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The Brothers Karamazov

Extra Credit Words with Typical Sample Sentences

instructions
aesthetic
2 uses
It was not aesthetically pleasing.
aesthetically = related to beauty or good taste
DefinitionGenerally aesthetic means:
related to beauty or good taste — often referring to one's appreciation of beauty or one's sense of what is beautiful

or:

beautiful or tasteful
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
amorous
1 use
She rejected his amorous advances.
amorous = romantic or sexual
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 11
Web Links
benevolent
5 uses
They called themselves The Benevolent Association because their mission was to help others.
benevolent = kind, generous, or charitable
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 5
Web Links
candid
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
your candid opinion
Don't worry about my feelings. I'd like your candid opinion.
candid = honest and direct
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 6
Web Links
censure
4 uses
They censured him for bringing dishonor upon the Senate.
censured = formally criticized
DefinitionGenerally censure means:
harsh criticism; or formal criticism from an organization — such as the U.S. Senate
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 7
Web Links
complacent
5 uses
She had become complacent after years of success.
complacent = unworried and satisfied
DefinitionGenerally complacent means:
contented (unworried and satisfied) — often to a fault
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
credulous
3 uses
The trick would fool none but the most credulous.
credulous = gullible (being too willing to believe)
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
defer
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
deferred to her wishes
I defer to her expertise.
defer = submit
DefinitionGenerally this sense of defer means:
submit or yield (typically to another person's opinion because of respect for that person or their knowledge)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
depravity
5 uses
It is a terrible story of an innocent who trusted a man who treated her with ruthless depravity.
depravity = immorality or evilness
DefinitionGenerally depravity means:
complete immorality or evilness
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
deride
4 uses
She relentlessly mocks and derides the younger students.
derides = criticizes with strong disrespect
DefinitionGenerally deride means:
to criticize with strong disrespect — often
with humor
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
discord
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
discord amongst the group
There is too much discord in the team.
discord = conflict
DefinitionGenerally this sense of discord means:
conflict or disagreement — especially among those expected to cooperate

or (especially in the form discordant):

seeming different  or wrong along with everything else
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
disparage
1 use
She has a reputation for disparaging the efforts of her co-workers.
disparaging = criticizing or making seem less important
DefinitionGenerally disparage means:
to criticize or make seem less important — especially in a disrespectful or contemptuous manner
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 12
Web Links
dissent
3 uses
The Alien and Sedition Acts were attempts to silence early political dissent in America.
dissent = disagreement
DefinitionGenerally dissent means:
to disagree; or disagreement or conflict — typically between people who cooperate, and often with official or majority beliefs
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
efface
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
efface the memory
It is a shameful act I have never been able to efface or forget.
efface = remove completely
DefinitionGenerally this sense of efface means:
remove completely from recognition or memory — sometimes by erasing
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 12
Web Links
nominal
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
he's nominally in charge
It was nominally written by the artist, but everyone suspects a ghostwriter did the bulk of the work.
nominally = in name only
DefinitionGenerally this sense of nominal means:
in form or name, but not in reality
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 7
Web Links
pedantic
3 uses
Her lectures were too pedantic for my taste.
pedantic = overly concerned with book learning
DefinitionGenerally pedantic means:
too concerned with formal rules, details, or book learning
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
refute
3 uses
The speaker refuted his opponent's arguments.
refuted = argued against
DefinitionGenerally refute means:
to disprove or argue against
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 12
Web Links
repudiate
4 uses
The parents repudiated their son.
repudiated = strongly rejected
DefinitionGenerally repudiate means:
strong rejection — especially when the idea or thing being rejected was once embraced
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 12
Web Links
scrupulous
5 uses
You can count on her. She is scrupulous in her work.
scrupulous = careful and thorough
DefinitionGenerally scrupulous means:
careful to behave ethically and/or diligently (with great care and attention to detail)
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
simile
1 use
When she said he was "as subtle as a sledgehammer," she was using ironic simile.
simile = a phrase that highlights similarity between things of different kinds
DefinitionGenerally simile means:
a phrase that highlights similarity between things of different kinds — usually formed with "like" or "as"

as in "It's like looking for a needle in a haystack," or "She is as quiet as a mouse."
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 12
Web Links
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