he had declared all that had been enjoined him, he went on his way to the swine and left the enclosure and the hall.†
enjoined = to command someone to do (or not do) something
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useBook 11
Web Links
expound
1 use
Even then the goodly Odysseus awoke where he slept on his native land; nor knew he the same again, having now been long afar, for around him the goddess had shed a mist, even Pallas Athene, daughter of Zeus, to the end that she might make him undiscovered for that he was, and might expound to him all things, that so his wife should not know him neither his townsmen and kinsfolk, ere the wooers had paid for all their transgressions.†
expound = explain or discuss in detail
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useBook 13
Web Links
forthwith
9 uses
But come, bid us to bed, that forthwith we may take our joy of rest beneath the spell of sleep.'†
forthwith = immediately
DefinitionGenerally forthwith means:
immediately — (most typically seen in legal documents, formal use, or classic literature)
Word Statistics
Book9 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useBook 4
Web Links
Hephaestus
19 uses
And on either side stood golden hounds and silver, which Hephaestus wrought by his cunning, to guard the palace of great-hearted Alcinous, being free from death and age all their days.†
Hephaestus = Greek mythology:  the god of fire and metalworking who needed a stick to walk
Word Statistics
Book19 uses
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useBook 4
Web Links
iniquity
2 uses
Long ago when ye were children, ye marked not your fathers' telling, what manner of man was Odysseus among them, one that wrought no iniquity toward any man, nor spake aught unrighteous in the township, as is the wont of divine kings.†
iniquity = immorality; or an immoral act
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useBook 22
Web Links
parley
1 use
They had gone forth to the session and the place of parley of the people.†
parley = a negotiation or discussion — especially between enemies
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useBook 15
Web Links
porous
3 uses
And of the henchmen and the ready squires, some were mixing for them wine and water in bowls, and some again were washing the tables with porous sponges and were setting them forth, and others were carving flesh in plenty.†
porous = allowing passage through a barrier
DefinitionGenerally porous means:
allowing passage through a barrier — in various senses such as:
  • of a membrane, asphalt or other material:  full of tiny holes so as to permit penetration by a fluid or gas
  • of a border or other barrier to people:  permitting illegal crossing
  • of a law or other rules:  full of loopholes
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useBook 1
Web Links
portent
2 uses
The reader will observe a series of portents, prophecies, and omens, which grow more numerous and admonishing as their doom draws nearer to the wooers.†
portents = signs of things about to happen
DefinitionGenerally portent means:
a sign of something about to happen
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useIntr.
Web Links
remiss
1 use
}' "Art thou so very foolish, stranger, and feeble-witted, or art thou wilfully remiss, and hast pleasure in suffering?†
remiss = careless — especially with regard to a duty
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useBook 4
Web Links
tempestuous
1 use
And as when a great tempestuous wind tosseth a heap of parched husks, and scatters them this way and that, even so did the wave scatter the long beams of the raft.†
tempestuous = strongly turbulent — as of a storm or unstable emotions
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useBook 5
Web Links
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