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Candide

Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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bombastic
1 use
they do not know how to speak to men, with false maxims, with bombastic commonplaces!
bombastic = pompous or pretentious
DefinitionGenerally bombastic means:
pompous or pretentious talk or writing

(often using difficult words in an attempt to make something sound more important than it is or to make the speaker sound more intelligent)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 22
Web Links
Constantinople
13 uses
Candide's Voyage to Constantinople
Constantinople = The city of Byzantium was renamed this prior to being named Istanbul.
DefinitionGenerally Constantinople means:
the city of Byzantium was renamed to Constantinople which was renamed to Istanbul, Turkey; Constantine made it the capital of the Byzantium Empire (also known as the eastern Roman Empire) in the fourth century
Word Statistics
Book13 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 12
Web Links
denounce
1 use
the ladies had denounced them
denounced = turned them into the authorities as criminals
DefinitionGenerally denounce means:
to strongly criticize or accuse publicly

or more rarely:  to inform against someone (turn someone into the authorities)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 16
Web Links
effrontery
1 use
I find thou hast the most consummate effrontery to dare to mention so presumptuous a design!
effrontery = impolite boldness

(editor's note:  In this context, consummate means complete or utter.)
DefinitionGenerally effrontery means:
rude and disrespectful behavior — often made by someone who does not realize they are being rude — as when someone is presumptuous or impolitely bold
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 15
Web Links
heresy
1 use
My dear, how could you take it into your head to dissect a heretic?
heretic = someone with opinions or actions most people consider immoral
DefinitionGenerally heresy means:
opinions or actions most people consider immoral
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 28
Web Links
incessant
1 use
the fountains of spring water ... incessantly flowing into the great squares,
incessantly = continuously
DefinitionGenerally incessant means:
continuous — often in an annoying way
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 18
Web Links
ingenious
1 use
Their departure, with the ingenious manner in which they and their sheep were hoisted over the mountains, was a splendid spectacle.
ingenious = inventive and skillful
DefinitionGenerally ingenious means:
showing cleverness and originality
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 18
Web Links
innate
1 use
he is a man that does not believe in innate ideas
innate = present at birth or existing as an inseparable part of being human
DefinitionGenerally innate means:
of a quality:  present at birth; or arising from within rather than having been learned or acquired
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 22
Web Links
inquisitor
22 uses
The Inquisitor threatened him
inquisitor = an officer of the Inquisition (who could question and punish people thought to be heretical or immoral)
DefinitionGenerally inquisitor means:
a questioner who is excessively harsh

or:

an officer of the Inquisition
Word Statistics
Book22 uses
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 10
Web Links
intractable
1 use
In order to render me more tractable, he brought me to this country house.
tractable = easily managed
DefinitionGenerally intractable means:
difficult
in various senses, including:
  • of problems or disease — difficult to solve or cure
  • of people or animals — difficult to manage or control
  • of materials — difficult to manipulate
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 8
Web Links
languish
1 use
I sometimes make my Parisian lovers languish for fifteen days, but I give myself to you the first night because one must do the honours of one's country to a young man from Westphalia.
languish = to suffer in a bad situation for a long time
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 22
Web Links
lethargic
1 use
This discourse gave rise to new reflections, and Martin especially concluded that man was born to live either in a state of distracting inquietude or of lethargic disgust.
lethargic = lacking energy

(editor's note:  inquietude is a synonym for unrest or anxiety.)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 30
Web Links
officious
1 use
...one of those busybodies who are ever alert, officious, forward, fawning, and complaisant; who watch for strangers in their passage through the capital, tell them the scandalous history of the town, and offer them pleasure at all prices.
officious = too eager to offer advice, opinions, or help
DefinitionGenerally officious means:
too eager to tell others what to do — often regarding unimportant matters
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 22
Web Links
precipitate
1 use
1  —1 use
(adj) as in: a precipitate decision
They did not know whether they were cries of pain or joy; but they started up precipitately with that inquietude and alarm which every little thing inspires in an unknown country.
precipitately = with great haste
DefinitionGenerally this sense of precipitate means:
acting with great haste — often without adequate thought
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 16
Web Links
prodigal
1 use
He can afford to be witty ... prodigally, without saving, because he knows there is more wit where that came from.
prodigally = extravagantly (or wastefully)
DefinitionGenerally prodigal means:
recklessly wasteful

or more rarely:

abundant (extravagant in amount)

or more rarely still:

long absent (someone who has been away a long time)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useIntr.
Web Links
satiate
1 use
I am so satiated with the great number of detestable books with which we are inundated that I am reduced to punting at faro.
satiated = filled to satisfaction

(editor's note:  "Punting at faro" refers to betting on a particular type of card game.)
DefinitionGenerally satiate means:
to satisfy a hunger; or fill to satisfaction (typically said of hunger for food, but can be said of anything desired—such as of knowledge or sensual pleasure)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 22
Web Links
squander
1 use
They had soon squandered their three thousand piastres,
squandered = wasted
DefinitionGenerally squander means:
to waste — money, resources, or opportunities
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 30
Web Links
vivacious
1 use
...the youth as innocently kissed the young lady's hand with particular vivacity, sensibility, and grace;
vivacity = engaging liveliness
DefinitionGenerally vivacious means:
having an engaging liveliness — when said of a person, typically said of a female
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
whimsical
1 use
This obscure, whimsical, and disagreeable poem was despised
whimsical = playfully written based on impulse rather than by necessity or reason
DefinitionGenerally whimsical means:
playful, amusing, or impulsive rather than seriously rational
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 25
Web Links
zeal
1 use
to what excess does religious zeal carry the ladies.
zeal = enthusiasm
DefinitionGenerally zeal means:
active interest and enthusiasm
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3
Web Links
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