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The Giver

Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

instructions
acquisition
3 uses
The acquisition of wisdom will come through his training.
acquisition = possession (getting)
From page 63.4  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally acquisition means:
obtaining possession of something; or the thing possessed
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 7, p.54.4
Web Links
annex
13 uses
1  —13 uses as in:
annex of the main building
Jonas nodded, waved to her, and headed around the building toward the Annex, a small wing attached to the back.
annex = an addition that extends a main building
From page 72.7  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of annex means:
an addition that extends a main building

or:

to attach something — especially to something larger or more important
Word Statistics
Book13 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 9, p.68.5
Web Links
aptitude
3 uses
Well, it was clear to me — and my parents later confessed that it had been obvious to them, too — what my aptitude was.
aptitude = natural ability
From page 15.4  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2, p.15.4
Web Links
attribute
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
It is an attribute of...
"The fourth essential attribute," the Chief Elder said, "is wisdom."
attribute = characteristic
From page 63.3  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of attribute means:
a characteristic (of something or someone)
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 8, p.61.7
Web Links
chastise
10 uses
It was a minor rule, rather like rudeness, punishable only by gentle chastisement.
chastisement = criticism
From page 27.4  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally chastise means:
to scold or criticize
Word Statistics
Book10 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3, p.20.9
Web Links
correspond
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
corresponding time period
All of the factors — disposition, energy level, intelligence, and interests — had to correspond and to interact perfectly.
correspond = fit together
From page 48.8  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of correspond means:
connect or fit together by being equivalent, proportionate, or matched

(Two things are equivalent if they have the same or very similar value, purpose, or result.)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 6, p.48.8
Web Links
designate   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 5 uses
1  —3 uses as in:
designated driver
"For example," she said, smiling, "we did not consider for an instant designating Asher an Instructor of Threes." ... The Instructors of Threes were in charge of the acquisition of correct language.
designating = assigning
From page 54.3  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of designate means:
assign someone or something for a particular purpose
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 7, p.54.3
Web Links
2  —2 uses as in:
designated by a star on the map
The little girl nodded and looked down at herself, at the jacket with its row of large buttons that designated her as a Seven.
designated = indicated
From page 40.8  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of designate means:
indicate or signify (show something in a particular way)
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 6, p.40.8
Web Links
disposition
4 uses
1  —4 uses as in:
a kind disposition
Jonas's mother, for example, had higher intelligence than his father; but his father had a calmer disposition.
disposition = normal mood
From page 48.9  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of disposition means:
someone's normal mood, personality, or typical way of behaving
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1, p.7.4
Web Links
distraught
3 uses
I guess I just got distraught, watching them.
distraught = severely worried or dismayed
From page 4.1  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally distraught means:
extremely distressed—typically with worry or grief
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1, p.4.1
Web Links
empower
2 uses
Now, empowered to ask questions of utmost rudeness — and promised answers — he could, conceivably (though it was almost unimaginable), ask someone, some adult, his father perhaps: "Do you lie?"
empowered = given authority or power
From page 71.7  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally empower means:
give or delegate authority or power to

or:

give knowledge or confidence to someone that permits doing something
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 9, p.71.7
Web Links
excruciating
4 uses
Almost instantly the excruciating pain in his hand had diminished to the throb which was, now, all he could recall of the experience.
excruciating = extremely painful
From page 70.1  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally excruciating means:
extremely painful—physically as from a toothache or emotionally as from embarrassment
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 9, p.70.1
Web Links
fleeting
6 uses
It must be a unanimous choice of the Committee. They can have no doubts, however fleeting. If, during the process, an Elder reports a dream of uncertainty, that dream has the power to set a candidate aside instantly.
fleeting = short-lived (lasting just a short time)
From page 62.1  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally fleeting means:
lasting a short time
Word Statistics
Book6 uses
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 8, p.62.1
Web Links
lapse
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
a lapse in judgement
...for each lapse the discipline wand came again, escalating to a series of painful lashes that left marks on Asher's legs. Eventually, for a period of time, Asher stopped talking altogether, when he was a Three. But he learned. ... When he began to talk again, it was with greater precision.
lapse = instance of forgetting to do the right thing
From page 55.6  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of lapse means:
a change in behavior or state—usually undesired such as a temporary failure
The exact meaning of this sense of lapse is often subject to its context:
  • basic example that simply indicates an undesired change in behavior — "lapsed into alcoholism"
  • example indicating that the change was short-term and due to a failure (often of effort or diligence) — "a lapse in judgment"
  • example indicating return to a previous undesired behavior or state — "lapsed into her old bad habits"
  • examples indicating a change in what was occurring where the change is not necessarily negative — "There was a lapse in the conversation," or "She stopped talking as she lapsed into her own internal world."
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 7, p.55.9
Web Links
obsolete
2 uses
Snow made growing food difficult, limited the agricultural periods. ... It wasn't a practical thing, so it became obsolete when we went to Sameness.
obsolete = no longer in use
From page 84.1  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally obsolete means:
no longer in general use because it was replaced by something better
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 11, p.84.1
Web Links
reflect   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 3 uses
1  —1 use as in:
I want to reflect on it.
The evening proceeded as all evenings did in the family unit, in the dwelling, in the community: quiet, reflective, a time for renewal and preparation for the day to come.
reflective = thoughtful

(editor's note:  The suffix "-ive" converts a word into an adjective; though over time, what was originally an adjective often comes to be used as a noun. The adjective pattern means tending to and is seen in words like attractive, impressive, and supportive. Examples of the noun include narrative, alternative, and detective.)
From page 25.9  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of reflect means:
think carefully — possibly aloud or in writing
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library10 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 3, p.25.9
Web Links
2  —2 uses as in:
reflect poorly on the school
But each such error reflected negatively on his parents' guidance and infringed on the community's sense of order and success.
reflected = influenced opinion
From page 45.9  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of reflect means:
influence opinion
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 6, p.45.9
Web Links
successor
5 uses
My job is important and has enormous honor. But that does not mean I am perfect, and when I tried before to train a successor, I failed.
successor = replacement
From page 77  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally successor means:
replacement — typically a person who takes the job of another person, but it can also be a thing that replaces something else
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 8, p.60.9
Web Links
tentative
4 uses
1  —4 uses as in:
said it tentatively
"Sir," Jonas said tentatively, "I would be very interested to hear the story of your life, and to listen to your memories."
tentatively = in a hesitant, unsure manner
From page 77.3  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of tentative means:
done in a careful or unsure way (indicating a lack of confidence in exactly what will happen)
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 10, p.77.3
Web Links
transgress
4 uses
His transgressions were small ones, always: shoes on the wrong feet, schoolwork misplaced, failure to study adequately for a quiz.
transgressions = breaking of rules

(editor's note:  The suffix "-sions", converts a verb into a plural noun that denotes results of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in discussions from discuss, explosions from explode, and revisions from revise.)
From page 45.9  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally transgress means:
to violate a rule, promise, or social norm
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 6, p.45.9
Web Links
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