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Harry Potter (#2) and the Chamber of Secrets

Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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abject
1 use
Dobby went scurrying in after him, crouching at the hem of his cloak, a look of abject terror on his face.
abject = extreme (in a negative sense)
DefinitionGenerally abject means:
extreme (in a negative sense such as misery, hopelessness, submissiveness, cruelty, or cowardice)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 18
Web Links
amble
2 uses
I'd like a few more words with Harry ...... Lockhart ambled out.†
ambled = walked leisurely
DefinitionGenerally amble means:
to walk leisurely or slowly
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
apprehensive
2 uses
...Mr. and Mrs. Granger, who were watching apprehensively.
apprehensively = with worry
DefinitionGenerally apprehensive means:
worried over possible misfortune
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
buoyant
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
buoyant personality
Every other teacher in the place was looking grimmer than usual, but Lockhart appeared nothing short of buoyant.
buoyant = cheerful and optimistic
DefinitionGenerally this sense of buoyant means:
characterized by cheerfulness and optimism; or a tendency to maintain or quickly recover cheerfulness and optimism after setbacks
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 15
Web Links
conjure
3 uses
In the end, Professor McGonagall conjured a large fan out of thin air,
conjured = created by magic
DefinitionGenerally conjure means:
summon into action or bring into existence — often as if by magic
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library11 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 11
Web Links
docile
1 use
And miraculously — inexplicably — the snake slumped to the floor, docile as a thick, black garden hose, its eyes now on Harry.
docile = easily managed
DefinitionGenerally docile means:
easily led or managed — perhaps submissive or well-behaved
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 11
Web Links
flout
1 use
He cleared his throat and said, "Professor Dumbledore, these boys have flouted the Decree for the Restriction of Underage Wizardry, caused serious damage to an old and valuable tree —"
flouted = openly disregarding
DefinitionGenerally flout means:
to openly disregard — typically a law, rule, or custom
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 5
Web Links
forgery
1 use
Madam Pince held the note up to the light, as though determined to detect a forgery, but it passed the test.
forgery = something that is represented as real even though it is a fake
DefinitionGenerally forgery means:
something that is represented as real even though it is a fake; or the making of such a fake item
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 10
Web Links
gullible
1 use
A tale told to frighten the gullible.
gullible = people easily tricked because of being too trusting
DefinitionGenerally gullible means:
easily tricked because of being too trusting
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 9
Web Links
inclined
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
on an incline or incline his head
Riddle stopped suddenly, his head inclined in the direction of new noises.
inclined = angled (or bent)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of incline means:
to be at an angle or to bend
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library10 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 13
Web Links
incredulous
3 uses
"Aren't you finished yet?" called Ron incredulously.
incredulously = having difficulty accepting something so unexpected
DefinitionGenerally incredulous means:
unbelieving; or having difficulty accepting something so unexpected
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library11 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 7
Web Links
manor
5 uses
Judging by the fact that Draco Malfoy usually had the best of everything, his family was rolling in wizard gold; he could just see Malfoy strutting around a large manor house.
manor = large house of a lord or wealthy person
DefinitionGenerally manor means:
a large house of a lord or wealthy person; or the house and the land around it
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3
Web Links
ominous
2 uses
"Explain," she said, her glasses glinting ominously.
ominously = in a threatening way
DefinitionGenerally ominous means:
threatening (suggestive of, or foreshadowing bad things to come)
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library10 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 5
Web Links
perturb
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
she was perturbed
Hagrid didn't seem perturbed by Ron's slug problem, which Harry hastily explained as he lowered Ron into a chair.
perturbed = disturbed or made uneasy
DefinitionGenerally this sense of perturb means:
to disturb in mind or make uneasy
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 7
Web Links
repute
1 use
"Weasley has brought the Ministry into disrepute," Mr. Malfoy told our reporter.
disrepute = bad reputation

(Editor's note:  The prefix "dis-" in disrepute means not or opposite. It reverses the meaning of repute as seen in words like disagree, disconnect, and disappear.)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of repute means:
the state of one's reputation — can be high/good or low/bad
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 12
Web Links
resignation   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 2 uses
1  —1 use as in:
submitted her resignation
...called today for Mr. Weasley's resignation.
resignation = quitting from his position
DefinitionGenerally this sense of resignation means:
to quit — especially a job or position; or a document expressing such an act
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library12 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 12
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
accepted it with resignation
Ron sighed as though resigned to the worst
resigned = having accepted as unavoidable
DefinitionGenerally this sense of resignation means:
acceptance of something undesired as unavoidable or the lesser of evils
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 15
Web Links
torpor
1 use
And within five minutes, the class had sunk back into its usual torpor.
torpor = lethargy (lack of energy or vigor)
DefinitionGenerally torpor means:
in people:  inactivity resulting from lethargy and lack of vigor or energy

or:

in animals:  a condition of biological rest or suspended animation — (could be in the evening, during the cold, or as in a dormant state all winter)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 9
Web Links
tumult
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
couldn't hear over the tumult
The teams walked onto the field to tumultuous applause.
tumultuous = loud and unrestrained
DefinitionGenerally this sense of tumult means:
loud noise — usually created by an unrestrained crowd or some kind of confusion
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 14
Web Links
wizened
1 use
A wizened, fraillooking wizard, bald except for a few wisps of white hair, was reading a letter by candlelight.
wizened = lean and wrinkled
DefinitionGenerally wizened means:
thin and wrinkled — typically from age or illness
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 13
Web Links
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Sample usage followed by this mark was not checked by an editor. Please let us know if you spot a problem.
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