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Atlas Shrugged

Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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aesthetic
3 uses
...he felt was the sheer pleasure of the sight, the purest esthetic pleasure he had ever experienced.
esthetic = sensation of beauty
DefinitionGenerally aesthetic means:
related to beauty or good taste — often referring to one's appreciation of beauty or one's sense of what is beautiful

or:

beautiful or tasteful
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 1.7
Web Links
arbitrary
17 uses
Now I saw that one man was to be bound by it, but the other was not, one was to obey a rule, the other was to assert an arbitrary wish-his need-and the law was to stand on the side of the wish.
arbitrary = unfair (based on chance or impulse rather than fair reasoning)
DefinitionGenerally arbitrary means:
based on chance or impulse (rather than upon reasoning, consistent rules, or a proper sense of fairness)
Word Statistics
Book17 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 3.7
Web Links
austere
25 uses
His face was hard; it had an expression of severity, an inner severity directed at himself; it looked austere and lonely.
austere = without comfort or luxury
DefinitionGenerally austere means:
a notable absence of luxury, comfort, or decoration

or:

of a person:  stern in manner; or practicing great self-denial
Word Statistics
Book25 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 2.2
Web Links
belligerent
12 uses
...in the belligerently righteous style of a third-rate tabloid; her economics consisted of the assertion that "we've got to help the poor."
belligerently = with a manner of one eager to fight
DefinitionGenerally belligerent means:
hostile (the attitude of one eager to fight); or one already engaged in a fight or war
Word Statistics
Book12 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.6
Web Links
benevolent
7 uses
Entering Rearden's office, Dr. Floyd Ferris wore the expression of a man so certain of the success of his quest that he could afford a benevolent smile.
benevolent = kind and generous
DefinitionGenerally benevolent means:
kind, generous, or charitable
Word Statistics
Book7 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 1.8
Web Links
blatant
4 uses
For instance, if you have been avoiding me so blatantly for months, wouldn't I want to know the reason?
blatantly = obviously
DefinitionGenerally blatant means:
obvious — often without any attempt to hide bad behavior
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.5
Web Links
credulous
5 uses
this task of pretending, distorting, deceiving, with the credulous stare of...
credulous = gullible (being too willing to believe)
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3.8
Web Links
denounce
21 uses
Mr. Rearden, the law which you are denouncing is based on the highest principle-the principle of the public good.
denouncing = strongly criticizing or accusing publicly

or more rarely:  informing against someone
DefinitionGenerally denounce means:
to strongly criticize or accuse publicly

or more rarely:  to inform against someone (turn someone into the authorities)
Word Statistics
Book21 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.5
Web Links
deride
11 uses
She was startled to see him looking at her with a touch of derision, as if he were mocking her estimate...
derision = contempt and ridicule (lack of respect and making fun of)

(editor's note:  The suffix "-sion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in admission from admit, discussion from discuss, and invasion from invade.)
DefinitionGenerally deride means:
to criticize with strong disrespect — often
with humor
Word Statistics
Book11 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.5
Web Links
dispose
3 uses
1  —3 uses as in:
disposed the troops along...
"My dear, I'm at your disposal, I'd do anything to help you," he answered, the rules of their language requiring that any open statement be answered by a blatant lie.†
disposal = command

(editor's note:  When something is "at someone's disposal" it is "at their command," or "available for their use." They can use it as they please.)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of dispose means:
the arrangement, positioning, or use of things
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 3.1
Web Links
dogmatic
1 use
We're not stubborn, theoretical dogmatists-we're flexible.
dogmatists = people who state their opinions as absolute truth
DefinitionGenerally dogmatic means:
prone to stating opinions as absolute truth
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3.8
Web Links
expedient
6 uses
-that we must act on the expediency of the moment-you don't want to risk your job, do you?
expediency = an action that is speedy or practical
DefinitionGenerally expedient means:
a practical action — especially one that accepts negative tradeoffs due to circumstances

or:

convenient, speedy, or practical
Word Statistics
Book6 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.7
Web Links
fastidious
4 uses
She stood there, fastidiously groomed, wearing a...
fastidiously = giving careful attention to detail
DefinitionGenerally fastidious means:
giving careful attention to detail

or:

excessively concerned with cleanliness or matters of taste
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.2
Web Links
ostentatious
11 uses
But tonight she wore an ostentatious display:
ostentatious = intended to attract notice and impress others
DefinitionGenerally ostentatious means:
intended to attract notice and impress others — especially with wealth in a vulgar way
Word Statistics
Book11 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.2
Web Links
perspective   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 2 uses
1  —1 use as in:
Look at it from her perspective
Then, as if a single, sudden blow to his brain blasted a moment's shift of perspective, he felt an immense astonishment at what he was doing here and why.†
perspective = way of seeing and thinking about things
DefinitionGenerally this sense of perspective means:
a particular way of seeing or thinking about things
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 2.2
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
a perspective of the entire block
Rearden stood at the window of his office, his hand pressed to the pane; in the perspective of distance, his hand covered half a mile of structures, as if he were trying to hold them.†
perspective = view (appearance from where looking)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of perspective means:
a view — often stressing that the view is different from a view from another location
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2.3
Web Links
refute
4 uses
They neither refuted nor agreed; they merely looked as if her arguments were beside the point.
refuted = argued against
DefinitionGenerally refute means:
to disprove or argue against
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 1.7
Web Links
reprehensible
1 use
They're all scrambling to get statements into the newspapers to the effect that they have no connection whatever with the John Galt Line and how reprehensible an undertaking they think it is.
reprehensible = bad and unacceptable
DefinitionGenerally reprehensible means:
bad — deserving severe criticism
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.7
Web Links
scrupulous
7 uses
Eddie's eyes were blue, wide and questioning; he had blond hair and a square face, unremarkable except for that look of scrupulous attentiveness and...
scrupulous = diligent and ethical
DefinitionGenerally scrupulous means:
careful to behave ethically and/or diligently (with great care and attention to detail)
Word Statistics
Book7 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 1.1
Web Links
succession
5 uses
1  —5 uses as in:
a succession of events
It was a succession of minutes, but it hit them as a single whole.
succession = series (one after another)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of succession means:
series or sequence (one after another)
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1.8
Web Links
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Sample usage followed by this mark was not checked by an editor. Please let us know if you spot a problem.
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