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Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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authenticate
3 uses
I needed authentication from the Attorney General. How do I know it's legitimate?
authentication = proof that something is real

(editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
From page 215.1  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally authenticate means:
establish that something is real or legitimate
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 47, p.215.1
Web Links
coincidence
2 uses
It was too much of a coincidence to be a mere accident.
coincidence = a situation where things happened at the same time by chance even though it was unlikely
From page 24.5  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally coincidence means:
a situation where two things happened at the same time or in the same way by chance even though it was unlikely

(for example, if two students in the same class met by accident while visiting another country)
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library15 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 6, p.24.5
Web Links
contrite
1 use
"I'm glad Becca's all right," Hattie said contritely.
contritely = feeling sorrow or regret for a fault

(editor's note:  Someone was sickened by bad meat and Hattie's husband is the butcher who seems to have been at fault.)
From page 179.4  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally contrite means:
feeling sorrow or regret for a fault or offense
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 40, p.179.4
Web Links
deft
2 uses
He popped some sunflower seeds into his mouth, deftly removed the shells with his teeth, and spat them into Stanley's hole.
deftly = in a skillful manner
From page 32.9  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally deft means:
skillful
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 7, p.32.9
Web Links
fidget
2 uses
His name was Brian, but X-Ray called him Twitch because he was always fidgeting.
fidgeting = making small restless movements
From page 145.1  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally fidget means:
to make small restless movements
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library11 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 32, p.145.1
Web Links
incarcerate
1 use
He was obviously incarcerated for a reason.
incarcerated = put in prison
From page 222.8  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally incarcerate means:
put in prison, or otherwise confine
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 48, p.222.8
Web Links
increment
1 use
Instead they zigzagged back and forth, increasing their altitude by small increments every time they changed directions.
increments = amounts
From page 167.8  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally increment means:
one of a series of increases; or the amount of an increase — especially in small, consistent amounts
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 37, p.167.8
Web Links
parched
2 uses
It was a warm, bubbly, mushy nectar, sweet and tangy. It felt like heaven as it flowed over his dry mouth and down his parched throat.
parched = dry from thirst
From page 157.5  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally parched means:
dried out by heat or excessive exposure to sunlight; or very thirsty
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 24, p.106
Web Links
perimeter
1 use
He unearthed several shovelfuls of dirt in this manner, before it occurred to him that he was dumping his dirt within the perimeter of his hole.
perimeter = boundary (outer edge)
From page 28.4  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally perimeter means:
the outer edge
The exact meaning of perimeter can depend upon its context. For example:
  • "Stay inside the defensive perimeter." — the outer edges of the area that is defended
  • "It is common on the city's perimeter." — the outer edges of the city
  • "What is the perimeter of the square?" — the sum of the length of the sides of a geometric shape
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library12 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 7, p.28.4
Web Links
precarious
1 use
As his tunnel grew deeper and wider, and more precarious, Stanley was able to feel latches on one end of the box,
precarious = unsafe
From page 202.3  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally precarious means:
unsafe or in danger of getting worse — especially in danger of falling
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 44, p.202.3
Web Links
precipice
2 uses
As the ground flattened, a huge stone precipice rose up ahead of him,
precipice = a very steep cliff face
From page 171.1  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally precipice means:
a very steep cliff

or:

any dangerous situation
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 38, p.171.1
Web Links
premise
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
located on the premises
Next to it was another sign which declared that it was a violation of the Texas Penal Code to bring guns, explosives, weapons, drugs, or alcohol onto the premises.
premises = place (land and buildings together)
From page 12.2  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of premises means:
land and/or buildings — especially of a business or organization
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4, p.12.2
Web Links
presumption
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
presumption of innocence
Besides, the shovels were locked up at night, presumably so they couldn't be used as weapons.
presumably = probably

(Editor's note:  The suffix "-ably" is a combination of the suffixes "-able" and "-ly". It means in a manner that is capable of being. This is the same pattern you see in words like agreeably, favorably, and comfortably.)
From page 74.4  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of presumption means:
to think of something as true or likely, even though it is not known with certainty
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library14 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 16, p.74.4
Web Links
proper noun
1 use
That's a capital A. But usually you'll see a small a. You only have capitals at the beginning of a word, and only if it's the start of a sentence, or if it's a proper noun, like a name.
proper noun = a name for an individual person, place, or organization
From page 97.9  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally proper noun means:
in grammar, the part-of-speech for the name of a person, place, or organization — almost always written with an initial capital letter
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 22, p.97.9
Web Links
ratio
2 uses
Stanley weighed three times as much as the other boy. Mrs. Bell wrote the ratio on the board, 3:1, unaware of how much embarrassment she had caused both of them.
ratio = the relative amount of two quantities
From page 7.6  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally ratio means:
the relative magnitudes of two quantities — often expressed as a:b (which could also be expressed as the fraction a/b)
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 3, p.7.5
Web Links
stationery
6 uses
Stanley got his box of stationery and a pen out of his crate.
stationery = paper and envelopes for writing letters
From page 96.8  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
Word Statistics
Book6 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3, p.6.4
Web Links
stock
2 uses
The first Stanley Yelnats, Stanley's great-grandfather, had made a fortune in the stock market.
stock = shares of ownership of corporations
From page 9.6  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of stock means:
shares of ownership of a corporation
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3, p.9.6
Web Links
strenuous
1 use
His legs were sore from remaining rigid for so long. Standing still was more strenuous than walking.
strenuous = difficult
From page 210.9  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally strenuous means:
energetic; or physically or mentally difficult or requiring endurance
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 46, p.210.9
Web Links
suppress
1 use
He glanced downward and had to force himself to suppress a scream.
suppress = hold back
From page 205.7  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally suppress means:
trying to keep under control
The exact meaning of suppress can depend upon its context. For example:
  • "suppressed the revolution" — to stop others from doing something by force
  • "suppressed a smile" — kept something from happening
  • "suppressed the story" — kept news from spreading
  • "suppressed her fear" — controlled an emotion
  • "suppressed the memory" — avoided thinking about (perhaps even removed from conscious memory)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library14 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 45, p.205.7
Web Links
writhe
2 uses
His body writhed in agony.
writhed = twisted in an unnatural way (in this case, because of pain)
From page 91.8  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally writhe means:
to move in a twisting or contorted motion — often of a person when struggling or in pain
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library9 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 22, p.99.8
Web Links
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