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Harry Potter (#7) and the Deathly Hallows

Top-Ranked Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

instructions
accompany
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
accompany on the journey
There will be no need for you to accompany us, Arthur.
accompany = travel along with
DefinitionGenerally this sense of accompany means:
to travel along with
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library9 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 10
1st useChapter 7
Web Links
accord   (3 meanings)
3 meanings, 19 uses
1  —14 uses as in:
according to, or in accord with
They settled to work in the smallest bedroom, which was kept, according to Griphook's preference, in semidarkness.
according to = in keeping with (based upon)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of accord means:
in keeping with; or in agreement/harmony/unity with
This sense of accord is often seen in the form according to or accordingly where it can take on more specific meanings. For example:
  • "According to Kim, ..." — as stated by
  • "To each according to her ability." — based upon
  • "Points are scored according to how well they perform." — depending upon
  • "The dose is calculated according to body weight." — in proportion to
  • "We got a flat tire. Accordingly, I pulled to the side of the road." — because of what was just said; or as a result
Word Statistics
Book14 uses
Library53 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 15
Web Links
2  —4 uses as in:
done of her own accord
My wand acted of its own accord.
own accord = own mind — voluntarily (without anyone asking)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of accord means:
mind
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 5
Web Links
3  —1 use as in:
accord her the respect deserved
The locket was accorded this place of honor not because it was valuable - in all usual senses it was worthless - but because of what it had cost to attain it.
accorded = giving special treatment
DefinitionGenerally this sense of accord means:
to give someone special treatment — especially respect
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
approach   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 13 uses
1  —12 uses as in:
approached the city
Small and fragile and wounded though it was, he did not want to approach it.†
approach = get near
DefinitionGenerally this sense of approach means:
to get closer to (near in space, time, quantity, or quality)
Word Statistics
Book12 uses
Library104 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 23
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
approached her with the proposal
While he tried to decide on the best way to approach his request, the goblin broke the silence.†
approach = speak with someone about
DefinitionGenerally this sense of approach means:
to begin communication with someone about something — often a proposal or a delicate topic
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 24
Web Links
austere
1 use
a beautiful but austere-looking witch wearing a most bizarre-looking headdress.
austere = stern
DefinitionGenerally austere means:
a notable absence of luxury, comfort, or decoration

or:

of a person:  stern in manner; or practicing great self-denial
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 20
Web Links
bard
14 uses
You've never heard of The Tales of Beedle the Bard?
bard = lyric poet
DefinitionGenerally this sense of bard means:
someone who composes and recites or sings poems about important events and people; or (as a proper noun) Shakespeare
Word Statistics
Book14 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 7
Web Links
bound   (5 meanings)
5 meanings, 30 uses
1  —6 uses as in:
She's bound to succeed.
The Death Eaters know Ron's with you now, they're bound to target the family —
bound = almost certain to
DefinitionGenerally this sense of bound means:
almost certain to; or determined to
Word Statistics
Book6 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
bound together
Hermione rummaged for a moment and then extracted from the pile a large volume, bound in faded black leather.
bound = held together (connected or wrapped)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of bound means:
held together (connected or united) or wrapped
The exact meaning of this sense of bound is subject to its context. For example:
  • "The pages of the book are bound with glue." — held together physically
  • "The book is bound in leather." — wrapped or covered
  • "The United States and England are bound together by a common language." — connected or united (tied together metaphorically)
  • "She cleaned the wound and bound it with fresh bandages." — wrapped
  • "She is wheelchair-bound." — connected (moves with a wheelchair because she is unable to walk)
  • "The jacket has bound buttonholes." — edges wrapped by fabric or trim rather than stitches
  • "She's the one in the bound-edge hat." — where the edge of the hat is wrapped in a decorative material.
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library16 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 6
Web Links
3  —18 uses as in:
I can't/must. I'm bound by...
The moment she had sat down, chains clinked out of the arms of the chair and bound her there.
bound = tied up
DefinitionGenerally this sense of bound means:
to be constrained in some way — such as tied up, prevented, required, or obligated
The exact meaning of this sense of bound is subject to its context. For example:
  • "Her wrists were bound." — tied up
  • "I am bound by my word." — required or obligated (in this case to keep a promise)
  • "It is a binding contract." — must be obeyed (The people who signed the contract are legally required to do what it says or suffer legal penalties.)
  • "He is muscle bound." — prevented from moving easily (due to having such large, tight muscles)
Word Statistics
Book18 uses
Library12 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 13
Web Links
4  —2 uses as in:
the binding is loose
Scrimgeour now pulled out of the bag a small book that looked as ancient as the copy of Secrets of the Darkest Art upstairs. Its binding was stained and peeling in places.
binding = the part of a book that holds the pages together
DefinitionGenerally this sense of binding means:
something that holds things together, or wraps or covers or ties something
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 23
Web Links
5  —3 uses as in:
The deer bound across the trail.
But with a great creaking of rusty bedsprings, Ron bounded off the bed and got there first.
bounded = jumped or leaped
DefinitionGenerally this sense of bound means:
to leap or jump
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library13 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 34
Web Links
disparage
1 use
Snape made a small, disparaging noise.
disparaging = contemptuous (critical and disrespectful)
DefinitionGenerally disparage means:
to criticize or make seem less important — especially in a disrespectful or contemptuous manner
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 33
Web Links
illustrate
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
as illustrated by this example
"It sort of floated toward me," said Ron, illustrating the movement with his free index finger, "right to my chest, and then — it just went straight through."†
illustrating = demonstrating
DefinitionGenerally this sense of illustrate means:
to help make clear — typically by example
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 10
1st useChapter 19
Web Links
nevertheless
14 uses
Ginny did not seek another one-to-one meeting with Harry for the rest of the day, nor by any look or gesture did she show that they had shared more than polite conversation in her room. Nevertheless, Charlie's arrival came as a relief to Harry.
It provided a distraction...
nevertheless = in spite of that (used to connect contrasting ideas)
DefinitionGenerally nevertheless means:
in spite of that (Used to connect contrasting ideas. Other synonyms could include words and phrases such as nonetheless, all the same, still,  and however.)
Word Statistics
Book14 uses
Library14 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 3
Web Links
tone
25 uses
There was something strange in Lupin's tone, it was almost cold.
tone = the general feeling, mood, or attitude of something
DefinitionGenerally this sense of tone means:
the general feeling, mood, or attitude of something — especially of something said or written
Word Statistics
Book25 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
trace   (3 meanings)
3 meanings, 15 uses
1  —9 uses as in:
found a trace of
The sky was now tinged with the faintest trace of pink.
trace = small quantity or indication
DefinitionGenerally this sense of trace means:
a small quantity; or any indication or evidence of
The exact meaning of this sense of trace depends upon its context. For example:
  • a small indication that something was present — as in "The plane disappeared somewhere over the Pacific Ocean without leaving a trace."
  • a very small amount of something — as in "The blood test showed a trace of steroids."
  • any evidence of something — as in "We did not find a trace of the gene."
Word Statistics
Book9 uses
Library9 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 16
Web Links
2  —5 uses as in:
trace the origin or development
"Yes, but we're still going to have to try and trace the real locket, aren't we?" said Hermione, "to find out whether or not it's destroyed."
trace = find
DefinitionGenerally this sense of trace means:
to find, search, research, or keep track of
This sense of trace usually has to do with information. It's specific meaning depends on its context. For example:
to find or search for something through investigation — often the origin of something:
  • "The police traced the call." — found out where it originated
  • "We are tracing the lost luggage" — searching for
  • "Can you trace the problem to its source?" — find through investigation
  • "She traced her family history to discover that her great-grandmother came to the United States from Lithuania when the Nazis occupied it." — discovered something through investigation
to research or report on the development of something
  • "She traced the history of the automobile in her paper." — researched the development of something
  • "Her presentation traced recent progress in alternative energy solutions." — reported on
to monitor or keep track of the progress or development of something
  • "She traces the progress of at-risk students." — monitors information
  • "I used binoculars to trace her progress up the mountain." — monitor, follow, or track
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library16 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 21
Web Links
3  —1 use as in:
trace a picture or outline
The letter was an incredible treasure, proof that Lily Potter had lived, really lived, that her warm hand had once moved across this parchment, tracing ink into these letters, these words, words about him, Harry, her son.
tracing = drawing
DefinitionGenerally this sense of trace means:
copy the lines of an image; or draw an outline; or carefully draw a specific pattern
This sense of trace has to do with drawing, but it's specific meaning depends on its context. For example:
copying the outline of an image
  • "She used tracing paper to make a copy." — paper you can see through, so that when it is placed on a picture, you can use a pencil to follow the lines of the image being copied
  • "She projected the image onto the wall, hung a sheet of paper there, and traced the projected image onto the paper." — followed the lines with her pencil
draw an outline or a specific pattern
  • "She used her toe to trace half the fish symbol in the sand." — draw a simple outline
  • "The child used a stick to trace circles and swirls in the mud." — draw
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library16 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 10
Web Links
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