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A Room of One's Own

Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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Age of Reason
1 use
And when the age of faith was over and the age of reason had come, still the same flow of gold and silver went on; fellowships were founded; lectureships endowed; only the gold and silver flowed now, not from the coffers of the king.†
Age of Reason = a movement in the 17th century that advocated the use of reason in the reappraisal of accepted ideas and social institutions — especially in Britain, France, & Germany
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
amorous
1 use
It is she—shady and amorous as she was—who makes it not quite fantastic for me to say to you to-night: Earn five hundred a year by your wits.†
amorous = romantic or sexual
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
anodyne
1 use
So, with a sigh, because novels so often provide an anodyne and not an antidote, glide one into torpid slumbers instead of rousing one with a burning brand, I settled down with a notebook and a pencil to make what I could of Mary Carmichael's first novel, LIFE'S ADVENTURE.†
anodyne = something soothing, comforting or mild so as not to upset
DefinitionGenerally anodyne means:
a medicine used to relieve pain

or:

something soothing, comforting or mild so as not to upset
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 5
Web Links
assiduous
1 use
The student by my side, for instance, who was copying assiduously from a scientific manual, was, I felt sure, extracting pure nuggets of the essential ore every ten minutes or so.
assiduously = marked by care and persistent effort
DefinitionGenerally assiduous means:
diligent (showing care and persistent effort)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
brevity
1 use
And if I could not grasp the truth about W. (as for brevity's sake I had come to call her) in the past, why bother about W. in the future?†
brevity = the use of just a few words; or lasting a short time
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
conciliatory
1 use
she was saying this by way of aggression, or that by way of conciliation.
conciliation = action intended to end bad feelings or build trust

(editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
DefinitionGenerally conciliatory means:
intended to end bad feelings or build trust
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
fastidious
1 use
She had broken up Jane Austen's sentence, and thus given me no chance of pluming myself upon my impeccable taste, my fastidious ear.
fastidious = tasteful and detail-noticing

(editor's note:  pluming is a way of saying that she would feel self-satisfied)
DefinitionGenerally fastidious means:
giving careful attention to detail

or:

excessively concerned with cleanliness or matters of taste
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 5
Web Links
indifferent
6 uses
The indifference of the world which Keats and Flaubert and other men of genius have found so hard to bear was...
indifference = lack of interest
DefinitionGenerally indifferent means:
without interest
in various senses, including:
  • unconcerned — as in "She is indifferent to what is served to eat."
  • unsympathetic — as in "She is indifferent to his needs."
  • not of good quality (which may imply average or poor quality depending upon context) — as in "an indifferent performance"
  • impartial — as in "We need a judge who is indifferent."
Word Statistics
Book6 uses
Library15 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
inevitable
5 uses
And the novels, without meaning to, inevitably lie.
inevitably = with certainty that it will happen
DefinitionGenerally inevitable means:
certain to happen (even if one tried to prevent it)
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library23 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
innate
1 use
By feeling that one has some innate superiority—it may be wealth, or rank, a straight nose, or...
innate = present at birth or existing as a quality inseparable (in this case, from oneself)
DefinitionGenerally innate means:
of a quality:  present at birth; or arising from within rather than having been learned or acquired
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
minute
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
minute size
Otherwise you would not be here tonight, and your chance of earning five hundred pounds a year, precarious as I am afraid that it still is, would be minute in the extreme.†
minute = small
DefinitionGenerally this sense of minute means:
small, exceptionally small, or insignificant
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 6
Web Links
notorious
2 uses
Further, accentuating all these difficulties and making them harder to bear is the world's notorious indifference.
notorious = well known for something bad
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library9 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 6
Web Links
passage
1 use
Does it explain my astonishment of the other day when Z, most humane, most modest of men, taking up some book by Rebecca West and reading a passage in it, exclaimed, 'The arrant feminist!'†
passage = a short part of a longer written work
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
persistent
1 use
They alone were deaf to that persistent voice ... admonishing them, if they would be good and win, as I suppose, some shiny prize, to keep within certain limits which the gentleman in question thinks suitable—
persistent = continuing despite opposition
DefinitionGenerally persistent means:
continuing — especially despite difficulties or opposition
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
pious
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
cling to the pious hope
We may all join in that pious hope, but it is doubtful whether...
pious = sincere, but highly unlikely
DefinitionGenerally this sense of pious means:
(describing a hope or wish as) sincere, but highly unlikely
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 6
Web Links
prosaic
3 uses
I find myself saying briefly and prosaically that it is much more important to be oneself than anything else.
prosaically = lacking anything unusual
DefinitionGenerally prosaic means:
lacking anything unusual, interesting, or challenging
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3
Web Links
revere
1 use
and, shutting the book even with a kind of reverence as if it were something very precious,
reverence = feelings of deep respect and admiration
DefinitionGenerally revere means:
regard with feelings of deep respect and admiration — sometimes with a mixture of wonder and awe or fear
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library11 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
scrupulous
1 use
It does not care whether Flaubert finds the right word or whether Carlyle scrupulously verifies this or that fact.
scrupulously = diligently
DefinitionGenerally scrupulous means:
careful to behave ethically and/or diligently (with great care and attention to detail)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 3
Web Links
Shakespeare
51 uses
If ever a mind was incandescent, unimpeded, I thought, turning again to the bookcase, it was Shakespeare's mind.
Shakespeare = English poet and dramatist frequently cited as the greatest writer in the English language (1564-1616)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of Shakespeare means:
English dramatist and poet frequently cited as the greatest writer in the English language and who wrote such works as Romeo and Juliet and Hamlet (1564-1616)
Word Statistics
Book51 uses
Library11 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
stagnate
2 uses
but women ... suffer from too rigid a restraint, too absolute a stagnation, precisely as men would suffer; and it is narrow-minded in their more privileged fellow-creatures to say that they ought to confine themselves to making puddings and knitting stockings, to playing on the piano and embroidering bags.
stagnation = lack of development or movement

(editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
DefinitionGenerally stagnate means:
staying still or not developing
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
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