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Babbitt

Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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aesthetic
1 use
He knew himself to be of a breeding altogether more esthetic and sensitive than Thompson's. He was a college graduate, he played golf, he often smoked cigarettes instead of cigars, and when he went to Chicago he took a room with a private bath.
esthetic = beautiful, tasteful, or related to beauty or taste
DefinitionGenerally aesthetic means:
related to beauty or good taste — often referring to one's appreciation of beauty or one's sense of what is beautiful

or:

beautiful or tasteful
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 6
Web Links
apathy
1 use
He accepted Frink with vast apathy; he grunted, "Poor boob!"
apathy = lack of interest and enthusiasm
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 23
Web Links
arbitration
1 use
For two weeks they studied, debated, and arbitrated the list of guests.
arbitrated = decided
DefinitionGenerally arbitration means:
the process of solving a disagreement with the help of an impartial referee
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 8
Web Links
censure
2 uses
If he took her to dinner, if he were seen by censorious friends—But he went on ardently:
censorious = tending to express harsh criticism
DefinitionGenerally censure means:
harsh criticism; or formal criticism from an organization — such as the U.S. Senate
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 24
Web Links
complacent
2 uses
In contrast to the complacent Myra he saw her as swift and air-borne and radiant, a fire-spirit tenderly stooping to the hearth
complacent = contented (satisfied and unworried)
DefinitionGenerally complacent means:
contented (unworried and satisfied) — often to a fault
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
compulsion
3 uses
He felt a compulsion back to all the standards he had so vaguely yet so desperately been fleeing.
compulsion = a strong (possibly uncontrollable) urge to do something
DefinitionGenerally compulsion means:
a strong (possibly uncontrollable) urge to do something; or force or a requirement that forces an action
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 29
Web Links
contempt
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
feels contempt towards her
He was dismayed by a sudden contempt for his surest friends.
contempt = lack of respect
DefinitionGenerally this sense of contempt means:
lack of respect — often accompanied by a feeling of intense dislike or disgust
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library11 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 9
Web Links
credulous
5 uses
He who had been a boy very credulous of life was no longer greatly interested in the possible and improbable adventures of each new day.
credulous = gullible (being too willing to believe)
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
deride
2 uses
Under this derision Babbitt became more matter-of-fact.
derision = critical disrespect — typically while laughing at or making fun of

(editor's note:  The suffix "-sion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in admission from admit, discussion from discuss, and invasion from invade.)
DefinitionGenerally deride means:
to criticize with strong disrespect — often
with humor
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 33
Web Links
diligent
4 uses
You remember that in the Bible about—about being diligent in the Lord's business, or something?
diligent = hard work and care
DefinitionGenerally diligent means:
hard work and care in tasks — often continuing when others might quit because of difficulties
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 3
Web Links
eccentric
2 uses
His daughter Verona eccentrically took baths in the morning, now and then.
eccentrically = unconventional or strange; or a person with such traits
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
hackneyed
1 use
The men leaned back on their heels, put their hands in their trousers-pockets, and proclaimed their views with the booming profundity of a prosperous male repeating a thoroughly hackneyed statement about a matter of which he knows nothing whatever.
hackneyed = writing that befits a hack writer; i.e., writing that is unimaginative and filled with overused expressions, ideas, and formulas
DefinitionGenerally hackneyed means:
lacking impact due to too much previous exposure — especially writing that is unimaginative and filled with overused expressions, ideas, and formulas
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 8
Web Links
incredulous
4 uses
Babbitt incredulously saw that it was Chum Frink.
incredulously = with disbelief
DefinitionGenerally incredulous means:
unbelieving; or having difficulty accepting something so unexpected
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library11 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 20
Web Links
indolent
1 use
If people had ever lived and loved here, read thrillers at midnight and lain in beautiful indolence on a Sunday morning, there were no signs of it.
indolence = laziness
DefinitionGenerally this sense of indolent means:
lazy; disinclined to work
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
inevitable
4 uses
At dinner, when his wife began the inevitable, he bellowed, "I forbid any of you to say a word about Paul!"
inevitable = certain to happen
DefinitionGenerally inevitable means:
certain to happen (even if one tried to prevent it)
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library23 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
notorious
5 uses
From newspaper pictures he knew that the speaker must be the notorious freelance preacher, Beecher Ingram, of whom Seneca Doane had spoken.
notorious = well known for something bad
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 7
Web Links
revere
13 uses
she did her work with the thoroughness of a mind which reveres details and never quite understands them;
reveres = respects and admires
DefinitionGenerally revere means:
regard with feelings of deep respect and admiration — sometimes with a mixture of wonder and awe or fear
Word Statistics
Book13 uses
Library12 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 10
Web Links
scrupulous
1 use
He performed the rite scrupulously.
scrupulously = diligently or carefully
DefinitionGenerally scrupulous means:
careful to behave ethically and/or diligently (with great care and attention to detail)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 12
Web Links
stoic
1 use
Every truck that made its way from the factories to the freight-stations was guarded by a policeman, trying to look stoical beside the scab driver.
stoical = not showing emotion
DefinitionGenerally stoic means:
seeming unaffected by pleasure, pain, or emotions
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 27
Web Links
zeal
2 uses
They spoke with zeal of the coming baseball season.
zeal = active interest and enthusiasm
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 13
Web Links
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