toggle menu
menu
vocabulary
1000+ books
Book Menu

Jude the Obscure

Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

instructions
abnegate
1 use
But self-abnegation is the higher road.†
abnegation = renunciation (rejection) — often self-denial of luxuries

(editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
DefinitionGenerally abnegate means:
to renounce or reject
The exact meaning of abnegate can depend upon its context. For example:
  • "to abnegate his responsibilities as a father" — to reject or ignore a duty
  • "to practice self-abnegation" — to deny oneself (voluntarily give something up such as a luxury)
  • "to abnegate her faith" — to reject a belief
  • "to abnegate her legal rights" — to give up a claim, title, or position of power
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 6
Web Links
antagonism
2 uses
They would sit silent, more bodeful of the direct antagonism of things than of their insensate and stolid obstructiveness.†
antagonism = hostility or opposition
DefinitionGenerally antagonism means:
hostility, opposition, or tension between opposing forces or ideas
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 6
Web Links
antecedent
1 use
When they had passed up the church and were standing in their places Jude found that the antecedent visit had certainly taken off the edge of this performance, but by the time they were half-way on with the service he wished from his heart that he had not undertaken the business of giving her away.†
antecedent = something that happened previous to something else; or anything that precedes something
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 3
Web Links
arable
1 use
The only marks on the uniformity of the scene were a rick of last year's produce standing in the midst of the arable, the rooks that rose at his approach, and the path athwart the fallow by which he had come, trodden now by he hardly knew whom, though once by many of his own dead family.†
arable = capable of being farmed productively
DefinitionGenerally arable means:
of land:  capable of being farmed productively
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 1
Web Links
askance
1 use
Every householder looked askance at such a woman and child inquiring for accommodation in the gloom.†
askance = with disapproval or distrust; or directed to one side
DefinitionGenerally askance means:
with disapproval, distrust, or suspicion

or:

directed to one side — especially a sideways glance
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 6
Web Links
capacious
1 use
She produced five shillings, the price asked, and slipped the phial in her capacious bosom.†
capacious = large in capacity
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 5
Web Links
carouse
1 use
He thought it hardly worth while to call at the shop for his provisions at that hour, Donn and his daughter being probably not up, if they caroused late the night before.†
caroused = having fun with others in a noisy manner while drinking alcohol
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 6
Web Links
circuitous
1 use
At ten o'clock he came away, choosing a circuitous route homeward to pass the gates of the college whose head had just sent him the note.†
circuitous = indirect
DefinitionGenerally circuitous means:
indirect — while traveling somewhere, or in saying or doing something
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 2
Web Links
circumscribe
1 use
When the other travellers closed their eyes, which they did one by one—even the kitten curling itself up in the basket, weary of its too circumscribed play—the boy remained just as before.†
circumscribed = to restrict something within set limits; or draw a circle around or surround
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 5
Web Links
compunction
1 use
But she seemed timid at his approach, and compunction wrought on him at sight of it.†
compunction = guilt for a misdeed; or a feeling that it would be wrong to do something
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 6
Web Links
contiguous
3 uses
Children begin with detail, and learn up to the general; they begin with the contiguous, and gradually comprehend the universal.†
contiguous = with a common boundary; or very close in space or time
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 3
Web Links
convivial
2 uses
A few friends, and a quiet convivial party would be the thing, if we could get it up.†
convivial = friendly and fun
DefinitionGenerally convivial means:
friendly and fun — especially (when of a person) fond of the pleasures of good company
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 6
Web Links
corporeal
1 use
"Jude, I want you to kiss me, as a lover, incorporeally," she said, tremulously nestling up to him, with damp lashes.†
incorporeally = in a manner that lacks material or physical form

(Editor's note:  The prefix "in-" in incorporeally means not and reverses the meaning of corporeally. This is the same pattern you see in words like invisible, incomplete, and insecure.)
DefinitionGenerally corporeal means:
having material or physical form or substance

or:

regarding the body as opposed to the mind or spirit
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 5
Web Links
denizen
2 uses
He saw that his destiny lay not with these, but among the manual toilers in the shabby purlieu which he himself occupied, unrecognized as part of the city at all by its visitors and panegyrists, yet without whose denizens the hard readers could not read nor the high thinkers live.†
denizens = people or animals that inhabit or frequently visit a particular place
DefinitionGenerally denizen means:
a person or animal that inhabits or frequently visits a particular place
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 2
Web Links
epitaph
2 uses
He likewise heard some phrases spoken by the phantom with the short face, the genial Spectator: "When I look upon the tombs of the great, every motion of envy dies in me; when I read the epitaphs of the beautiful, every inordinate desire goes out; when I meet with the grief of parents upon a tombstone, my heart melts with compassion; when I see the tombs of the parents themselves, I consider the vanity of grieving for those whom we must quickly follow."†
epitaphs = short texts in memory of dead people
DefinitionGenerally epitaph means:
a short text in memory of a dead person — especially text written on a tombstone
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 2
Web Links
forgo   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 2 uses
1  —1 use
There seemed to him, vaguely and dimly, something wrong in a social ritual which made necessary a cancelling of well-formed schemes involving years of thought and labour, of foregoing a man's one opportunity of showing himself superior to the lower animals, and of contributing his units of work to the general progress of his generation, because of a momentary surprise by a new and transitory instinct which had nothing in it of the nature of vice, and could be only at the most called...†
foregoing = doing without

(editor's note:  This is more commonly spelled foregoing.)
DefinitionGenerally forgo means:
do without
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 1
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
a foregone conclusion
The favourable light in which this new thought showed itself by contrast with his foregone intentions cheered Jude, as he sat there, shabby and lonely; and it may be said to have given, during the next few days, the coup de grace to his intellectual career—a career which had extended over the greater part of a dozen years.†
foregone = done in the past
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 3
Web Links
pathos
2 uses
A pathos so unusually compounded as that which attached to this hour was unlikely to repeat itself for years, if ever, and Jude would have paused, and meditated, and conversed.†
pathos = a quality that arouses pity or sorrow
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 3
Web Links
supercilious
2 uses
Thus they descended to the precincts of her father's homestead, and Arabella went in, nodding good-bye to him with a supercilious, affronted air.†
supercilious = arrogant
DefinitionGenerally supercilious means:
arrogant (acting as if better, more important, and superior in ideas than others)
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 3
Web Links
temerity
2 uses
How could Sue have had the temerity to ask him to do it—a cruelty possibly to herself as well as to him?†
temerity = boldness to say something others consider rude or upsetting
DefinitionGenerally temerity means:
boldness — typically to say something others consider rude or upsetting
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePart 3
Web Links
Go to Book Menu
Take Pre-Reading Quiz
† 
Sample usage followed by this mark was not checked by an editor. Please let us know if you spot a problem.
SAT® is a registered trademark of the College Board, which is not affiliated with verbalworkout.com™, and does not endorse this site.