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Notes from the Underground

Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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affectation
3 uses
I bet you think I am writing all this from affectation, to be witty at the expense of men of action; and what is more, that from ill-bred affectation, I am clanking a sword like my officer.†
affectation = behaving in an artificial way to make an impression
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.2
Web Links
altercation
1 use
We have met here, a company of friends, for a farewell dinner to a comrade and you carry on an altercation," said Trudolyubov, rudely addressing himself to me alone.†
altercation = a noisy argument, confrontation, or fight
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 2.4
Web Links
askance
1 use
Apollon, who had already sat down to his work and put on his spectacles again, at first glanced askance at the money without speaking or putting down his needle; then, without paying the slightest attention to me or making any answer, he went on busying himself with his needle, which he had not yet threaded.†
askance = with disapproval or distrust; or directed to one side
DefinitionGenerally askance means:
with disapproval, distrust, or suspicion

or:

directed to one side — especially a sideways glance
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.9
Web Links
conducive
1 use
And why are you so firmly, so triumphantly, convinced that only the normal and the positive—in other words, only what is conducive to welfare—is for the advantage of man?†
conducive = contributing (to a result)
DefinitionGenerally conducive means:
contribute (help lead to a result)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 1.9
Web Links
corpulent
1 use
One could see that by the time he was thirty he would be corpulent.†
corpulent = excessive body fat
DefinitionGenerally corpulent means:
with excessive body fat
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.3
Web Links
digress
2 uses
But here let me make a digression.†
digression = a wandering from a direct or straight course — especially verbally

(editor's note:  The suffix "-sion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in admission from admit, discussion from discuss, and invasion from invade.)
DefinitionGenerally digress means:
wander from a direct or straight course — typically verbally
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.1
Web Links
disdain
4 uses
Those moans express in the first place all the aimlessness of your pain, which is so humiliating to your consciousness; the whole legal system of nature on which you spit disdainfully, of course, but from which you suffer all the same while she does not.†
disdainfully = with a lack of respect; or with a sense of superiority
DefinitionGenerally disdain means:
a lack of respect — often suggesting distaste and an undeserved sense of superiority

or:

to reject as not good enough
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 1.4
Web Links
edify
1 use
All human actions will then, of course, be tabulated according to these laws, mathematically, like tables of logarithms up to 108,000, and entered in an index; or, better still, there would be published certain edifying works of the nature of encyclopaedic lexicons, in which everything will be so clearly calculated and explained that there will be no more incidents or adventures in the world.†
edifying = instructive
DefinitionGenerally edify means:
to instruct — morally or intellectually
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.7
Web Links
expound
1 use
I was already longing to expound the cherished ideas I had brooded over in my corner.†
expound = explain or discuss in detail
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.6
Web Links
hackneyed
1 use
It was not wounded vanity that drove me to it, and for God's sake do not thrust upon me your hackneyed remarks, repeated to nausea, that "I was only a dreamer," while they even then had an understanding of life.†
hackneyed = lacking impact due to too much previous exposure — especially writing that is unimaginative and filled with overused expressions, ideas, and formulas
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.3
Web Links
incognito
1 use
Maybe it will begin to revenge itself, too, but, as it were, piecemeal, in trivial ways, from behind the stove, incognito, without believing either in its own right to vengeance, or in the success of its revenge, knowing that from all its efforts at revenge it will suffer a hundred times more than he on whom it revenges itself, while he, I daresay, will not even scratch himself.†
incognito = with identity hidden — such as via a disguise or false name
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.3
Web Links
ineffable
1 use
So, then, he felt himself ineffably superior to me in every respect!†
ineffably = something that cannot be put into words
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.4
Web Links
insolent
7 uses
Twice two makes four seems to me simply a piece of insolence.†
insolence = rude, disrespectful behavior or action
DefinitionGenerally insolent means:
rudely disrespectful
Word Statistics
Book7 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.4
Web Links
integral
1 use
I could not live in furnished lodgings: my lodging was my private solitude, my shell, my cave, in which I concealed myself from all mankind, and Apollon seemed to me, for some reason, an integral part of that flat, and for seven years I could not turn him away.†
integral = an essential part or characteristic
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 2.8
Web Links
interpose
1 use
But you know there is no such thing as choice in reality, say what you like," you will interpose with a chuckle.†
interpose = insert between other elements; or to interrupt or stop action by others
DefinitionGenerally interpose means:
to insert between other elements; or to interrupt or stop action by others
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.8
Web Links
naivete
1 use
This naivete of expectation drove me to fury, but I restrained myself.†
naivete = lacking experience or sophistication
DefinitionGenerally naivete means:
inexperience, innocence, or lack of sophistication
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.9
Web Links
predilection
1 use
But man has such a predilection for systems and abstract deductions that he is ready to distort the truth intentionally, he is ready to deny the evidence of his senses only to justify his logic.†
predilection = preference or tendency
DefinitionGenerally predilection means:
preference (a predisposition in favor of something); or tendency (normal behavior)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.7
Web Links
superfluous
4 uses
I recalled, too, that during those two hours I had not said a single word to this creature, and had, in fact, considered it utterly superfluous; in fact, the silence had for some reason gratified me.†
superfluous = more than is needed, desired, or required
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.7
Web Links
supposition
2 uses
So far, you know, this is only your supposition.†
supposition = something supposed (rather than something known to be so)
DefinitionGenerally supposition means:
something supposed (rather than something known to be so) — especially when others doubt that reality
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.9
Web Links
transfigure
1 use
At last all confusion, transfigured, trembling and sobbing, she flings herself at my feet and says that I am her saviour, and that she loves me better than anything in the world.†
transfigured = completely changed the nature or appearance of
DefinitionGenerally transfigure means:
change completely the nature or appearance of — especially in a positive way
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.8
Web Links
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Sample usage followed by this mark was not checked by an editor. Please let us know if you spot a problem.
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