toggle menu
menu
vocabulary
1000+ books
Book Menu

Murder On The Orient Express

Extra Credit Words with Typical Sample Sentences

instructions
abominable
3 uses
She described the abominable treatment of prisoners.
abominable = exceptionally bad
DefinitionGenerally abominable means:
exceptionally bad or detestable
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.11
Web Links
acute   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 2 uses
1  —1 use as in:
acute pain
She felt an acute pain in her neck.
acute = sharp (severe or very bad)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of acute means:
sharp (severe or strong) — usually negative
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3.9
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
acute sense of smell
Dogs have an acute sense of smell.
acute = excellent (highly perceptive)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of acute means:
sharp (highly perceptive in some area or mentally sharp)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.10
Web Links
benevolent
2 uses
They called themselves The Benevolent Association because their mission was to help others.
benevolent = kind, generous, or charitable
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 1.3
Web Links
consequence
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
of little consequence
Think carefully. This is a consequential decision.
consequential = important
DefinitionGenerally this sense of consequence means:
importance or relevance
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 3.6
Web Links
correspond
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
corresponding by email
We correspond regularly via email.
correspond = write to each other
DefinitionGenerally this sense of correspond means:
communicate by writing letters or email
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.6
Web Links
didactic
1 use
Though John loved her lessons, George hated her didactic tone.
didactic = describing someone as inclined too inclined to instruct
DefinitionGenerally didactic means:
describing something intended to instruct; or someone excessively inclined to instruct
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3.2
Web Links
dubious
1 use
She was dubious, but agreed to come with us anyway.
dubious = doubtful; or suspicious; or full of uncertainty
DefinitionGenerally dubious means:
doubtful
in various senses, including:
  • doubtful that something should be relied upon — as in "The argument relies on a dubious assumption."
  • doubtful that something is morally proper — as in "The company is accused of using dubious sales practices to influence minors."
  • bad or of questionable value — as in "The state has the dubious distinction of the highest taxes."
  • doubtful or uncertain — as in "She is dubious about making the change."
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 3.2
Web Links
duplicity
1 use
I trust her. Duplicity isn't in her nature or her tool kit.
duplicity = deception
DefinitionGenerally duplicity means:
deception (lying to or misleading others) — usually over an extended period
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3.5
Web Links
egress
1 use
Picketing strikers may not block access to or egress from the premises.
egress = exit
DefinitionGenerally egress means:
to exit
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3.9
Web Links
impetuous
1 use
She regretted her impetuous promise.
impetuous = impulsive (made suddenly without much thought)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of impetuous means:
impulsive (acting suddenly without much thought) — often with an unfortunate consequence
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.15
Web Links
incisive
1 use
As usual, Mary's comments were incisive.
incisive = direct, clear, and sharp in thinking or expression
DefinitionGenerally incisive means:
direct, clear, and sharp in thinking or expression — often indicating a decisive person (makes decisions quickly) or a penetrating mind
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3.4
Web Links
indolent
1 use
She never recovered from the indolence of her youth.
indolence = laziness
DefinitionGenerally this sense of indolent means:
lazy; disinclined to work
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.3
Web Links
placid
3 uses
The sky is clear and the lake placid.
placid = calm
DefinitionGenerally placid means:
calm and not easily excited
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.12
Web Links
redolent
1 use
The film is redolent of the early Harry Potter movies.
redolent = reminiscent (serving to bring to mind)
DefinitionGenerally redolent means:
reminiscent (serving to bring to mind)

or:

or smelling like something; or having a sweet fragrance
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.8
Web Links
resignation   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 2 uses
1  —1 use as in:
submitted her resignation
I know you're unhappy there, but don't submit your resignation until you find a better job.
resignation = a document expressing that someone is quitting a job
DefinitionGenerally this sense of resignation means:
to quit — especially a job or position; or a document expressing such an act
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library12 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 1.1
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
accepted it with resignation
It wasn't her first choice, but she accepted it with resignation.
resignation = (accepted) something undesired as unavoidable or the lesser of evils
DefinitionGenerally this sense of resignation means:
acceptance of something undesired as unavoidable or the lesser of evils
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 3.8
Web Links
simile
1 use
When she said he was "as subtle as a sledgehammer," she was using ironic simile.
simile = a phrase that highlights similarity between things of different kinds
DefinitionGenerally simile means:
a phrase that highlights similarity between things of different kinds — usually formed with "like" or "as"

as in "It's like looking for a needle in a haystack," or "She is as quiet as a mouse."
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.6
Web Links
stolid
1 use
She listened to both arguments thoughtfully, but with a face as stolid as a cow's.
stolid = emotionless
DefinitionGenerally stolid means:
having or revealing little emotion — sometimes indicating qualities of not changing or being dependable

or (much more rarely):

of an object:  not interesting — often large and unmoving
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.15
Web Links
susceptible
1 use
I am more susceptible to colds than most.
susceptible = easily influenced or harmed
DefinitionGenerally susceptible means:
easily influenced or harmed

or:

capable of being treated in a particular way
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 1.1
Web Links
Go to Book Menu
Take Pre-Reading Quiz
SAT® is a registered trademark of the College Board, which is not affiliated with verbalworkout.com™, and does not endorse this site.