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Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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accord
10 uses
1  —10 uses as in:
according to, or in accord with
"...to your sleep, lad, and I'll watch."  accordingly, I lay down to sleep;
accordingly = in keeping with (what was just said)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of accord means:
in keeping with; or in agreement/harmony/unity with
This sense of accord is often seen in the form according to or accordingly where it can take on more specific meanings. For example:
  • "According to Kim, ..." — as stated by
  • "To each according to her ability." — based upon
  • "Points are scored according to how well they perform." — depending upon
  • "The dose is calculated according to body weight." — in proportion to
  • "We got a flat tire. Accordingly, I pulled to the side of the road." — because of what was just said; or as a result
Word Statistics
Book10 uses
Library53 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 14
Web Links
approach
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
approached her with the proposal
Mr. Riach, perhaps from caution, would never suffer me to say another word about my story; the captain, whom I tried to approach, rebuffed me like a dog and would not hear a word; and as the days came and went, my heart sank lower and lower, till I was even glad of the work which kept me from thinking.†
approach = begin communication about something
DefinitionGenerally this sense of approach means:
to begin communication with someone about something — often a proposal or a delicate topic
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 8
Web Links
conjecture
1 use
But this is matter only for conjecture, things having gone otherwise than he forecast.
conjecture = speculation (to form a conclusion or opinion based on inconclusive evidence)
DefinitionGenerally conjecture means:
a conclusion or opinion based on inconclusive evidence; or the act of forming of such a conclusion or opinion
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 13
Web Links
consternation
1 use
In the others, as well as I could make out (standing back at a distance and hearing a strange tongue), the news was received with more of consternation than surprise.
consternation = dismay (unhappiness and worry)
DefinitionGenerally consternation means:
dismay (unhappiness, worry, and often confusion) — typically over something unexpected
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 20
Web Links
denounce
1 use
Now, whether my uncle thought the crash to be the sound of my fall, or whether he heard in it God's voice denouncing murder, I will leave you to guess.
denouncing = strongly criticizing
DefinitionGenerally denounce means:
to strongly criticize or accuse publicly

or more rarely:  to inform against someone (turn someone into the authorities)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
despondent
1 use
As the morning went on, and the fires began to be kindled, and the windows to open, and the people to appear out of the houses, my concern and despondency grew ever the blacker.
despondency = depression
DefinitionGenerally despondent means:
emotionally depressed — especially a feeling of grief and hopelessness after a loss
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 27
Web Links
earnest
9 uses
I looked to see if he were jesting; but no, the little man was in dead earnest;
earnest = sincerity
DefinitionGenerally earnest means:
characterized by sincere belief

or:

intensely or excessively serious
Word Statistics
Book9 uses
Library19 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 19
Web Links
enmity
1 use
There was now no doubt about my uncle's enmity; there was no doubt I carried my life in my hand, and he would leave no stone unturned that he might compass my destruction.
enmity = hostility (hatred)
DefinitionGenerally enmity means:
hatred toward someone or between people — typically long-lasting
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 5
Web Links
heresy
1 use
There, then, with uplifted forefinger, he first put me on my guard against a considerable number of heresies,
heresies = opinions or actions most people consider immoral
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
imperious
1 use
The first was a great, red-headed gentleman, of an imperious and flushed face, who...
imperious = arrogant or domineering
DefinitionGenerally imperious means:
expecting obedience; or arrogant; or domineering
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 17
Web Links
incessant
2 uses
Some seven hours' incessant, hard travelling brought us early in the morning to the end of a range of mountains.
incessant = continuous
DefinitionGenerally incessant means:
continuous — often in an annoying way
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 24
Web Links
indulgent
1 use
I told him I would give him no such thing, for neither he nor I was of an age for such indulgences.
indulgences = excessive enjoyments
DefinitionGenerally indulgent means:
to treat with extra kindness or tolerance
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 6
Web Links
notorious
1 use
There was but one thing happened worth narrating; and that is the visit I had of Robin Oig, one of the sons of the notorious Rob Roy.
notorious = well known for something bad

(editor's note:  "Rob Roy" was a famous Scottish folk hero and outlaw of the early 18th century, who is sometimes known as the Scottish Robin Hood.)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library9 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 25
Web Links
pedantic
1 use
Indeed he was more pedantic than I can represent him, and placed more scraps of Latin in his speech; but...
pedantic = with excessive concern for formal rules, details, or book learning
DefinitionGenerally pedantic means:
too concerned with formal rules, details, or book learning
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 27
Web Links
petulant
1 use
...and this piece of work was all about the petulance of a young ass that had been spoiled, and wanted nothing so much as to be tied up and soundly belted.
petulance = unreasonable annoyance or upset
DefinitionGenerally petulant means:
unreasonably annoyed or upset

or:

easily annoyed or upset
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 28
Web Links
prodigal
1 use
I trust you will be a good husband of your money; but in the affair of a friend like Mr. Thompson, I would be even prodigal.
prodigal = recklessly wasteful (in spending)

(editor's note:  In this context, husband means "to be economical" or "to spend carefully".)
DefinitionGenerally prodigal means:
recklessly wasteful

or more rarely:

abundant (extravagant in amount)

or more rarely still:

long absent (someone who has been away a long time)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 30
Web Links
prudent
1 use
But not three yards from shore, I plumped in head over ears; and if ever I was heard of more, it was rather by God's grace than my own prudence.
prudence = good sense and caution
DefinitionGenerally prudent means:
sensible and careful
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 14
Web Links
remonstrate
1 use
He showed me tattoo marks, baring his breast in the teeth of the wind and in spite of my remonstrances, for I thought it was enough to kill him;
remonstrances = arguments in protest or opposition
DefinitionGenerally remonstrate means:
argue, complain, or criticize
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 5
Web Links
revere
1 use
"Sir," says I, "with a proper reverence for your age and our common blood, I do not..."
reverence = feelings of respect and admiration
DefinitionGenerally revere means:
regard with feelings of deep respect and admiration — sometimes with a mixture of wonder and awe or fear
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library11 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 3
Web Links
tremulous
1 use
To be sure, I laughed over this; but it was rather tremulous laughter;
tremulous = nervous (quivering or shaky)
DefinitionGenerally tremulous means:
quivering (shaky) — usually from weakness or fear — especially of the voice
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
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Sample usage followed by this mark was not checked by an editor. Please let us know if you spot a problem.
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