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Harry Potter (#2) and the Chamber of Secrets

Top-Ranked Words with Typical Sample Sentences

instructions
accompany
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
accompany on the journey
The nurse accompanies the old woman everywhere.
accompanies = travels with
DefinitionGenerally this sense of accompany means:
to travel along with
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library9 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 10
1st useChapter 14
Web Links
bound   (4 meanings)
4 meanings, 9 uses
1  —3 uses as in:
She's bound to succeed.
She's bound to get into a good college.
bound = almost certain to
DefinitionGenerally this sense of bound means:
almost certain to; or determined to
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 6
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
bound together
The pieces of bread are moistened and bound together with eggs and a small amount of flour.
bound = held together
DefinitionGenerally this sense of bound means:
held together (connected or united) or wrapped
The exact meaning of this sense of bound is subject to its context. For example:
  • "The pages of the book are bound with glue." — held together physically
  • "The book is bound in leather." — wrapped or covered
  • "The United States and England are bound together by a common language." — connected or united (tied together metaphorically)
  • "She cleaned the wound and bound it with fresh bandages." — wrapped
  • "She is wheelchair-bound." — connected (moves with a wheelchair because she is unable to walk)
  • "The jacket has bound buttonholes." — edges wrapped by fabric or trim rather than stitches
  • "She's the one in the bound-edge hat." — where the edge of the hat is wrapped in a decorative material.
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library16 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 8
Web Links
3  —1 use as in:
I can't/must. I'm bound by...
The suspect sat in the cell with her wrists bound by rope.
bound = tied together
DefinitionGenerally this sense of bound means:
to be constrained in some way — such as tied up, prevented, required, or obligated
The exact meaning of this sense of bound is subject to its context. For example:
  • "Her wrists were bound." — tied up
  • "I am bound by my word." — required or obligated (in this case to keep a promise)
  • "It is a binding contract." — must be obeyed (The people who signed the contract are legally required to do what it says or suffer legal penalties.)
  • "He is muscle bound." — prevented from moving easily (due to having such large, tight muscles)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library12 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
4  —4 uses as in:
The deer bound across the trail.
She's the sort of person who bounds out of bed in the morning and runs five miles before starting her day.
bounds = jumps
DefinitionGenerally this sense of bound means:
to leap or jump
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library13 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3
Web Links
culprit
6 uses
We will find and punish the culprit.
culprit = person responsible for a wrongdoing
DefinitionGenerally culprit means:
someone responsible for a wrongdoing — especially a criminal; or something that caused a problem
Word Statistics
Book6 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 13
Web Links
demonstrate
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
It demonstrates my point.
The salesperson demonstrated features of both phones so I could compare them.
demonstrated = showed
DefinitionGenerally this sense of demonstrate means:
to show
The exact meaning of this sense of demonstrate can depend upon its context. For example:
  • "I will demonstrate how to throw a Frisbee." — show how to do something
  • "I will demonstrate how much quicker the new computer is than the old one." — show how something works
  • "Her questioned demonstrated that she was listening and thinking deeply about what was said." — showed to be true or proved
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library22 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 11
Web Links
disgruntled
2 uses
The shooter was a disgruntled employee.
disgruntled = unhappy and angry
DefinitionGenerally disgruntled means:
in a bad mood - typically unhappy and annoyed
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 6
Web Links
expulsion
26 uses
Her records shows expulsion from two schools.
expulsion = the act of forcing out (in this case, kicking someone out of school)
DefinitionGenerally expulsion means:
the act of forcing out
especially in 2 primary senses:
  • kicking someone out of an organization — such as a school or country
  • squeezing something to eliminate a liquid or gas
Word Statistics
Book26 uses
Library12 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 5
Web Links
grievous
2 uses
She suffered grievous bodily harm.
grievous = very serious; or very bad
DefinitionGenerally grievous means:
very serious; or very bad; or causing grief
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
lurid
2 uses
Her blog specializes in sharing lurid details of horrible crimes.
lurid = shocking and disturbing
DefinitionGenerally lurid means:
shocking, as from disturbing details of a horrible story, or a color more vivid (bright or deep) than would be expected
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 13
Web Links
morose
2 uses
She drank alone in the corner, looking morose.
morose = unhappy
DefinitionGenerally morose means:
unhappy — often with a withdrawn personality
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 8
Web Links
nevertheless
2 uses
The class was hard. Nevertheless, it was my favorite.
nevertheless = in spite of that (used to connect contrasting ideas)
DefinitionGenerally nevertheless means:
in spite of that (Used to connect contrasting ideas. Other synonyms could include words and phrases such as nonetheless, all the same, still,  and however.)
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library14 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 10
Web Links
passage
1 use
Each passage below is followed by a number of questions.
passage = a short part of a longer written work
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 10
Web Links
petulant
1 use
She stomped her foot like a petulant child.
petulant = unreasonably annoyed or upset
DefinitionGenerally petulant means:
unreasonably annoyed or upset

or:

easily annoyed or upset
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 12
Web Links
serpent
15 uses
There was a picture of a serpent eating its tail.
serpent = snake
DefinitionGenerally serpent means:
a snake
Word Statistics
Book15 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 16
Web Links
tone
7 uses
Which of the following words best maintains the tone established in this passage.
tone = general feeling
DefinitionGenerally this sense of tone means:
the general feeling, mood, or attitude of something — especially of something said or written
Word Statistics
Book7 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 8
Web Links
trace   (3 meanings)
3 meanings, 6 uses
1  —3 uses as in:
found a trace of
There was not a trace of the defendant's DNA at the crime scene.
trace = a tiny quantity or indication
DefinitionGenerally this sense of trace means:
a small quantity; or any indication or evidence of
The exact meaning of this sense of trace depends upon its context. For example:
  • a small indication that something was present — as in "The plane disappeared somewhere over the Pacific Ocean without leaving a trace."
  • a very small amount of something — as in "The blood test showed a trace of steroids."
  • any evidence of something — as in "We did not find a trace of the gene."
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library9 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 13
Web Links
2  —2 uses as in:
trace the origin or development
Early cat domestication is traced back to China over 5,000 years ago.
traced = found through investigation
DefinitionGenerally this sense of trace means:
to find, search, research, or keep track of
This sense of trace usually has to do with information. It's specific meaning depends on its context. For example:
to find or search for something through investigation — often the origin of something:
  • "The police traced the call." — found out where it originated
  • "We are tracing the lost luggage" — searching for
  • "Can you trace the problem to its source?" — find through investigation
  • "She traced her family history to discover that her great-grandmother came to the United States from Lithuania when the Nazis occupied it." — discovered something through investigation
to research or report on the development of something
  • "She traced the history of the automobile in her paper." — researched the development of something
  • "Her presentation traced recent progress in alternative energy solutions." — reported on
to monitor or keep track of the progress or development of something
  • "She traces the progress of at-risk students." — monitors information
  • "I used binoculars to trace her progress up the mountain." — monitor, follow, or track
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library16 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 18
Web Links
3  —1 use as in:
trace a picture or outline
She didn't have a camera or a copier, so she used a pencil to trace an outline of the picture on thin paper.
trace = draw (by following the image)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of trace means:
copy the lines of an image; or draw an outline; or carefully draw a specific pattern
This sense of trace has to do with drawing, but it's specific meaning depends on its context. For example:
copying the outline of an image
  • "She used tracing paper to make a copy." — paper you can see through, so that when it is placed on a picture, you can use a pencil to follow the lines of the image being copied
  • "She projected the image onto the wall, hung a sheet of paper there, and traced the projected image onto the paper." — followed the lines with her pencil
draw an outline or a specific pattern
  • "She used her toe to trace half the fish symbol in the sand." — draw a simple outline
  • "The child used a stick to trace circles and swirls in the mud." — draw
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library16 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 17
Web Links
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