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Harry Potter (#6) and the Half-Blood Prince
Vocabulary

Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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austere
1 use
There was no cheerful Hagrid waiting for them at King's Cross Station. Instead, two grim-faced, bearded Aurors in dark Muggle suits ... marched them into the station without speaking.
  "Quick, quick, through the barrier," said Mrs. Weasley, who seemed a little flustered by this austere efficiency.
austere = stern (lacking comfort)
DefinitionGenerally austere means:
a notable absence of luxury, comfort, or decoration

or:

of a person:  stern in manner; or practicing great self-denial
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 7
Web Links
demented
2 uses
... and Luna, who was now wearing her free Spectrespecs, which gave her the look of a demented, multicolored owl.
demented = crazy (affected by madness or extreme distress or anger)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of demented means:
acting crazy

or:

suffering from cognitive dementia (mental deterioration)
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 7
Web Links
deride
2 uses
...said Harry, who could not quite keep a note of derision out of his voice:
derision = disrespect — typically while laughing at or making fun of
DefinitionGenerally deride means:
laugh at or make fun of—while showing a lack of respect
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
disdain
2 uses
Ron gagged on a large piece of kipper. Hermione spared him one look of disdain before turning back to Harry.
disdain = showing a lack of respect and distaste
DefinitionGenerally disdain means:
a lack of respect — often suggesting distaste and an undeserved sense of superiority

or:

to reject as not good enough
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 26
Web Links
disparate
1 use
transform these disparate elements
disparate = very different
DefinitionGenerally disparate means:
very different — often referring to a collection of very different elements such as a group of very different people
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 18
Web Links
duplicity
1 use
asked Harry, who wanted every detail of Snape's duplicity and infamy, feverishly collecting more reasons to hate him, to swear vengeance.
duplicity = deception — such as lying
DefinitionGenerally duplicity means:
deception (lying to or misleading others) — usually over an extended period
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 29
Web Links
efficacious
1 use
"I do thank you for taking the time, Pomona," Slughorn was saying courteously, "most authorities agree that they are at their most efficacious if picked at twilight."
efficacious = effective in producing an intended effect
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 22
Web Links
furtive
3 uses
A long way along the table Hermione was sitting alone, playing with her stew. Harry noticed Ron looking at her furtively.
furtively = in a way intended to escape notice
DefinitionGenerally furtive means:
taking pains to avoid being observed

or:

in a manner indicating nervousness (being cautious or appearing suspicious)
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 15
Web Links
haughty
4 uses
To his surprise, Professor Trelawney drew herself up at this suggestion, looking haughty.
haughty = arrogant or condescending (acting superior or self-important)
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 7
Web Links
inarticulate
1 use
Harry uttered an inarticulate yell of rage: In that instant, he cared not whether he lived or died.
inarticulate = verbally expressing a feeling without words
DefinitionGenerally inarticulate means:
unable to communicate clearly (or to use words) in various senses such as:
  • unable to find good words to express oneself — "She gets nervous and inarticulate whenever he's around."
  • verbally expressing a feeling without words — "She uttered an inarticulate cry of despair."
  • unable to make oneself heard and understood — "She mumbled inarticulately."
  • unable to speak — "She was inarticulate with rage."


or (more rarely): a feeling or idea that is not expressed — as in "We shared an inarticulate fear."
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 28
Web Links
ingenious
4 uses
"Yeah, very ingenious, Hermione."
ingenious = showing inventiveness and skill
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
morose
3 uses
"I had him from an egg, yeh know," said Hagrid morosely.
morosely = with great sadness
DefinitionGenerally morose means:
unhappy — often with a withdrawn personality
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
persistent
2 uses
The Prime Minister did not know what to say to this, but a persistent habit of wishing to appear well-informed on any subject that came up made him cast around for any details he could remember of their previous conversations.
persistent = continuing
DefinitionGenerally persistent means:
continuing — especially despite difficulties or opposition
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
pretense
4 uses
Nobody seemed to find Scrimgeour's pretense that he did not know Harry's name convincing,
pretense = an appearance or action to help one pretend
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 27
Web Links
procure
4 uses
Why did you stop the Dark Lord procuring the Sorcerer's Stone?
procuring = getting by special effort
DefinitionGenerally procure means:
get by special effort
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
remonstrate
1 use
Hermione's remonstration was drowned by a loud giggle; Lavender Brown had apparently found Ron's remark highly amusing.
remonstration = argument in protest or opposition
DefinitionGenerally remonstrate means:
argue in protest or opposition
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 9
Web Links
reprove
3 uses
"Tom, Tom, if I knew I couldn't tell you," said Slughorn, wagging a reproving, sugar-covered finger at Riddle, though ruining the effect slightly by winking.
reproving = critical (expressing disapproval)
DefinitionGenerally reprove means:
to express disapproval of one's actions to them
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 23
Web Links
resolute
5 uses
He pushed past Harry, his face turned resolutely away with the air of a man trying to resist temptation.
resolutely = firm in purpose
DefinitionGenerally resolute means:
firm in purpose or belief
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
surreptitious
5 uses
You just drop one surreptitiously and it'll run off and make a nice loud noise out of sight, giving you a diversion if you need one.
surreptitiously = without being noticed
DefinitionGenerally surreptitious means:
done secretly or in a manner that avoids notice
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
sycophant
1 use
"That sounds good, sir," said Ernie sycophantically, rubbing his hands together.
sycophantically = in a manner of one overly eager to please someone in authority in order to gain personal advantage
DefinitionGenerally sycophant means:
a person who tries to flatter or please someone in authority in order to gain personal advantage
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 22
Web Links
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