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Harry Potter (#2) and the Chamber of Secrets
Vocabulary

Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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baleful
1 use
Harry stared at it and the bird looked balefully back, making its gagging noise again.
balefully = in a threatening manner
DefinitionGenerally baleful means:
threatening or harmful
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 12
Web Links
conjure
3 uses
In the end, Professor McGonagall conjured a large fan out of thin air,
conjured = created by magic
DefinitionGenerally conjure means:
summon into action or bring into existence — often as if by magic
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 11
Web Links
divine   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 2 uses
1  —1 use as in:
to forgive is divine
I wish he was mine, he's really divine,
divine = wonderful
DefinitionGenerally this sense of divine means:
wonderful; or god-like or coming from God
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 13
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
divined from tea leaves
It's never too early to think about the future, so I'd recommend Divination.
divination = to predict something by magic

(editor's note:  In the book, Divination is used as a proper noun referring to a class on the subject—much as Geometry is the name of a class about geometry.)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of divine means:
to predict or discover something supernaturally (as if by magic)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 14
Web Links
fervent
2 uses
"That," said Ron fervently, "was the best story you've ever come up with."
fervently = with much excitement (intense emotion)
DefinitionGenerally fervent means:
characterized by intense emotion or passionate belief
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 9
Web Links
forgery
1 use
Madam Pince held the note up to the light, as though determined to detect a forgery, but it passed the test.
forgery = something that is represented as real even though it is a fake
DefinitionGenerally forgery means:
something that is represented as real even though it is a fake; or the making of such a fake item
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 10
Web Links
gullible
1 use
A tale told to frighten the gullible.
gullible = people easily tricked because of being too trusting
DefinitionGenerally gullible means:
easily tricked because of being too trusting
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 9
Web Links
inclined
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
on an incline or incline his head
Riddle stopped suddenly, his head inclined in the direction of new noises.
inclined = angled (or bent)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of incline means:
to be at an angle or to bend
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library9 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 13
Web Links
incredulous
3 uses
"Aren't you finished yet?" called Ron incredulously.
incredulously = having difficulty accepting something so unexpected
DefinitionGenerally incredulous means:
unbelieving; or having difficulty accepting something so unexpected
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library10 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 7
Web Links
ludicrous
2 uses
Fred and George, at least, thought the idea of his being Slytherin's heir was quite ludicrous.
ludicrous = ridiculous or absurd in an amusing way
DefinitionGenerally ludicrous means:
absurd in an amusing way
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 9
Web Links
ominous
2 uses
"Explain," she said, her glasses glinting ominously.
ominously = in a threatening way
DefinitionGenerally ominous means:
threatening (suggestive of, or foreshadowing bad things to come)
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library11 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 5
Web Links
perturb
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
she was perturbed
Hagrid didn't seem perturbed by Ron's slug problem, which Harry hastily explained as he lowered Ron into a chair.
perturbed = disturbed or made uneasy
DefinitionGenerally this sense of perturb means:
to disturb in mind or make uneasy
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 7
Web Links
repute
1 use
"Weasley has brought the Ministry into disrepute," Mr. Malfoy told our reporter.
disrepute = bad reputation
DefinitionGenerally this sense of repute means:
the state of one's reputation — can be high/good or low/bad
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 12
Web Links
resignation   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 2 uses
1  —1 use as in:
submitted her resignation
...called today for Mr. Weasley's resignation.
resignation = quitting from his position
DefinitionGenerally this sense of resignation means:
to quit — especially a job or position; or a document expressing such an act
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library10 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 12
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
accepted it with resignation
Ron sighed as though resigned to the worst
resigned = having accepted as unavoidable
DefinitionGenerally this sense of resignation means:
acceptance of something undesired as unavoidable or the lesser of evils
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library11 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 15
Web Links
resplendent
1 use
Gilderoy Lockhart was walking onto the stage, resplendent in robes of deep plum and accompanied by none other than Snape, wearing his usual black.
resplendent = magnificent or impressive
DefinitionGenerally resplendent means:
beautiful or splendid

(splendid is magnificent, impressive, or brilliant)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 11
Web Links
revere
1 use
"Harry Potter is humble and modest," said Dobby reverently,
reverently = with deep respect and admiration
DefinitionGenerally revere means:
regard with feelings of deep respect and admiration — sometimes with a mixture of wonder and awe or fear
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library12 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
somber
2 uses
Dumbledore came in, looking very somber.
somber = grave or gloomy
DefinitionGenerally somber means:
serious and without cheer — perhaps even gloomy

or:

lacking brightness or color
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library9 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 12
Web Links
torpor
1 use
And within five minutes, the class had sunk back into its usual torpor.
torpor = lethargy (lack of energy or vigor)
DefinitionGenerally torpor means:
in people:  inactivity resulting from lethargy and lack of vigor or energy

or:

in animals:  a condition of biological rest or suspended animation — (could be in the evening, during the cold, or as in a dormant state all winter)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 9
Web Links
wizened
1 use
A wizened, fraillooking wizard, bald except for a few wisps of white hair, was reading a letter by candlelight.
wizened = lean and wrinkled
DefinitionGenerally wizened means:
thin and wrinkled — typically from age or illness
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 13
Web Links
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