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The Hunchback of Notre Dame

Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

instructions
abdicate
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
abdicated the throne
There was in this voluntary abdication of his freewill, in this fancy submitting itself to another fancy, which suspects it not, a mixture of fantastic independence and blind obedience, something indescribable, intermediate between slavery and liberty, which pleased Gringoire,—a spirit essentially compound, undecided, and complex, holding the extremities of all extremes, incessantly suspended between all human propensities, and neutralizing one by the other.
abdication = giving up power

(editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of abdicate means:
to formally give up power — as when giving up a position of royalty such as to resign from being king
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.2.4
Web Links
apathy
1 use
A few apathetic faces of judges alone could be dimly discerned.
apathetic = without interest or enthusiasm
DefinitionGenerally apathy means:
lack of interest and enthusiasm
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.8.3
Web Links
augment
3 uses
He was minded to augment his pace, but for the third time something barred his way.
augment = increase
DefinitionGenerally augment means:
enlarge or increase
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.1.3
Web Links
bronze
5 uses
1  —5 uses as in:
bronze won't corrode in salt water
After leaving behind him the civic Tournelle and the criminal tower, and skirted the great walls of the king's garden, on that unpaved strand where the mud reached to his ankles, he reached the western point of the city, and considered for some time the islet of the Passeur-aux-Vaches, which has disappeared beneath the bronze horse of the Pont Neuf.
bronze = made of a brownish metal
DefinitionGenerally this sense of bronze means:
a brownish-colored metal with red or yellow hues that is made of copper and (usually) tin
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.2.1
Web Links
candid
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
your candid opinion
Gringoire, in the candid sanctuary of his own conscience, admired its clearness.
candid = honest
DefinitionGenerally this sense of candid means:
honest and direct
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 1.1.2
Web Links
complacent
1 use
then rose and said, without exhibiting too much self-complacency at his success,—"The accused has confessed all."
complacency = satisfaction
DefinitionGenerally complacent means:
contented (unworried and satisfied) — often to a fault
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 2.8.3
Web Links
conciliatory
1 use
it was not his soul which was in question, but his life (since he lacked that precious conciliator, which places itself so effectually between the bandit and the honest man—a purse).
conciliator = something that ends bad feelings
DefinitionGenerally conciliatory means:
intended to end bad feelings or build trust
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.2.6
Web Links
contrite
2 uses
Alas! my very dear brother, I should like to settle down to a better life. I come to you full of contrition, I am penitent. I make my confession.
contrition = sorrow or regret for a fault or offense

(editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
DefinitionGenerally contrite means:
feeling sorrow or regret for a fault or offense
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.10.2
Web Links
depravity
2 uses
impure, and depraved pleasure
depraved = immoral or evil
DefinitionGenerally depravity means:
complete immorality or evilness
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.9.1
Web Links
deride
8 uses
All this only increased the derision and hooting.
derision = critical disrespect — typically while laughing at or making fun of

(editor's note:  The suffix "-sion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in admission from admit, discussion from discuss, and invasion from invade.)
DefinitionGenerally deride means:
to criticize with strong disrespect — often
with humor
Word Statistics
Book8 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.1.1
Web Links
edict
2 uses
Where is the staircase, from which Charles VI promulgated his edict of pardon?
edict = order
DefinitionGenerally edict means:
an order — typically a formal proclamation or a legally binding court decree
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.1.1
Web Links
efface
3 uses
1  —3 uses as in:
efface the memory
All the hideous phantoms, Pierrat Torterue, Jacques Charmolue, were effaced from her mind, all, even the priest.†
effaced = removed completely from recognition or memory
DefinitionGenerally this sense of efface means:
remove completely from recognition or memory — sometimes by erasing
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePref.
Web Links
enigma
2 uses
seek what could have been the thought concealed beneath those enigmatic words
enigmatic = mysterious and seemingly unexplainable
DefinitionGenerally enigma means:
something mysterious that seems unexplainable
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.4.5
Web Links
envoy
4 uses
...the usher announced, in a sonorous voice, "Messieurs the Envoys of Monsieur the Duke of Austria."
envoys = representatives sent on a mission
DefinitionGenerally envoy means:
a representative sent on a mission — often representing a government
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.1.1
Web Links
expedient
3 uses
I have imagination; I will devise expedients for you.
expedients = actions that are speedy or practical
DefinitionGenerally expedient means:
a practical action — especially one that accepts negative tradeoffs due to circumstances

or:

convenient, speedy, or practical
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.10.1
Web Links
heresy
4 uses
not a week passed which had not its counterfeiter to boil, or its witch to hang, or its heretic to burn,
heretic = someone with opinions or actions most people consider immoral
DefinitionGenerally heresy means:
opinions or actions most people consider immoral
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.5.2
Web Links
olfactory
1 use
As he passed the Rue de la Huchette, the odor of those admirable spits, which were incessantly turning, tickled his olfactory apparatus, and he bestowed a loving glance toward the Cyclopean roast, which one day drew from the Franciscan friar, Calatagirone, this pathetic exclamation: ~Veramente, queste rotisserie sono cosa stupenda~!
olfactory = smelling
DefinitionGenerally olfactory means:
relating to the sense of smell
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.7.4
Web Links
prone
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
prone position
Nevertheless, he caught sight of the archdeacon prone upon the earth in the mud.†
prone = lying face downward
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.9.1
Web Links
provincial
1 use
I am but a poor provincial gentleman, who removeth his shoes before entering the dwellings of the learned.
provincial = unsophisticated (from the provinces rather than the capital city)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of provincial means:
unsophisticated (meant disapprovingly to refer to old-fashioned or narrow-minded attitudes and ideas)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.5.1
Web Links
simile
1 use
It is useless to warn the reader not to take literally all the similes which we are obliged to employ here to express the singular, symmetrical, direct, almost consubstantial union of a man and an edifice.
similes = expressions that highlight similarity between things of different kinds
DefinitionGenerally simile means:
a phrase that highlights similarity between things of different kinds — usually formed with "like" or "as"

as in "It's like looking for a needle in a haystack," or "She is as quiet as a mouse."
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.4.3
Web Links
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Sample usage followed by this mark was not checked by an editor. Please let us know if you spot a problem.
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