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Murder On The Orient Express
Vocabulary

Extra Credit Words with Typical Sample Sentences

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acquiesce
1 use
She is opposed, but will ultimately acquiesce to the will of the majority.
acquiesce = reluctantly comply
DefinitionGenerally acquiesce means:
reluctant or unenthusiastic compliance, consent, or agreement
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.15
Web Links
acute   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 2 uses
1  —1 use as in:
acute pain
She felt an acute pain in her neck.
acute = sharp (a severely negative event) — often with a rapid onset
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3.9
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
acute vision
Beavers have an acute sense of smell.
acute = sharp (highly perceptive or intelligent)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of acute means:
sharp (highly perceptive in some area or mentally sharp)

(often with a connotation that resulting awareness is painful)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.10
Web Links
benevolent
2 uses
They called themselves The Benevolent Association because their mission was to help others.
benevolent = kind, generous, or charitable
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.3
Web Links
capricious
1 use
Nothing seems more capricious than a tornado.
capricious = impulsive or unpredictable
DefinitionGenerally capricious means:
impulsive or unpredictable or tending to make sudden changes — especially impulsive behavior
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.3
Web Links
consequence
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
of little consequence
Think carefully. This is a consequential decision.
consequential = important
DefinitionGenerally this sense of consequence means:
importance or relevance
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 3.6
Web Links
correspond
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
corresponding by email
We correspond regularly via email.
correspond = write to each other
DefinitionGenerally this sense of correspond means:
communicate by writing letters or email
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.6
Web Links
decorum
1 use
All decorum was lost in the classroom.
decorum = manners and conduct considered to be proper and in good taste
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3.9
Web Links
deference
2 uses
They changed their strategy in deference to the President's wishes.
deference = respect
DefinitionGenerally deference means:
polite respect — often when submitting to another's wishes
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 1.5
Web Links
didactic
1 use
Though John loved her lessons, George hated her didactic tone.
didactic = describing someone as inclined too inclined to instruct
DefinitionGenerally didactic means:
describing something intended to instruct; or someone excessively inclined to instruct
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3.2
Web Links
dubious
1 use
She was dubious, but agreed to come with us anyway.
dubious = doubtful; or suspicious; or full of uncertainty
DefinitionGenerally dubious means:
doubtful — such as:
  • uncertain that something can be relied upon
  • uncertain about the quality or wisdom of something
  • a relatively gentle way of saying that the quality of something described as good is in such doubt that it is considered bad
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 3.2
Web Links
furtive
2 uses
She watched me in a furtive manner—trying to hide her interest.
furtive = cautious or taking pains to avoid being observed
DefinitionGenerally furtive means:
taking pains to avoid being observed

or:

in a manner indicating nervousness (being cautious or appearing suspicious)
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.8
Web Links
gesticulate
1 use
The moderator turned her microphone off, leaving us to see her gesticulations, but not hear her words.
gesticulations = gestures (hand or body movements) made while speaking or to express something
DefinitionGenerally gesticulate means:
to make gestures (hand or body movements) while speaking or to express something
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.3
Web Links
incisive
1 use
As usual, Mary's comments were incisive.
incisive = direct, clear, and sharp in thinking or expression
DefinitionGenerally incisive means:
direct, clear, and sharp in thinking or expression — often indicating a decisive person (makes decisions quickly) or a penetrating mind
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3.4
Web Links
irony
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
verbal irony
She was being ironic when she said she couldn't wait to see you again.
ironic = saying one thing, while meaning the opposite or something else — usually as humor or sarcasm
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.13
Web Links
munificent
1 use
She was in a munificent mood and contributed a million dollars to the cause.
munificent = very generous — especially with money
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.2
Web Links
negligent
2 uses
Please forgive my negligence in not calling you sooner.
negligence = insufficient care or attention
DefinitionGenerally negligent means:
insufficient care or attention (not being careful enough or not trying hard enough to fulfill a responsibility)
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 2.1
Web Links
philanthropy
1 use
Her primary interests are family and philanthropy.
philanthropy = helping others
DefinitionGenerally philanthropy means:
helping others — especially donating money to worthy causes; or an organization that does so
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.2
Web Links
redolent
1 use
The film is redolent of the early Harry Potter movies.
redolent = reminiscent (serving to bring to mind)
DefinitionGenerally redolent means:
reminiscent (serving to bring to mind)

or:

or smelling like something; or having a sweet fragrance
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.8
Web Links
spurious
1 use
Don't be fooled by such spurious arguments.
spurious = false; or not genuine — often seeming plausible, or intentionally deceptive
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.13
Web Links
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