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Anne Of Green Gables

Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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aesthetic
1 use
"Messy things," said Marilla, whose aesthetic sense was not noticeably developed.
aesthetic = appreciation of beauty
DefinitionGenerally aesthetic means:
related to beauty or good taste — often referring to one's appreciation of beauty or one's sense of what is beautiful

or:

beautiful or tasteful
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 16
Web Links
amiable
4 uses
"You'd think I ought to let Anne go to the moon if she took the notion, I've no doubt" was Marilla's amiable rejoinder.
amiable = friendly, agreeable, and likable

(editor's note:  rejoinder is a synonym for reply.)
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 9
Web Links
benevolent
1 use
she came to the door with surprise and welcome mingled on her benevolent face.
benevolent = kind
DefinitionGenerally benevolent means:
kind, generous, or charitable
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 6
Web Links
bronze   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 3 uses
1  —1 use as in:
bronze won't corrode in salt water
The bronze medal for mathematics was considered as good as won by a fat, funny little up-country boy with a bumpy forehead and a patched coat.
bronze = made of a brownish metal
DefinitionGenerally this sense of bronze means:
a brownish-colored metal with red or yellow hues that is made of copper and (usually) tin
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 35
Web Links
2  —2 uses as in:
a bronze tan
OCTOBER was a beautiful month at Green Gables, when the birches in the hollow turned as golden as sunshine and the maples behind the orchard were royal crimson and the wild cherry trees along the lane put on the loveliest shades of dark red and bronzy green, while the fields sunned themselves in aftermaths.†
bronzy = reddish brown
DefinitionGenerally this sense of bronze means:
a reddish-brown or yellowish-brown color like that of one of the metals with the same name — often used to refer to a suntan or a dark glowing complexion
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 16
Web Links
candid
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
your candid opinion
"I'm willing to own up that I made a mistake," she concluded candidly, "but I've learned a lesson."
candidly = with honesty and directness
DefinitionGenerally this sense of candid means:
honest and direct
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 14
Web Links
conjugate
1 use
That, she felt, would be a sweet reward indeed for all her hard work and patient grubbing among unimaginative equations and conjugations.
conjugations = grammatical changes of verb forms to match context

(editor's note:  The suffix "-tions", converts a verb into a plural noun that denotes results of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in actions, illustrations, and observations.)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of conjugate means:
grammatical changes of verb forms to agree with other words in a sentence for tense, number, person, and other things

English tense example:
    She writes.
    She is writing.
    She will write tomorrow.
    She has written in the past.
  
English number example:
      Jane is...
      Jane and Susan are...
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 32
Web Links
contempt
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
feels contempt towards her
Mrs. Rachel was not often sick and had a well-defined contempt for people who were;
contempt = disrespect
DefinitionGenerally this sense of contempt means:
lack of respect for someone or something thought inferior — often accompanied by a feeling of dislike or disgust
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 25
Web Links
convoluted
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
convoluted folds of the brain
The door was open behind them, held back by a big pink conch shell with hints of sea sunsets in its smooth inner convolutions.
convolutions = twists and folds

(editor's note:  The suffix "-tions", converts a verb into a plural noun that denotes results of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in actions, illustrations, and observations.)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of convoluted means:
having complex coils, folds, twists, or irregularities
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 37
Web Links
descend
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
thieves descended upon us
A blight seemed to have descended on her.
descended = come
DefinitionGenerally this sense of descend means:
to come or arrive — especially suddenly or from above or as an attack
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 6
Web Links
diligent
2 uses
Miss Stacy says you are bright and diligent.
diligent = hard-working and careful to get things right
DefinitionGenerally this sense of diligent means:
hard work and care in tasks — often continuing when others might quit because of difficulties
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 8
Web Links
disdain
3 uses
"Ruby Gillis thinks of nothing but beaus," said Anne disdainfully.
disdainfully = with a lack of respect

(editor's note:  beaus means boyfriends)
DefinitionGenerally disdain means:
a lack of respect — often suggesting distaste and an undeserved sense of superiority

or:

to reject as not good enough
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 15
Web Links
dubious
4 uses
Marilla was not to be drawn from the safe concrete into dubious paths of the abstract.
dubious = doubtful (not to be relied upon)
DefinitionGenerally dubious means:
doubtful
in various senses, including:
  • doubtful that something should be relied upon — as in "The argument relies on a dubious assumption."
  • doubtful that something is morally proper — as in "The company is accused of using dubious sales practices to influence minors."
  • bad or of questionable value — as in "The state has the dubious distinction of the highest taxes."
  • doubtful or uncertain — as in "She is dubious about making the change."
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 26
Web Links
nominal
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
he's nominally in charge
"I think he has only been its nominal head for many years," said Anne.†
nominal = in name
DefinitionGenerally this sense of nominal means:
in form or name, but not in reality
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 36
Web Links
obstinate
3 uses
There is nothing more to do except to pray and I haven't much hope that that'll do much good because, Marilla, I do not believe that God Himself can do very much with such an obstinate person as Mrs. Barry.
obstinate = stubbornly unyielding to other's wishes
DefinitionGenerally obstinate means:
stubbornly not doing what others want
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 15
Web Links
predilection
1 use
Marilla's astonishment could not have been greater if Matthew had expressed a predilection for standing on his head.
predilection = preference or tendency
DefinitionGenerally predilection means:
preference (a predisposition in favor of something); or tendency (normal behavior)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3
Web Links
reprehensible
1 use
She was as angry with herself as with Anne, because, whenever she recalled Mrs. Rachel's dumbfounded countenance her lips twitched with amusement and she felt a most reprehensible desire to laugh.
reprehensible = bad
DefinitionGenerally reprehensible means:
bad — deserving severe criticism
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 9
Web Links
resolute
9 uses
"You mustn't sell Green Gables," said Anne resolutely.
resolutely = with firm purpose or belief
DefinitionGenerally resolute means:
firm in purpose or belief
Word Statistics
Book9 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3
Web Links
succession
3 uses
1  —3 uses as in:
a succession of events
I like babies in moderation, but twins three times in succession is TOO MUCH.
succession = a row (one after another)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of succession means:
series or sequence (one after another)
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 5
Web Links
superfluous
1 use
She knew Mrs. Peter Blewett only by sight as a small, shrewish-faced woman without an ounce of superfluous flesh on her bones.
superfluous = more than is needed
DefinitionGenerally superfluous means:
more than is needed, desired, or required
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 6
Web Links
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Sample usage followed by this mark was not checked by an editor. Please let us know if you spot a problem.
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