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The Hunchback of Notre Dame

Extra Credit Words with Typical Sample Sentences

instructions
abdicate
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
abdicated the throne
Prince Edward abdicated the British throne to marry the American.
abdicated = formally gave up power
DefinitionGenerally this sense of abdicate means:
to formally give up power — as when giving up a position of royalty such as to resign from being king
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.2.4
Web Links
apathy
1 use
Seeing too much senior apathy, the high school began having juniors declare a major for their senior year.
apathy = lack of interest and enthusiasm
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.8.3
Web Links
augment
3 uses
Our school hired a new counselor to augment our college counseling service.
augment = enlarge or increase
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.1.3
Web Links
bronze
5 uses
1  —5 uses as in:
bronze won't corrode in salt water
The sculpture of a bull on Wall Street is made of bronze.
bronze = a brownish metal that is made of copper and (usually) tin
DefinitionGenerally this sense of bronze means:
a brownish-colored metal with red or yellow hues that is made of copper and (usually) tin
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.2.1
Web Links
candid
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
your candid opinion
Don't worry about my feelings. I'd like your candid opinion.
candid = honest and direct
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 1.1.2
Web Links
complacent
1 use
She had become complacent after years of success.
complacent = unworried and satisfied
DefinitionGenerally complacent means:
contented (unworried and satisfied) — often to a fault
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 2.8.3
Web Links
conciliatory
1 use
Their statements are conciliatory, but their actions are uncompromising.
conciliatory = intended to end bad feelings or build trust
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.2.6
Web Links
contrite
2 uses
She apologized, but didn't seem genuinely contrite.
contrite = sorry
DefinitionGenerally contrite means:
feeling sorrow or regret for a fault or offense
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.10.2
Web Links
depravity
2 uses
It is a terrible story of an innocent who trusted a man who treated her with ruthless depravity.
depravity = immorality or evilness
DefinitionGenerally depravity means:
complete immorality or evilness
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.9.1
Web Links
deride
8 uses
She relentlessly mocks and derides the younger students.
derides = criticizes with strong disrespect
DefinitionGenerally deride means:
to criticize with strong disrespect — often
with humor
Word Statistics
Book8 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.1.1
Web Links
edict
2 uses
The Taliban issued an edict that girls could not attend school.
edict = order
DefinitionGenerally edict means:
an order — typically a formal proclamation or a legally binding court decree
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.1.1
Web Links
efface
3 uses
1  —3 uses as in:
efface the memory
It is a shameful act I have never been able to efface or forget.
efface = remove completely
DefinitionGenerally this sense of efface means:
remove completely from recognition or memory — sometimes by erasing
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePref.
Web Links
enigma
2 uses
As Churchill said about Russia, it is a riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma.
enigma = something mysterious that seems unexplainable
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.4.5
Web Links
envoy
4 uses
The State Department's new envoy to North Korea has a good understanding of the region.
envoy = representative sent on a mission
DefinitionGenerally envoy means:
a representative sent on a mission — often representing a government
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.1.1
Web Links
expedient
3 uses
It was a necessary expedient to get the job done.
expedient = a speedy or practical action

(The word necessary, implies that there were undesired aspects of the action.)
DefinitionGenerally expedient means:
a practical action — especially one that accepts negative tradeoffs due to circumstances

or:

convenient, speedy, or practical
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.10.1
Web Links
heresy
4 uses
It is a hardline form of Sunni Islam that condemns all other strains as heresy.
heresy = something immoral
DefinitionGenerally heresy means:
opinions or actions most people consider immoral
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.5.2
Web Links
olfactory
1 use
Dogs bred for scent-based tasks have higher olfactory capacities than other dogs.
olfactory = relating to the sense of smell
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.7.4
Web Links
prone
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
prone position
The victim was found prone on the floor.
prone = lying face down
DefinitionGenerally this sense of prone means:
lying face downward
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.9.1
Web Links
provincial
1 use
In that well-traveled company I felt uncomfortably provincial.
provincial = unsophisticated (meant disapprovingly—often to refer to old-fashioned or narrow-minded attitudes and ideas)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of provincial means:
unsophisticated (meant disapprovingly to refer to old-fashioned or narrow-minded attitudes and ideas)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.5.1
Web Links
simile
1 use
When she said he was "as subtle as a sledgehammer," she was using ironic simile.
simile = a phrase that highlights similarity between things of different kinds
DefinitionGenerally simile means:
a phrase that highlights similarity between things of different kinds — usually formed with "like" or "as"

as in "It's like looking for a needle in a haystack," or "She is as quiet as a mouse."
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.4.3
Web Links
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