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And Then There Were None
Vocabulary

Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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abstract
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
abstract thought
We knew Blore-and he was not the man that you'd ever accuse of a desire for abstract justice.
abstract = of a concept not associated with any specific instance
DefinitionGenerally this sense of abstract means:
of a concept or idea not associated with any specific instance

or more rarely:

describing someone as distracted — thinking about something outside of the immediate conversation or circumstances
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 16
Web Links
aversion
1 use
She had avoided Emily Brent with a kind of shuddering aversion.
aversion = dislike that leads to avoidance
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 8
Web Links
bound   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 4 uses
1  —3 uses as in:
She's bound to succeed.
Armstrong said: "I thought he was following me.... Of course, he'd be bound to go slower than we did."
bound = almost certain
DefinitionGenerally this sense of bound means:
almost certain to; or determined to
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 13
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
bound together
It's not an accident-that's what I say. It's part and parcel of the whole business. It's all bound up together.
bound = connected (each influences the other)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of bound means:
held together (connected or united) or wrapped
The exact meaning of this sense of bound is subject to its context. For example:
  • "The pages of the book are bound with glue." — held together physically
  • "The book is bound in leather." — wrapped or covered
  • "The United States and England are bound together by a common language." — connected or united (tied together metaphorically)
  • "She cleaned the wound and bound it with fresh bandages." — wrapped
  • "She is wheelchair-bound." — connected (moves with a wheelchair because she is unable to walk)
  • "The jacket has bound buttonholes." — edges wrapped by fabric or trim rather than stitches
  • "She's the one in the bound-edge hat." — where the edge of the hat is wrapped in a decorative material.
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library13 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 6
Web Links
brusque
1 use
Dr. Annstrong stood up. He said brusquely: "No, a man doesn't die of a mere choking fit. Marston's death wasn't what we call a natural death."
brusquely = abruptly (suddenly and quickly — without taking the time to be friendly)
DefinitionGenerally brusque means:
abrupt (sudden and quick — without taking the time to be friendly)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 5
Web Links
caustic
1 use
Mr. Justice Wargrave, mellowed by the excellent port, was being amusing in a caustic fashion, Dr. Armstrong and Tony Marston were listening to him.
caustic = sarcastic
DefinitionGenerally caustic means:
of a chemical substance:  corrosive; capable of destroying or eating away such as a strong acid

or:

of a person:  sarcastic, critical, or harsh
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 3
Web Links
deference
1 use
He said now in a low deferential voice:
deferential = politely respectful
DefinitionGenerally deference means:
polite respect — often when submitting to another's wishes
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
dubious
2 uses
He said dubiously:
dubiously = doubtfully
DefinitionGenerally dubious means:
doubtful
in various senses, including:
  • doubtful that something should be relied upon — as in "The argument relies on a dubious assumption."
  • doubtful that something is morally proper — as in "The company is accused of using dubious sales practices to influence minors."
  • bad or of questionable value — as in "The state has the dubious distinction of the highest taxes."
  • doubtful or uncertain — as in "She is dubious about making the change."
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 8
Web Links
furtive
2 uses
A soft furtive footfall...
furtive = quietly cautious
DefinitionGenerally furtive means:
taking pains to avoid being observed

or:

in a manner indicating nervousness (being cautious or appearing suspicious)
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 8
Web Links
implication
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
Her implication in the crime
He was implicated in that share-pushing fraud of Bennito's three years ago-we're sure of that though we can't prove it.
implicated = involved or accused of involvement
DefinitionGenerally this sense of implication means:
involvement in or the suggestion that someone was involved in something — especially a crime
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 9
Web Links
induce
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
induce her to
Amongst other things he was a dope pedlar and he was responsible for inducing the daughter of friends of mine to take to drugs.
inducing = persuading
DefinitionGenerally this sense of induce means:
to persuade somebody to do something
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 16
Web Links
iniquity
1 use
It's iniquitous!
iniquitous = immoral or unjust
DefinitionGenerally iniquity means:
immorality; or an immoral act
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
laconic
1 use
Philip Lombard said laconically: "It might be."
laconically = using few words
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 11
Web Links
malevolent
2 uses
Mr. Justice Wargrave looked at him with active malevolence.
malevolence = wishing evil to others
DefinitionGenerally malevolent means:
evil
  • of a person — wishing or appearing to wish evil to others
  • of a thing — exerting an evil or harmful influence
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
reproach
3 uses
There was no self-reproach, no uneasiness in those eyes.
reproach = criticism
DefinitionGenerally reproach means:
a criticism; or to express criticism
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
sagacious
1 use
For all his sagacity, for all his caution and astuteness, the old judge had gone the way of the rest.
sagacity = wisdom
DefinitionGenerally sagacious means:
wise — especially through long experience and thoughtfulness
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 14
Web Links
scrupulous
2 uses
I have always been strictly just and scrupulous in my summing up of a case.
scrupulous = careful to behave ethically
DefinitionGenerally scrupulous means:
careful to behave ethically and/or diligently (with great care and attention to detail)
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 16
Web Links
sheer   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 6 uses
1  —4 uses as in:
sheer fun
May be sheer moonshine-just plain lunacy!
sheer = pure
DefinitionGenerally this sense of sheer means:
complete or pure — without restriction,  qualification, or other elements (used for emphasis)
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 7
Web Links
2  —2 uses as in:
a sheer cliff
...the cliffs fell sheer to the sea below,
sheer = steeply
DefinitionGenerally this sense of sheer means:
so steep it is almost vertical
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 8
Web Links
shrewd
5 uses
Always looked half asleep, but was shrewd as could be when it came to a point of law.
shrewd = smart
DefinitionGenerally shrewd means:
smart — especially in negotiating with people (may infer underhanded dealings)
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 9
Web Links
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