toggle menu
menu
vocabulary
1000+ books
Book Menu

Harry Potter (#1) and the Sorcerer's Stone

Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

instructions
abysmal
1 use
Even Neville scraped through, his good Herbology mark making up for his abysmal Potions one.
abysmal = terrible
From page 307.5  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of abysmal means:
very bad
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 17, p.307.5
Web Links
bias
1 use
The idea of overtaking Slytherin in the house championship was wonderful, no one had done it for seven years, but would they be allowed to, with such a biased referee?
biased = having a personal preference that prevents objectivity
From page 221.4  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally bias means:
a personal preference — especially a prejudice that prevents objective consideration

or:

any tendency to move in a particular direction — such as a car that tends to want to swerve toward the right
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 13, p.221.4
Web Links
chivalry
1 use
  There's nothing hidden in your head
  The Sorting Hat can't see,
  So try me on and I will tell you
  Where you ought to be.
  You might belong in Gryffindor,
  Where dwell the brave at heart,
  Their daring, nerve, and chivalry
  Set Gryffindors apart;
chivalry = medieval principles governing knightly conduct such as honor, kindness, bravery, and protection of the weak
From page 118.1  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally chivalry means:
the medieval principles governing knighthood and knightly conduct such as honor, kindness, bravery, and protection of the weak

or:

courtesy — especially of men towards women
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 7, p.118.1
Web Links
conjure
1 use
...the three of them were out in the freezing courtyard during break, and she had conjured them up a bright blue fire that could be carried around in a jam jar.
conjured = created by magic
From page 181.6  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally conjure means:
summon into action or bring into existence — often as if by magic
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library11 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 11, p.181.6
Web Links
convention
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
The Geneva Convention
Dragon breeding was outlawed by the Warlocks' Convention of 1709, everyone knows that.
convention = a written international agreement
From page 230.9  Typical Usage
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 14, p.230.9
Web Links
cower
1 use
The Dursleys were cowering against the wall.
cowering = showing fear by positioning the body as though afraid of being hit
From page 49.8  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally cower means:
show fear by positioning the body as though afraid of being hit
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4, p.49.8
Web Links
cunning
1 use
  Or perhaps in Slytherin
  You'll make your real friends,
  Those cunning folk use any means
  To achieve their ends.
cunning = clever and deceptive
From page 118.4  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of cunning means:
being good at achieving goals through cleverness — and typically through deception as well (tricking others)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 7, p.118.4
Web Links
diversion
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
a diversion to draw troops away
And I'd bet my broomstick he let that troll in, to make a diversion!
diversion = distraction
From page 183.5  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of diversion means:
a distraction — something that draws someone's attention so they don't notice something else
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 11, p.183.5
Web Links
dumfounded
1 use
  "What's your Quidditch team?" Ron asked.
  "Er — I don't know any," Harry confessed.
  "What!" Ron looked dumbfounded. "Oh, you wait, it's the best game in the world —" And he was off, explaining all about...
dumbfounded = surprised (not in a frightening way, but in a way that makes you search for words)
From page 107.9  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally dumfounded means:
very surprised - often too surprised to know what to say or do
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 6, p.107.9
Web Links
gaunt
1 use
Harry looked over at the Slytherin table and saw a horrible ghost sitting there, with blank staring eyes, a gaunt face, and robes stained with silver blood.
gaunt = very thin and long-suffering
From page 124.7  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally gaunt means:
very thin and bony — often from hunger or as though having been worn to the bone
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 7, p.124.7
Web Links
heed
1 use
  Enter, stranger, but take heed
  Of what awaits the sin of greed,
heed = pay close attention
From page 72.9  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally heed means:
pay close attention to; or to do what is suggested — especially with regard to a warning or other advice
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 5, p.72.9
Web Links
meddle
2 uses
It was a bit late to repair the damage, but Harry swore to himself not to meddle in things that weren't his business from now on.
meddle = get involved
From page 245.4  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally meddle means:
interfere (in another's affairs or business); or handle (something that shouldn't be handled)
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 15, p.246.6
Web Links
pliable
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
a pliable material
Your father, on the other hand, favored a mahogany wand. Eleven inches. Pliable. A little more power and excellent for transfiguration.
pliable = capable of being bent without breaking
From page 82.9  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of pliable means:
capable of being bent (or perhaps shaped) without breaking
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 5, p.82.9
Web Links
sallow
1 use
Professor Quirrell, in his absurd turban, was talking to a teacher with greasy black hair, a hooked nose, and sallow skin.
sallow = pale or yellowish (looking unhealthy)
From page 126.3  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of sallow means:
an unhealthy pale of yellowish complexion; or to cause such a complexion
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 7, p.126.3
Web Links
serpent
2 uses
A huge banner showing the Slytherin serpent covered the wall behind the High Table.
serpent = snake
From page 304.6  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally serpent means:
a snake
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 17, p.304.6
Web Links
stoke
1 use
He was humming merrily as he stoked the fire.
stoked = added fuel or stirred a fire to make it burn hotter
From page 233.9  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally stoke means:
to add fuel or stir a fire to make it burn hotter; or to make feelings stronger
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 14, p.233.9
Web Links
subtle
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
a subtle difference or thinker
You are here to learn the subtle science and exact art of potionmaking,
subtle = difficult to understand without adequate sensitivity and relevant knowledge
From page 136.9  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of subtle means:
not obvious, but understandable by someone with adequate sensitivity and relevant knowledge (perhaps depending upon fine distinctions)

or:

capable of understanding things that require sensitivity and relevant knowledge (perhaps understanding fine distinctions)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 8, p.136.9
Web Links
supple
1 use
Not to worry, we'll find the perfect match here somewhere—I wonder, now— —yes, why not—unusual combination—holly and phoenix feather, eleven inches, nice and supple.
supple = bending easily
From page 84.9  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally supple means:
moving and bending easily — sometimes used figuratively to indicate mental flexibility when adapting to different conditions
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 5, p.84.9
Web Links
transfigure
1 use
McGonagall transfigured the chessmen to make them alive;
transfigured = completely changed the nature of
From page 284.3  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally transfigure means:
change completely the nature or appearance of — especially in a positive way
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 16, p.284.3
Web Links
wizened
1 use
A wizened old guard was up by the ticket barrier,
wizened = lean and wrinkled
From page 308.1  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally wizened means:
thin and wrinkled — typically from age or illness
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 17, p.308.1
Web Links
Go to Book Menu
Take Pre-Reading Quiz
SAT® is a registered trademark of the College Board, which is not affiliated with verbalworkout.com™, and does not endorse this site.