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The Awakening

Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

instructions
alacrity
2 uses
Victor Lebrun ... accepted with alacrity.
alacrity = eagerness
DefinitionGenerally alacrity means:
quickness; and/or cheerful eagerness
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 18
Web Links
comprehend
14 uses
I only half comprehend her.
comprehend = completely understand
DefinitionGenerally comprehend means:
to understand something — especially to understand it completely
Word Statistics
Book14 uses
Library20 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
discern
2 uses
He and his wife spoke English with an accent which was only discernible through its un-English emphasis and a certain carefulness and deliberation.
discernible = noticeable
DefinitionGenerally discern means:
to notice or understand something — often something that is not obvious
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 18
Web Links
dissent
2 uses
Robert proposed it, and there was not a dissenting voice.
dissenting = disagreeing
DefinitionGenerally dissent means:
to disagree; or disagreement or conflict — typically between people who cooperate, and often with official or majority beliefs
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 10
Web Links
efface
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
efface herself
They were women who idolized their children, worshiped their husbands, and esteemed it a holy privilege to efface themselves as individuals and grow wings as ministering angels.
efface = make themselves inconspicuous or unimportant
DefinitionGenerally this sense of efface means:
to make oneself inconspicuous or unimportant
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
effrontery
1 use
He stood close to her, and the effrontery in his eyes repelled the old, vanishing self in her, yet drew all her awakening sensuousness.
effrontery = impolite boldness
DefinitionGenerally effrontery means:
rude and disrespectful behavior — often made by someone who does not realize they are being rude — as when someone is presumptuous or impolitely bold
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 25
Web Links
expedient
1 use
She was visited by no more outbursts, moving her to such futile expedients.
expedients = actions that are speedy or practical
DefinitionGenerally expedient means:
a practical action — especially one that accepts negative tradeoffs due to circumstances

or:

convenient, speedy, or practical
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 19
Web Links
futile
2 uses
Robert had pursued a system of lessons almost daily; and he was nearly at the point of discouragement in realizing the futility of his efforts.
futility = pointlessness (uselessness)
DefinitionGenerally futile means:
effort that is pointless because it is unproductive or unsuccessful
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 10
Web Links
immutable
1 use
Victor Lebrun objected; and his decrees were as immutable as those of Fate.
immutable = unchangeable
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 9
Web Links
impervious
1 use
But she did not want to appear unamiable and uninterested, so she had brought forth newspapers, which she spread upon the floor of the gallery, and under Madame Ratignolle's directions she had cut a pattern of the impervious garment.
impervious = not admitting passage through (in this case, not permitting cold to penetrate)
DefinitionGenerally impervious means:
not admitting passage through; or not capable of being affected
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
indifferent
12 uses
you have made me so unhappy with your indifference.
indifference = lack of interest
DefinitionGenerally indifferent means:
without interest
in various senses, including:
  • unconcerned — as in "She is indifferent to what is served to eat."
  • unsympathetic — as in "She is indifferent to his needs."
  • not of good quality (which may imply average or poor quality depending upon context) — as in "an indifferent performance"
  • impartial — as in "We need a judge who is indifferent."
Word Statistics
Book12 uses
Library15 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 17
Web Links
insidious
1 use
They were designed for winter wear, when treacherous drafts came down chimneys and insidious currents of deadly cold found their way through key-holes.
insidious = treacherous
DefinitionGenerally insidious means:
not appearing dangerous, but actually very harmful over time

or:

treacherous  (dangerous due to trickery or from hidden or unpredictable risks)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
languish
2 uses
If he had expected to find her languishing ... he must have been greatly surprised.
languishing = suffering in a bad situation for a long time
DefinitionGenerally languish means:
to suffer in a bad situation for a long time
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 29
Web Links
latent
1 use
He had detected the latent sensuality, which unfolded under his delicate sense of her nature's requirements like a torpid, torrid, sensitive blossom.
latent = potentially existing but not presently evident or active
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 35
Web Links
poignant
2 uses
...with its soulful and poignant longing.
poignant = intense
DefinitionGenerally poignant means:
sharp or intense — typically arousing deep emotion such as sadness, but possibly having or creating a sharp smell, taste, or insight
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 15
Web Links
remonstrate
2 uses
he immediately wrote her a letter of unqualified disapproval and remonstrance.
remonstrance = argument in protest or opposition
DefinitionGenerally remonstrate means:
argue, complain, or criticize
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 32
Web Links
supercilious
1 use
She was not a supercilious or an over-dainty woman.
supercilious = arrogant
DefinitionGenerally supercilious means:
arrogant (acting as if better, more important, and superior in ideas than others)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 10
Web Links
torpid
1 use
He had detected the latent sensuality, which unfolded under his delicate sense of her nature's requirements like a torpid, torrid, sensitive blossom.
torpid = slow
DefinitionGenerally torpid means:
of people:  slow or inactive — usually resulting from a lack of energy and interest

or:

of animals:  a condition of biological rest or suspended animation — (could be in the evening, during the cold, or as in a hibernated or dormant state all winter)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 35
Web Links
vivacious
2 uses
There were Mr. and Mrs. Merriman, a pretty, vivacious little woman in the thirties; her husband, a jovial fellow, something of a shallow-pate, who laughed a good deal at other people's witticisms, and had thereby made himself extremely popular.
vivacious = with engaging liveliness
DefinitionGenerally vivacious means:
having an engaging liveliness — when said of a person, typically said of a female
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 30
Web Links
whimsical
2 uses
remembering Edna's whimsical turn of mind of late
whimsical = impulsive
DefinitionGenerally whimsical means:
playful, amusing, or impulsive rather than seriously rational
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 22
Web Links
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