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I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings

Top-Ranked Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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accommodate
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
hotel accommodations
Mother stayed in Los Angeles long enough to get us settled, then she returned to San Francisco to arrange living accommodations for her abruptly enlarged family.
accommodations = space or lodging
From page 202.6  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of accommodations means:
space or lodgings — such as a hotel room or office space
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 26, p.202.6
Web Links
accord   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 7 uses
1  —6 uses as in:
according to, or in accord with
But it was a shared if seldom voiced knowledge that all movements fitted, and worked according to a larger plan.
according to = in keeping with
From page 137.4  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of accord means:
in keeping with; or in agreement/harmony/unity with
This sense of accord is often seen in the form according to or accordingly where it can take on more specific meanings. For example:
  • "According to Kim, ..." — as stated by
  • "To each according to her ability." — based upon
  • "Points are scored according to how well they perform." — depending upon
  • "The dose is calculated according to body weight." — in proportion to
  • "We got a flat tire. Accordingly, I pulled to the side of the road." — because of what was just said; or as a result
Word Statistics
Book6 uses
Library53 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 6, p.41.4
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
done of her own accord
It was always possible that the teeth would quiet down and maybe drop out of their own accord.
own accord = own mind (i.e., on their own)
From page 188  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of accord means:
mind
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 24, p.188
Web Links
approach   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 4 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
approached the city
Through the cloth film, I saw the shadow approach.†
approach = coming near
From page 97.1  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of approach means:
to get closer to (near in space, time, quantity, or quality)
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library104 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 6, p.43.1
Web Links
2  —2 uses as in:
use the best approach
He continued speaking directly to the dead woman, and I half wished she would rise up and answer him, offended by the coarseness of his approach.†
approach = technique (way of doing something)
From page 161.6  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of approach means:
a way of doing something; or a route that leads to a particular place
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 22, p.161.6
Web Links
attribute
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
I attribute it to...
I find it interesting that the meanest life, the poorest existence, is attributed to God's will, but as human beings become more affluent, as their living standard and style begin to ascend the material scale, God descends the scale of responsibility at a commensurate speed.
attributed = credited (pointed to as the cause of something)
From page 120.9  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of attribute means:
to credit (a source for something)
in two typical senses:
  • "I attribute it to her work." — to say who or what made something happen
  • "Remember to attribute any quotations in your paper." — indicate the source of a quotation or idea
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 18, p.120.9
Web Links
contempt
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
feels contempt towards her
He must have tired of being crippled ... and the looks he suffered of either contempt or pity had simply worn him out,
contempt = disrespect and disgust
From page 13.8  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of contempt means:
lack of respect for someone or something thought inferior — often accompanied by a feeling of dislike or disgust
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2, p.13.8
Web Links
contend
6 uses
1  —6 uses as in:
She contended for the gold medal
Another right to the body, it looks like it was low ... Yes, ladies and gentlemen, the referee is signaling but the contender keeps raining the blows on Louis.
contender = competitor
From page 134.9  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of contend means:
to compete
Word Statistics
Book6 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 19, p.133.9
Web Links
convey   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 3 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
convey her thoughts
Just the gentle pressure of her rough hand conveyed her own concern and assurance to me.†
conveyed = communicated or expressed
From page 115.4  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of convey means:
communicate or express
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library9 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 17, p.115.4
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
convey her safely to
Her awareness of life's perils convinced her that while I would be safe on the public conveyances, she "wasn't about to trust a taxi driver with her baby."†
conveyances = means of transport
From page 270.6  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of convey means:
transport
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 34, p.270.6
Web Links
correspond   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 2 uses
1  —1 use as in:
corresponding by email
Daddy Bailey had a girl friend, who had begun corresponding with me some months before, and she was to meet me at the train.†
corresponding = exchanging letters or messages
From page 226.5  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of correspond means:
communicate by writing letters or email
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 30, p.226.5
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
a correspondence course
Bailey was obviously always going to be too small to be an athlete, so which concrete angel glued to what country seat had decided that if my brother wanted to become a lawyer he had to first pay penance for his skin by picking cotton and hoeing corn and studying correspondence books at night for twenty years?†
correspondence = done from afar (by mailing letters, reports, etc.)
From page 179.9  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of correspondence means:
done from afar
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 23, p.179.9
Web Links
descend
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
thieves descended upon us
Then quiet descended.
descended = arrived
From page 126.4  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of descend means:
to come or arrive — especially suddenly or from above or as an attack
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 18, p.126.4
Web Links
impudent
7 uses
When I refused to be the child they knew and accepted me to be, I was called impudent...
impudent = improperly bold or disrespectful towards elders
From page 88.3  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally impudent means:
improperly bold or disrespectful — especially toward someone who is older or considered to be of higher status
Word Statistics
Book7 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 31, p.245.2
Web Links
indulge
7 uses
she spent no time in indulging the frivolous.
indulging = enjoying (to excess)
From page 216.6  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally indulge means:
to give into a desire or enjoy something — especially in excess of what is thought good—such as a desire to eat too much cake, or be too lazy

or:

to allow or help someone to get their way or enjoy something — especially something that (probably because of excess) is not considered to be good or proper
Word Statistics
Book7 uses
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 28, p.216.6
Web Links
negative
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
had a negative effect
High spots in Stamps were usually negative: droughts, floods, lynchings and deaths.†
negative = bad
From page 91.2  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of negative means:
bad or harmful
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 14, p.91.2
Web Links
pacify
3 uses
She refused to be pacified, but I had shown myself in a favorable and Christian light.
pacified = calmed
From page 245.4  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally pacify means:
calm someone who is angry; or establish peace
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 15, p.102.1
Web Links
refute
1 use
On the surface it appeared to be totally peaceful and almost a refutation of the term "revolution."
refutation = evidence that something is false

(editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
From page 209.2  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally refute means:
to disprove or argue against
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 27, p.209.2
Web Links
soliloquy
3 uses
I had chosen drama simply because I liked Hamlet's soliloquy beginning, "To be, or not to be."
soliloquy = a speech you make to yourself or as a long uninterrupted part of a conversation
From page 217.3  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 23, p.182.7
Web Links
yield
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
will yield valuable data
One leg had yielded itself to the loose dirt.†
yielded = given

(editor's note:  By yielded itself to , she is saying that one leg of the alter table had fallen into the loose dirt.)
From page 123.6  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of yield means:
to produce (usually something wanted); or the thing or amount produced
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 18, p.123.6
Web Links
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