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My Antonia

Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

instructions
apparent
8 uses
This remedy worked, apparently.
apparently = seemingly (appearing to be obvious—though not necessarily so)

(editor's note:  Since the author didn't use a stronger adverb such as clearly or obviously, she is indicating that we don't know for sure the patient would not have recovered without aid of the medicine or that the patient may only seem better prior to getting worse again.)
DefinitionGenerally apparent means:
clear or obvious; or appearing as such but not necessarily so
Word Statistics
Book8 uses
Library66 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useBook 1
Web Links
deride
1 use
in spite of our derision she cherished a belief that Christ was born in Bohemia a short time before the Shimerdas left that country.
derision = critical disrespect — typically while laughing at or making fun of

(editor's note:  The suffix "-sion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in admission from admit, discussion from discuss, and invasion from invade.)
DefinitionGenerally deride means:
to criticize with strong disrespect — often
with humor
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useBook 2
Web Links
deter
1 use
Often she was tempted to tell Martha that the child must be kept at home, but somehow the memory of his foolish, happy face deterred her.
deterred = prevented
DefinitionGenerally deter means:
try to prevent; or prevent
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useBook 2
Web Links
doleful
1 use
The tunes were either very lively or very doleful, and he sang words to some of them.
doleful = full of sadness
DefinitionGenerally doleful means:
expressing or causing sadness
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useBook 1
Web Links
duplicity
1 use
As they went up the hill he kept glancing at her sidewise, to see whether she got his point, or how she received it. I noticed later that he always looked at people sidewise ... This trick did not suggest duplicity or secretiveness, but merely long habit,
duplicity = deception — such as lying
DefinitionGenerally duplicity means:
deception (lying to or misleading others) — usually over an extended period
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useBook 5
Web Links
earnest
6 uses
...and said, with an earnestness which I shall never forget, "Te-e-ach, te-e-ach my Antonia!"
earnestness = seriousness

(Editor's note:  The suffix "-ness" converts an adjective to a noun that means the quality of. This is the same pattern you see in words like darkness, kindness, and coolness.)
DefinitionGenerally earnest means:
characterized by sincere belief

or:

intensely or excessively serious
Word Statistics
Book6 uses
Library19 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useBook 1
Web Links
establish
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
establish a positive tone
One of them he had taken to Omaha and established in the business for which he had fitted her.†
established = settled
DefinitionGenerally this sense of establish means:
create, start, or set in [a] place
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library25 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useBook 2
Web Links
fastidious
1 use
He was so fastidious and prim about his place that a boy would go to a good deal of trouble to throw a dead cat into his back yard, or to dump a sackful of tin cans in his alley.
fastidious = excessively concerned with cleanliness
DefinitionGenerally fastidious means:
giving careful attention to detail

or:

excessively concerned with cleanliness or matters of taste
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useBook 2
Web Links
grave
4 uses
"Then I have misjudged you, and I ask your pardon"—he bowed gravely.
gravely = in a serious and solemn manner
DefinitionGenerally this sense of grave means:
serious and/or solemn
The exact meaning of this sense of grave can depend upon its context. For example:
  • "This is a grave problem," or "a situation of the utmost gravity." — important, dangerous, or causing worry
  • "She was in a grave mood upon returning from the funeral." — sad or solemn
  • "She looked me in the eye and gravely promised." — in a sincere and serious manner
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library15 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useBook 1
Web Links
illustrate
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
an illustrated children's book
Cuzak had brought home with him a roll of illustrated Bohemian papers.†
illustrated = accompanied by drawings
DefinitionGenerally this sense of illustrate means:
to draw pictures (or provide photographs) to accompany a book or other writing
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useBook 5
Web Links
laconic
1 use
He did not say anything for a minute, but scratched his head and turned the snake over with his boot. "Where did you run onto that beauty, Jim?"
  "Up at the dog-town," I answered laconically.
laconically = in a manner that uses few words
DefinitionGenerally laconic means:
using few words
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useBook 1
Web Links
parsimonious
1 use
He was, I had discovered, parsimonious about small expenditures—a trait absolutely inconsistent with his general character.
parsimonious = extremely reluctant to spend money
DefinitionGenerally parsimonious means:
extreme reluctance to spend money or use resources
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useBook 3
Web Links
perfunctory
1 use
She could not be negative or perfunctory about anything.
perfunctory = without much interest or effort
DefinitionGenerally perfunctory means:
done without much interest or effort — especially as when dispensing with a formality
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useBook 2
Web Links
petulant
1 use
"You might have told me there was a
snake behind me!" I said petulantly.
petulantly = with unreasonable anger or upset
DefinitionGenerally petulant means:
unreasonably annoyed or upset

or:

easily annoyed or upset
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useBook 1
Web Links
reticent
1 use
She was quick at understanding the grandmothers who spoke no English, and the most reticent and distrustful of them would tell her their story without realizing they were doing so.
reticent = reluctant to speak freely
DefinitionGenerally reticent means:
reluctant — especially to speak freely
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useBook 2
Web Links
scrupulous
1 use
She looked bold and resourceful and unscrupulous, and she was all of these.
unscrupulous = unethical

(editor's note:  The prefix "un-" in unscrupulous means not and reverses the meaning of scrupulous. This is the same pattern you see in words like unhappy, unknown, and unlucky.)
DefinitionGenerally scrupulous means:
careful to behave ethically and/or diligently (with great care and attention to detail)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useBook 2
Web Links
supercilious
1 use
She liked me better from that time on, and she never took a supercilious air with me again.
supercilious = arrogant
DefinitionGenerally supercilious means:
arrogant (acting as if better, more important, and superior in ideas than others)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useBook 1
Web Links
taciturn
1 use
...but grandfather was naturally taciturn, and Jake and Otto were often so tired after supper that I used to feel as if I were surrounded by a wall of silence.
taciturn = with a tendency to be reserved and not to talk
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useBook 1
Web Links
venerate
1 use
I remember vividly another evening, when something led us to talk of Dante's veneration for Virgil.
veneration = feelings of respect and reverence

(editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
DefinitionGenerally venerate means:
regard with feelings of respect and reverence
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useBook 3
Web Links
zeal
1 use
I had never seen her so energetic; she was panting with zeal,
zeal = active interest and enthusiasm
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useBook 2
Web Links
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Sample usage followed by this mark was not checked by an editor. Please let us know if you spot a problem.
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