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The Brothers Karamazov

Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

instructions
aesthetic
2 uses
You are wounded, in the first place, in your esthetic feelings, and, secondly, in your pride.
esthetic = sense of what is good or beautiful
DefinitionGenerally aesthetic means:
related to beauty or good taste — often referring to one's appreciation of beauty or one's sense of what is beautiful

or:

beautiful or tasteful
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
amorous
1 use
It was merely stated that the criminal, whose approaching trial was making such a sensation—retired army captain, an idle swaggerer, and reactionary bully—was continually involved in amorous intrigues, and particularly popular with certain ladies "who were pining in solitude."
amorous = romantic or sexual
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 11
Web Links
benevolent
5 uses
Miuesov passed immediately from the most benevolent frame of mind to the most savage.
benevolent = kind
DefinitionGenerally benevolent means:
kind, generous, or charitable
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 5
Web Links
candid
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
your candid opinion
They were splendid children ... "and I can't look at their innocent candid faces, I am unworthy."
candid = honest and straightforward
DefinitionGenerally this sense of candid means:
honest and direct
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 6
Web Links
censure
4 uses
they would censure me, and I would burst out laughing in their faces.
censure = criticize
DefinitionGenerally censure means:
harsh criticism; or formal criticism from an organization — such as the U.S. Senate
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 7
Web Links
complacent
5 uses
"Don't be anxious about my nature," Kolya interrupted, not without complacency.
complacency = a lack of concern — often to a fault
DefinitionGenerally complacent means:
contented (unworried and satisfied) — often to a fault
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
credulous
3 uses
Oh, in such cases the criminal is often amazingly shallow and credulous.
credulous = gullible (being too willing to believe)
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
defer
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
deferred to her wishes
...he dare not defer it for a moment,
defer = postpone (put off)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of defer means:
submit or yield (typically to another person's opinion because of respect for that person or their knowledge)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
depravity
5 uses
His depravity with women was not simply what it used to be, but even more revolting.
depravity = immorality or evilness
DefinitionGenerally depravity means:
complete immorality or evilness
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
deride
4 uses
And therefore the idea of the service of humanity, of brotherly love and the solidarity of mankind, is more and more dying out in the world, and indeed this idea is sometimes treated with derision.
derision = treatment as though it is unworthy of respect

(editor's note:  The suffix "-sion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in admission from admit, discussion from discuss, and invasion from invade.)
DefinitionGenerally deride means:
to criticize with strong disrespect — often
with humor
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
discord
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
discord amongst the group
...he was always pondering in his mind how the family discord could be ended.
discord = conflict or disagreement — especially among those expected to cooperate
DefinitionGenerally this sense of discord means:
conflict or disagreement — especially among those expected to cooperate

or (especially in the form discordant):

seeming different  or wrong along with everything else
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
disparage
1 use
he could do no real good by such disparagement of the witnesses,
disparagement = criticizing
DefinitionGenerally disparage means:
to criticize or make seem less important — especially in a disrespectful or contemptuous manner
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 12
Web Links
dissent
3 uses
instead of serving the cause of brotherly love and the union of humanity have fallen, on the contrary, into dissension and isolation
dissension = disagreement

(editor's note:  The suffix "-sion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in admission from admit, discussion from discuss, and invasion from invade.)
DefinitionGenerally dissent means:
to disagree; or disagreement or conflict — typically between people who cooperate, and often with official or majority beliefs
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
efface
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
efface the memory
But my answer to that is, that, if he was planning such a murder in accordance with his letter, he certainly would not have quarreled even with a shopman, and probably would not have gone into the tavern at all, because a person plotting such a crime seeks quiet and retirement, seeks to efface himself, to avoid being seen and heard, and that not from calculation, but from instinct.†
efface = make himself inconspicuous or unimportant
DefinitionGenerally this sense of efface means:
remove completely from recognition or memory — sometimes by erasing
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 12
Web Links
nominal
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
he's nominally in charge
It was not that she lent money on interest, but it was known, for instance, that she had for some time past, in partnership with old Karamazov, actually invested in the purchase of bad debts for a trifle, a tenth of their nominal value, and afterwards had made out of them ten times their value.†
nominal = face (the amount of the debt, but not its value at the time of the investment)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of nominal means:
in form or name, but not in reality
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 7
Web Links
pedantic
3 uses
"That's all pedantry and innovation, no use listening to it," the monks decided.
pedantry = too much concern for formal rules, details, or book learning
DefinitionGenerally pedantic means:
too concerned with formal rules, details, or book learning
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
refute
3 uses
he scarcely tried to refute his evidence
refute = argue against
DefinitionGenerally refute means:
to disprove or argue against
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 12
Web Links
repudiate
4 uses
we shall hasten to repudiate it.
repudiate = reject
DefinitionGenerally repudiate means:
strong rejection — especially when the idea or thing being rejected was once embraced
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 12
Web Links
scrupulous
5 uses
scrupulous in the performance of his duties
scrupulous = diligent and careful
DefinitionGenerally scrupulous means:
careful to behave ethically and/or diligently (with great care and attention to detail)
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
simile
1 use
  "...all the peoples of the world stand aside respectfully to make way for the recklessly galloping troika to pass."
  .... The liberal significance of this simile was appreciated.
simile = a phrase that highlights similarity between things of different kinds
DefinitionGenerally simile means:
a phrase that highlights similarity between things of different kinds — usually formed with "like" or "as"

as in "It's like looking for a needle in a haystack," or "She is as quiet as a mouse."
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 12
Web Links
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Sample usage followed by this mark was not checked by an editor. Please let us know if you spot a problem.
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