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Madame Bovary

Top-Ranked Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

instructions
alleviate
2 uses
Honour to those indefatigable spirits who consecrate their vigils to the amelioration or to the alleviation of their kind!
alleviation = diminishing of bad

(editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
DefinitionGenerally alleviate means:
to lessen something that is bad — especially to lessen pain
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.11
Web Links
augment
2 uses
On him alone, then, she concentrated all the various hatreds that resulted from her boredom, and every effort to diminish only augmented it; for this useless trouble was added to the other reasons for despair, and contributed still more to the separation between them.
augmented = enlarged or increased
DefinitionGenerally augment means:
enlarge or increase
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.5
Web Links
candid
3 uses
1  —3 uses as in:
your candid opinion
Her real beauty was in her eyes. Although brown, they seemed black because of the lashes, and her look came at you frankly, with a candid boldness.
candid = honest and direct
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 2.12
Web Links
capricious
2 uses
Emma was growing difficult, capricious.
capricious = impulsive or unpredictable
DefinitionGenerally capricious means:
impulsive or unpredictable or tending to make sudden changes — especially impulsive behavior
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.9
Web Links
contempt
3 uses
1  —3 uses as in:
feels contempt towards her
When he did come, she showed herself cold and almost contemptuous.
contemptuous = showing a lack of respect
DefinitionGenerally this sense of contempt means:
lack of respect for someone or something thought inferior — often accompanied by a feeling of dislike or disgust
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.8
Web Links
disdain
5 uses
"Oh," she replied bitterly, "they are poor charms since you disdained them."
disdained = rejected as not good enough
DefinitionGenerally disdain means:
a lack of respect — often suggesting distaste and an undeserved sense of superiority

or:

to reject as not good enough
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 2.11
Web Links
disparage
1 use
But the disparaging of those we love always alienates us from them to some extent.
disparaging = criticizing
DefinitionGenerally disparage means:
to criticize or make seem less important — especially in a disrespectful or contemptuous manner
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 3.6
Web Links
engender
2 uses
... all this must, in the long-run, engender a certain...
engender = cause
DefinitionGenerally engender means:
cause — usually a feeling (possibly a situation)
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.2
Web Links
impetuous
1 use
"There is still time!" he cried. "Reflect! perhaps you may repent!"

"Never!" she cried impetuously.
impetuously = impulsively (acting suddenly without much thought)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of impetuous means:
impulsive (acting suddenly without much thought) — often with an unfortunate consequence
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.12
Web Links
indolent
3 uses
Then he, from indolence, from laziness, went and took, hanging on its nail in my laboratory, the key of the Capharnaum.
indolence = laziness
DefinitionGenerally this sense of indolent means:
lazy; disinclined to work
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.9
Web Links
Monsieur
230 uses
Monsieur Canivet's a character!
Monsieur = Mr. (in French)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of Monsieur means:
French equivalent to the English Mr.

or:

French equivalent to saying sir in English (a polite way to address a male)
Word Statistics
Book230 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.8
Web Links
obstinate
5 uses
How obstinate you are sometimes!
obstinate = stubbornly not doing what others want
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.2
Web Links
pious
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
a good, pious woman
...everything that was then the fashion in the pious book trade.
pious = religious
DefinitionGenerally this sense of pious means:
religious or highly moral
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 1.6
Web Links
prodigal
2 uses
They were prodigal as kings, full of ideal, ambitious, fantastic frenzy.
prodigal = recklessly wasteful
DefinitionGenerally prodigal means:
recklessly wasteful

or more rarely:

abundant (extravagant in amount)

or more rarely still:

long absent (someone who has been away a long time)
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.9
Web Links
provincial
1 use
Then they talked about provincial mediocrity, of the lives it crushed, the illusions lost there.
provincial = unsophisticated
DefinitionGenerally this sense of provincial means:
unsophisticated (meant disapprovingly to refer to old-fashioned or narrow-minded attitudes and ideas)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.8
Web Links
prudent
3 uses
...but vanity getting the better of all prudence,
prudence = good sense and caution
DefinitionGenerally prudent means:
sensible and careful
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.15
Web Links
resignation
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
accepted it with resignation
And Charles, his head in his hands, went on in a broken voice, and with the resigned accent of infinite sorrow—.
resigned = having accepted something undesired as unavoidable
DefinitionGenerally this sense of resignation means:
acceptance of something undesired as unavoidable or the lesser of evils
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 3.11
Web Links
servile
2 uses
He obeyed then, but the strength of his desire protested against the servility of his conduct;
servility = submissiveness
DefinitionGenerally servile means:
submissive — typically excessively so (so submissive or eager to serve and please that one seems to have no self-respect)

or:

relating to the work that requires obeying demeaning commands

or:

slave-like or relating to slaves
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.2
Web Links
stoic
3 uses
After that she was silent, burying her anger in a dumb stoicism that she maintained till her death.
stoicism = a school of philosophy whose adherents try not to be affected by pleasure, pain, or emotions
DefinitionGenerally stoic means:
seeming unaffected by pleasure, pain, or emotions
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.1
Web Links
venerate
2 uses
At this time she had a cult for Mary Stuart and enthusiastic veneration for illustrious or unhappy women.
veneration = feelings of respect and reverence

(editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
DefinitionGenerally venerate means:
regard with feelings of respect and reverence
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.6
Web Links
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