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The Hunchback of Notre Dame
Vocabulary

Top-Ranked Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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assiduous
1 use
On the other hand, he was assiduous at the great and the small schools of the Rue Saint Jean de Beauvais. The first pupil whom the Abbé de Saint Pierre de Val, at the moment of beginning his reading on canon law, always perceived, glued to a pillar of the school Saint-Vendregesile, opposite his rostrum, was Claude Frollo, armed with his horn ink-bottle, biting his pen, scribbling on his threadbare knee, and, in winter, blowing on his fingers.
assiduous = diligent (showing care and persistent effort)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.4.2
Web Links
audacious
11 uses
a very audaciously attired young girl
audaciously = boldly and daringly
DefinitionGenerally audacious means:
bold and daring (inclined to take risks) — especially in violating social convention in a manner that could offend others
Word Statistics
Book11 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.3.1
Web Links
austere
7 uses
This brown-skinned, broad-shouldered priest, hitherto condemned to the austere virginity of the cloister, was quivering and boiling in the presence of this night scene of love and voluptuousness.
austere = self-denying
DefinitionGenerally austere means:
a notable absence of luxury, comfort, or decoration

or:

of a person:  stern in manner; or practicing great self-denial
Word Statistics
Book7 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 1.4.2
Web Links
bourgeois
48 uses
the house, which is simple and thoroughly bourgeois
bourgeois = typical of the middle class
DefinitionGenerally bourgeois means:
typical of the middle class or their values and habits - typically used disapprovingly

or (in Marxist theory):

typical of the property-owning class
Word Statistics
Book48 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.2.6
Web Links
capricious
12 uses
the capricious regulations regarding the public highways
capricious = unpredictable
DefinitionGenerally capricious means:
impulsive or unpredictable or tending to make sudden changes — especially impulsive behavior
Word Statistics
Book12 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.9.5
Web Links
credulous
1 use
What more was needed, simple and credulous as she was?
credulous = gullible (being too willing to believe)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 2.9.4
Web Links
deride
8 uses
All this only increased the derision and hooting.
derision = disrespect — typically while laughing at or making fun of
DefinitionGenerally deride means:
laugh at or make fun of—while showing a lack of respect
Word Statistics
Book8 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.1.1
Web Links
disdain
17 uses
Down to that day, he had known only humiliation, disdain for his condition, disgust for his person.
disdain = a lack of respect
DefinitionGenerally disdain means:
a lack of respect — often suggesting distaste and an undeserved sense of superiority

or:

to reject as not good enough
Word Statistics
Book17 uses
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 2.7.6
Web Links
edifice
98 uses
That edifice is colossal.
edifice = building
DefinitionGenerally edifice means:
a building — especially a large one

or:

a conceptual or organizational framework
Word Statistics
Book98 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.2.2
Web Links
incessant
29 uses
It was this fixed idea which returned incessantly, which tortured him, which ate into his brain,
incessantly = continuously
DefinitionGenerally incessant means:
continuous — often in an annoying way
Word Statistics
Book29 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.1.1
Web Links
insipid
2 uses
Queue-en-Brie was a very insipid place to stay at then, a village of farriers, and cow-girls with chapped hands, a long line of poor dwellings and thatched cottages,...
insipid = dull (uninteresting and unimpactful)
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.7.8
Web Links
Monsieur
152 uses
I see that you agree with Monsieur de Boucicaut.
Monsieur = Mr. (in French)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of Monsieur means:
French equivalent to:  "Mr." in English

or:

French equivalent to: "sir" in English (a polite way to address a male)
Word Statistics
Book152 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.1.1
Web Links
perceive   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 2 uses
1  —1 use as in:
perceive the system as unfair
"But," resumed the good Oudarde, "you must have perceived to some extent, that yesterday was a festival."
perceived = seen in a certain way so as to form a belief or opinion
DefinitionGenerally this sense of perceive means:
to view in a certain way so as to form a belief or opinion
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 1.6.3
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
though blind, can perceive light
As he plunged into the side aisles, he perceived a reddish light behind a cluster of pillars.
perceived = saw
DefinitionGenerally this sense of perceive means:
to become aware of — especially by using the senses (to see, hear, smell, feel, or taste)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 2.9.1
Web Links
pious
13 uses
The solemn lines of that architecture, ... the serene and pious thoughts which emanated, so to speak, from all the pores of that stone, acted upon her without her being aware of it.
pious = holy (religiously moral)
DefinitionGenerally pious means:
behaving in a highly moral or religious manner

or less commonly:  behaving highly moral in a self-righteous or holier-than-thou manner
Word Statistics
Book13 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.2.6
Web Links
profound   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 2 uses
1  —1 use as in:
profound idea
He added with the air of a profound thinker, "One is indebted sometimes to fortune, sometimes to ruse, for the happy issue of great enterprises."
profound = deep or far-reaching in intellect or insight
DefinitionGenerally this sense of profound means:
deep or far-reaching in intellect or consequence
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library9 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.11.1
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
profound sadness
She listened to him with profound tenderness.
profound = of greatest intensity or emotional depth
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library9 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.9.3
Web Links
prosaic
2 uses
The spectacle which presented itself to his eyes, when his ragged escort finally deposited him at the end of his trip, was not fitted to bear him back to poetry, even to the poetry of hell. It was more than ever the prosaic and brutal reality of the tavern.
prosaic = lacking anything unusual
DefinitionGenerally prosaic means:
lacking anything unusual, interesting, or challenging
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.2.6
Web Links
recluse
52 uses
The young girl had recognized the spiteful recluse.
recluse = a person who has withdrawn from society (avoids contact with others)
DefinitionGenerally recluse means:
someone withdrawn from society (living alone and avoiding contact)
Word Statistics
Book52 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.6.2
Web Links
sagacious
4 uses
All at once his deep-set eye assumed so sagacious and penetrating an expression, that Gringoire felt himself, so to speak, searched to the bottom of the soul by that glance.
sagacious = wise
DefinitionGenerally sagacious means:
wise — especially through long experience and thoughtfulness
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.7.2
Web Links
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