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The Iliad by Homer - (translated by: Butler)

Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

instructions
accord
9 uses
1  —5 uses as in:
done of her own accord
First he asked Nestor and King Idomeneus, then the two Ajaxes and the son of Tydeus, and sixthly Ulysses, peer of gods in counsel; but Menelaus came of his own accord, for he knew how busy his brother then was.†
own accord = own mind — voluntarily (without anyone asking)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of accord means:
mind
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useBook 2
Web Links
unquizzed meaning  —4 uses
aggrieve
3 uses
Be not then aggrieved that I should do so.†
aggrieved = felt harmed by unfair treatment
DefinitionGenerally aggrieve means:
feeling harmed by unfair treatment; or (more rarely) harming someone unfairly
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useBook 3
Web Links
appease
8 uses
Even now, however, be appeased, and put away your anger from you.†
appeased = satisfied or pacified (made less angry or upset)
DefinitionGenerally appease means:
satisfy or pacify (make less angry or upset) — typically by giving something wanted
Word Statistics
Book8 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useBook 9
Web Links
askance
3 uses
Better so, than live to be disgraced and looked askance at.†
askance = with disapproval or distrust; or directed to one side
DefinitionGenerally askance means:
with disapproval, distrust, or suspicion

or:

directed to one side — especially a sideways glance
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useBook 3
Web Links
beguile
7 uses
I have sent him into a sweet slumber, and Juno has beguiled him into going to bed with her.†
beguiled = deceived through charm or enchantment
DefinitionGenerally beguile means:
to charm, enchant, or entertain someone; or to deceive — especially through charm
Word Statistics
Book7 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useBook 5
Web Links
chattel
2 uses
There were many to whom the Epeans owed chattels, for we men of Pylus were few and had been oppressed with wrong; in former years Hercules had come, and had laid his hand heavy upon us, so that all our best men had perished.†
chattels = things that are tangible and owned
DefinitionGenerally chattel means:
owned property (in law, tangible property other than real estate)
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useBook 11
Web Links
compunction
1 use
Then Sleep answered, "Juno, great queen of goddesses, daughter of mighty Saturn, I would lull any other of the gods to sleep without compunction, not even excepting the waters of Oceanus from whom all of them proceed, but I dare not go near Jove, nor send him to sleep unless he bids me.†
compunction = guilt for a misdeed; or a feeling that it would be wrong to do something
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useBook 14
Web Links
desist
1 use
Now, therefore, let us all do as I say; let us bring down the ships that are on the beach and draw them into the water; let us make them fast to their mooring-stones a little way out, against the fall of night—if even by night the Trojans will desist from fighting; we may then draw down the rest of the fleet.†
desist = to not do something
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useBook 14
Web Links
disinclined
1 use
But he angrily rebuked those whom he saw shirking and disinclined to fight.†
disinclined = feeling reluctant to do something
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useBook 4
Web Links
effrontery
1 use
Tell him all as I now bid you, and tell him in public that the Achaeans may hate him and beware of him should he think that he can yet dupe others for his effrontery never fails him.†
effrontery = rude and disrespectful behavior
DefinitionGenerally effrontery means:
rude and disrespectful behavior — often made by someone who does not realize they are being rude — as when someone is presumptuous or impolitely bold
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useBook 9
Web Links
eschew
1 use
Eschew vain quarrelling, and the Achaeans old and young will respect you more for doing so.'†
eschew = avoid and stay away from deliberately
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useBook 9
Web Links
expound
1 use
I will expound to the son of Peleus, and do you other Achaeans heed me and mark me well.†
expound = explain or discuss in detail
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useBook 19
Web Links
foreshadow
1 use
And Hector spoke thus:— "Hear me, Trojans and Achaeans, that I may speak even as I am minded; Jove on his high throne has brought our oaths and covenants to nothing, and foreshadows ill for both of us, till you either take the towers of Troy, or are yourselves vanquished at your ships.†
foreshadows = is a sign of
DefinitionGenerally foreshadow means:
to be a sign of future events
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useBook 7
Web Links
gambol
1 use
As he went his way over the waves the sea-monsters left their lairs, for they knew their lord, and came gambolling round him from every quarter of the deep, while the sea in her gladness opened a path before his chariot.†
gambolling = frolicking (skipping, leaping, and/or running around in a happy, playful manner)

(editor's note:  This is a British spelling. Americans use gamboling.)
DefinitionGenerally gambol means:
to frolic (skip, leap, and/or run around in a happy, playful manner)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useBook 13
Web Links
garnish
1 use
I shall not go; I can garnish his bed no longer; I should be a by-word among all the women of Troy.†
garnish = to decorate or adorn something; or the item added for decoration
DefinitionGenerally this sense of garnish means:
to decorate or adorn something (most typically food with another food); or the item added for decoration
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useBook 3
Web Links
ineffable
1 use
As when the stars shine clear, and the moon is bright—there is not a breath of air, not a peak nor glade nor jutting headland but it stands out in the ineffable radiance that breaks from the serene of heaven; the stars can all of them be told and the heart of the shepherd is glad—even thus shone the watchfires of the Trojans before Ilius midway between the ships and the river Xanthus.†
ineffable = something that cannot be put into words
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useBook 8
Web Links
iniquity
1 use
"If," said Agamemnon, "you are sons of Antimachus, who once at a council of Trojans proposed that Menelaus and Ulysses, who had come to you as envoys, should be killed and not suffered to return, you shall now pay for the foul iniquity of your father."†
iniquity = immorality; or an immoral act
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useBook 11
Web Links
preeminent
1 use
Because heaven has so richly endowed you with the arts of war, you think that you must therefore excel others in counsel; but you cannot thus claim preeminence in all things.†
preeminence = the quality of surpassing others in status, ability, or possession of a notable characteristic
DefinitionGenerally preeminent means:
outstanding or surpassing others in status, ability, or possession of a notable characteristic
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useBook 13
Web Links
remiss
6 uses
But you are careless and wilfully remiss.†
remiss = careless — especially with regard to a duty
Word Statistics
Book6 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useBook 6
Web Links
satiate
3 uses
All things pall after a while—sleep, love, sweet song, and stately dance— still these are things of which a man would surely have his fill rather than of battle, whereas it is of battle that the Trojans are insatiate.†
insatiate = not possible to satisfy

(Editor's note:  The prefix "in-" in insatiate means not and reverses the meaning of satiate. This is the same pattern you see in words like invisible, incomplete, and insecure.)
DefinitionGenerally satiate means:
to satisfy a hunger; or fill to satisfaction (typically said of hunger for food, but can be said of anything desired—such as of knowledge or sensual pleasure)
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useBook 6
Web Links
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Sample usage followed by this mark was not checked by an editor. Please let us know if you spot a problem.
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