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Into the Wild

Top-Ranked Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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accompany   (3 meanings)
3 meanings, 6 uses
1  —1 use as in:
accompany on the journey
His big dream, originally, was to go off and live in the woods with some beautiful woman. He was hot for at least a couple of different girls who worked with us, and he spent a lot of time and energy trying to talk Sue or Barbara or whoever into accompanying him, which in itself was pretty much pure fantasyland.
accompanying = traveling with
From page 83.6  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of accompany means:
to travel along with
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library9 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 10
1st useChapter 8, p.83.6
Web Links
2  —2 uses as in:
illness and accompanying symptoms
Some people who have been brought back from the far edge of starvation, though, report that near the end the hunger vanishes, the terrible pain dissolves, and the suffering is replaced by a sublime euphoria, a sense of calm accompanied by transcendent mental clarity.
accompanied = joined at the same time
From page 198.9  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of accompany means:
to be present with at the same time and/or location
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library9 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 10
1st useChapter 15, p.154.8
Web Links
3  —1 use as in:
accompanied her in the performance
He'd sing numbers like 'Tender Is the Night' while I accompanied him on piano.
accompanied = performed with
From page 110.1  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of accompany means:
to perform with
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library9 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 10
1st useChapter 11, p.110.1
Web Links
unquizzed meaning  —2 uses
approach   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 8 uses
1  —1 use as in:
use the best approach
I'd learned by then that a direct approach, 'By God, you better not try a stunt like that again!', didn't work with Chris.
approach = technique (way of doing something)
From page 119.2  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of approach means:
a way of doing something; or a route that leads to a particular place
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 12, p.119.2
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
approached her with the proposal
One of their neighbors was the director of the U.S. Defense Intelligence Agency, and Walt approached this man, an army general, for advice.
approached = began talking with
From page 31.6  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of approach means:
to begin communication with someone about something — often a proposal or a delicate topic
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4, p.31.6
Web Links
unquizzed meaning  —6 uses
consequence   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 5 uses
1  —4 uses as in:
a direct consequence of
From all the available evidence, there seemed to be little doubt that McCandless, rash and incautious by nature, had committed a careless blunder, confusing one plant for another, and died as a consequence.
consequence = result
From page 192.4  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of consequence means:
a result of something (often an undesired side effect)
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library28 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 6, p.47.1
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
of little consequence
It was an uncharacteristic break from his cover that might easily have alerted his parents to his whereabouts, although the lapse proved to be of no consequence because the private investigator hired by Walt and Billie never caught the slip.
consequence = importance
From page 40.1  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of consequence means:
importance or relevance
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 5, p.40.1
Web Links
correspond   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 6 uses
1  —4 uses as in:
corresponding by email
Everett Ruess's correspondence reveals uncanny parallels between Ruess and Chris McCandless.
correspondence = written letters
From page 91.4  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of correspond means:
communicate by writing letters or email
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useA.N., p.iii.5
Web Links
2  —2 uses as in:
foreign correspondent of the paper
"Personally I see nothing positive at all about Chris McCandless's lifestyle or wilderness doctrine," scolded another correspondent.
correspondent = reporter
From page 71.3  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of correspondent means:
a reporter — typically from a foreign country or with a particular expertise
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 8, p.71.3
Web Links
establish   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 5 uses
1  —4 uses as in:
establish a positive tone
Contrary to common belief, however, the bus doesn't lie beneath any established flight path, and very few planes fly over it.
established = standard (set in place)
From page 198.4  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of establish means:
create, start, or set in [a] place
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library25 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 8, p.76.4
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
establish that there is a need
Evidence unearthed by the forty-odd expeditions sent to search for them eventually established that all had perished, the victims of scurvy, starvation, and unspeakable suffering.
established = showed
From page 181.4  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of establish means:
show or determine (cause to be recognized or figure out)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 17, p.181.4
Web Links
highlight
7 uses
1  —7 uses as in:
highlights with a yellow marker
Several such passages are starred and highlighted in the dog-eared text, the margins filled with cryptic notes printed in McCandless's distinctive hand.
highlighted = marked as important
From page 65.9  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of highlight means:
to mark important text; or the text that is marked — typically marked using a felt-tip pen with a bright, transparent ink in order to reinforce memory and assist later review
Word Statistics
Book7 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3, p.15.3
Web Links
passage
10 uses
He had just finished reading Doctor Zhivago, a book that incited him to scribble excited notes in the margins and underline several passages:
passages = short parts of a longer written work
From page 188.7  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of passage means:
a short part of a longer written work
Word Statistics
Book10 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 7, p.65.9
Web Links
perspective   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 3 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
Look at it from her perspective
And now he'd slipped painlessly out of Ron Franz's life as well. Painlessly, that is, from McCandless's perspective, although not from the old man's.
perspective = way of seeing and thinking about things
From page 55.8  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of perspective means:
a particular way of seeing or thinking about things
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 6, p.55.8
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
Keep it in perspective
Although he castigated himself severely for this waste of a life he'd taken, a day later McCandless appeared to regain some perspective, for his journal notes, "henceforth will learn to accept my errors, however great they be."
perspective = a sensible view
From page 167.4  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of perspective means:
a sensible view of a situation that considers its different parts in a balanced way
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 16, p.167.4
Web Links
relevant
1 use
Attempting to learn who owned the car, the rangers sent out a bulletin over the Teletype to relevant law-enforcement agencies and...
relevant = related in a meaningful way to the issue in question

(editor's note:  In this case, "relevant law-enforcement agencies" might include those in the area indicated by the license plate, or any that specialize in identifying vehicle ownership, etc.)
From page 26.9  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally relevant means:
relating in a meaningful way to the issue in question
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 10
1st useChapter 4, p.26.9
Web Links
sustain   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 4 uses
1  —3 uses as in:
sustained by her faith
This, I figured, could sustain me for three or four more days if need be, but then what would I do?
sustain = support (provide necessities for)
From page 140.7  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of sustain means:
provide support or necessities
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 17, p.184.3
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
sustained through the ages
He sustained a perfect 4.0 grade-point average through high school and college.
sustained = maintained through time
From page 73.9  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of sustain means:
to continue through time
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 8, p.73.9
Web Links
yield   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 4 uses
1  —3 uses as in:
will yield valuable data
It may, after all, be the bad habit of creative talents to invest themselves in pathological extremes that yield remarkable insights but no durable way of life for those who cannot translate their psychic wounds into significant art or thought.
yield = produce
From page 70.1  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of yield means:
to produce (usually something wanted); or the thing or amount produced
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 18, p.192.9
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
yield to pressure
I aimed for another spot, and once again it glanced off unyielding diorite with a dull clank.
unyielding = hard

(editor's note: This sense of yielding means "giving way". The prefix un- means not and reverses the  meaning as it does in unlikely and unsatisfactory. So something that does not give way is hard.)
From page 153.3  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of yield means:
to give in, give way, or give up
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library14 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 15, p.153.3
Web Links
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