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O Pioneers!
Vocabulary

Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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amiable
1 use
He dropped his arms and went up to the wagon, smiling amiably and looking at them out of his pale blue eyes.
amiably = in a friendly way
DefinitionGenerally amiable means:
friendly and kindly
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.3
Web Links
contrary
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
a contrary personality
She'd marry him out of contrariness."†
contrariness = disagreeableness
DefinitionGenerally this sense of contrary means:
disagreeable — typically in reference to someone's personality
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 2.10
Web Links
corpulent
1 use
Mrs. Bergson was a fair-skinned, corpulent woman, heavy and placid like her son, Oscar, but there was something comfortable about her; perhaps it was her own love of comfort.†
corpulent = excessive body fat
DefinitionGenerally corpulent means:
with excessive body fat
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.2
Web Links
denotes
1 use
Maybe there's some young lady in Lincoln, now, very grand,"—Amedee waved his hand languidly before his face to denote the fan of heartless beauty,—"and you lost your heart up there.†
denote = means literally; or indicates
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 2.9
Web Links
despair
6 uses
It seemed strange that ... the feeling which gave one of them such happiness should bring the other such despair.
despair = distress
DefinitionGenerally despair means:
hopelessness
Word Statistics
Book6 uses
Library27 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 2.7
Web Links
digress
1 use
Lou felt that they were wandering from the point, and that in digression Alexandra might unnerve him.
digression = wandering of topic

(editor's note:  unnerve him means to make him lose confidence)
DefinitionGenerally digress means:
wander from a direct or straight course — especially verbally
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.10
Web Links
earnest
7 uses
Alexandra asked Signa whether she thought Nelse was in earnest,
earnest = serious
DefinitionGenerally earnest means:
characterized by sincere belief

or:

intensely or excessively serious
Word Statistics
Book7 uses
Library20 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 1.4
Web Links
enigma
1 use
But this land was an enigma.
enigma = mystery that seems unexplainable
DefinitionGenerally enigma means:
something mysterious that seems unexplainable
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.2
Web Links
incessant
1 use
While she and Alexandra patched and pieced and quilted, she talked incessantly about stories she read in a Swedish family paper,
incessantly = continuously
DefinitionGenerally incessant means:
continuous — often in an annoying way
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3.1
Web Links
indeterminate
1 use
The record of the plow was insignificant, like the feeble scratches on stone left by prehistoric races, so indeterminate that they may, after all, be only the markings of glaciers, and not a record of human strivings.†
indeterminate = unknown or uncertain
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.2
Web Links
indifferent
1 use
Angelique did not speak with much anxiety, not because she was indifferent, but because she felt so secure in their good fortune.
indifferent = uninterested
DefinitionGenerally indifferent means:
without interest — in various senses such as:
  • unconcerned
  • unsympathetic
  • impartial
  • not of good quality (which may imply average or poor quality depending upon context)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library19 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4.4
Web Links
insipid
2 uses
She made a yellow jam of the insipid ground-cherries that grew on the prairie, flavoring it with lemon peel;
insipid = lacking flavor
DefinitionGenerally insipid means:
dull (uninteresting and unimpactful)
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.2
Web Links
instigate
1 use
He pushed back his chair, took his hat from the nail, and marched out with Emil, who, with his university ideas, was supposed to have instigated the silo.†
instigated = started something or caused it to happen
DefinitionGenerally instigate means:
start or set into motion — typically some kind of conflict
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.2
Web Links
intangible
1 use
After I got away, it was all too delicate, too intangible, to write about.†
intangible = incapable of being perceived by the senses; or something that is hard to identify
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 5.3
Web Links
petulant
1 use
"I'm angry with you, Emil," she broke out with petulance.
petulance = unreasonably upset
DefinitionGenerally petulant means:
unreasonably annoyed or upset

or:

easily annoyed or upset
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4.1
Web Links
revere
1 use
The new communicants, with their clear, reverent faces, were beautiful to look upon as they entered in a body and took the front benches reserved for them.
reverent = (religiously) respectful and admiring

(editor's note:  a communicant is a participant in the Christian religious ceremony of receiving Holy Communion)
DefinitionGenerally revere means:
regard with feelings of deep respect and admiration — sometimes with a mixture of wonder and awe or fear
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library12 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 4.6
Web Links
sanguine
1 use
He was not very sanguine about his future.
sanguine = confidently optimistic and cheerful
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4.3
Web Links
scrupulous
1 use
He married an unscrupulous woman,
unscrupulous = unethical
DefinitionGenerally scrupulous means:
careful to behave ethically and/or diligently (with great care and attention to detail)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4.3
Web Links
staid
1 use
he seems kind of staid and school-teachery.
staid = conservative and low-keyed (probably dull)
DefinitionGenerally staid means:
respectable or conservative, and low-keyed in behavior — possibly a bit dull
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.8
Web Links
vacillate
1 use
The younger boy was quicker, but vacillating.
vacillating = changing his mind back and forth between conflicting ideas
DefinitionGenerally vacillate means:
to change one's mind back and forth between conflicting ideas

or:

to sway back and forth
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.2
Web Links
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