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And Then There Were None

Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

instructions
accompany
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
law and accompanying regulations
The letter he had received had been rather vague in its terms, but there was nothing vague about the accompanying cheque.
accompanying = coming at the same time
From page 11.5  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of accompany means:
complement (to provide with something else to make it whole or better)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library9 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 10
1st useChapter 1, p.11.5
Web Links
acquiesce
2 uses
She is vaguely sleepy and acquiescent.
acquiescent = inclined to comply
From page 143.6  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally acquiesce means:
reluctant or unenthusiastic compliance, consent, or agreement
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 9, p.143.6
Web Links
acute
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
acute sense of smell
He was conscious of the judge's acute logical brain.
acute = sharp and perceptive
From page 102.4  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of acute means:
sharp (highly perceptive in some area or mentally sharp)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 7, p.102.4
Web Links
cardiac
3 uses
Young healthy subject-no cardiac weakness.
cardiac = heart
From page 200.9  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally cardiac means:
of or relating to the heart
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 6, p.89.5
Web Links
concur
3 uses
All his suspicions were directed against Lombard and I pretended to concur in these.
concur = agree
From page 269.7  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of concur means:
to agree
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4, p.59.2
Web Links
condone
2 uses
I'm glad to say they did not condone her behaviour.
condone = approve or accept
From page 100.9  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally condone means:
accept without criticism; or approve of
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 7, p.100.9
Web Links
disparage
1 use
  "You've seen a bit of the world, I fancy?"
  Lombard shrugged his shoulders disparagingly.
  "I've knocked about here and there, sir."
disparagingly = making it seem unimportant

(editor's note:  The word, disparage, is frequently used to describe someone belittling someone else. But in this case, it is used to describe someone being modest.)
From page 22.1  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally disparage means:
to criticize or make seem less important — especially in a disrespectful or contemptuous manner
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 2, p.22.1
Web Links
dispassionate
2 uses
It was the dispassionate stare of a man well used to weighing humanity in the balance.
dispassionate = unaffected by emotion or bias

(editor's note:  This refers to Judge Walgrave as he looked at Vera.)
From page 138.9  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally dispassionate means:
unaffected by strong emotion or bias
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2, p.25.9
Web Links
exonerate
3 uses
But I quite appreciate the fact that we are all strangers to one another and that in those circumstances, nobody can be exonerated without the fullest proof.
exonerated = found free of blame
From page 139.6  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally exonerate means:
to free someone from blame

or more rarely:

to free someone from an obligation
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4, p.60.4
Web Links
feasible
1 use
He said: "It's perfectly feasible-taken alone."
feasible = possible or believable
From page 103.2  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally feasible means:
possible or practical
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 7, p.103.2
Web Links
ferret out
2 uses
This island's more or less a bare rock. We shall make short work of searching it. We'll soon ferret out U. N. Owen, Esq.
ferret out = search and discover through persistent investigation
From page 108.5  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally ferret out means:
search for and discover through persistent investigation
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4, p.67.5
Web Links
fraught
2 uses
The judge said: "There are five of us here in this room. One of us is a murderer. The position is fraught with grave danger."
fraught = filled
From page 185.5  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally fraught means:
full of negative things; or marked by or causing distress
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 6, p.89.9
Web Links
inquest
4 uses
Was that why he had gone off after the inquest so hurriedly?
inquest = formal investigation

(editor's note:  This is Vera recalling Hugo's actions.)
From page 209.5  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally inquest means:
a formal inquiry or investigation — typically into the cause of an undesirable event — often an investigation of an unexpected death
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1, p.4.5
Web Links
juncture
2 uses
At this juncture, Armstrong felt what was needed was a man of action.
juncture = important point in time
From page 102.5  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally juncture means:
where things come together — especially a point in time with a critical event
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 7, p.102.5
Web Links
perjury
4 uses
What about your own pretty little spot of perjury?
perjury = making false statements
From page 127.5  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally perjury means:
the criminal offense of telling lies after formally promising to tell the truth — such as when testifying in a court trial
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 9, p.127.5
Web Links
purport
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
Her ex-husband purports that...
I received a letter with a signature that was not very easy to read. It purported to be from a woman I had met at a certain summer resort two or three years ago.
purported = claimed
From page 52.9  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of purport means:
to claim — (often said of something that is not easy to believe or is not true)
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3, p.52.9
Web Links
sedative
5 uses
The sedative that the doctor has given her begins to take effect.
sedative = drug that puts to sleep
From page 143.5  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally sedative means:
a drug that calms or puts to sleep; or describing something as calming
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3, p.50.5
Web Links
self-righteous
2 uses
There was no self-reproach, no uneasiness in those eyes. They were hard and self-righteous.
self-righteous = convinced of personal moral superiority

(editor's notes:  This is in reference to Emily Brent who immediately fired and kicked out of her home the unmarried servant who became pregnant. "No self-reproach" means Brent did not in any way blame herself for contributing to the problems that led the girl to commit suicide.)
From page 101.8  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally self-righteous means:
believing oneself morally superior to others — especially in an annoying manner
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 7, p.101.8
Web Links
solicitous
2 uses
Notice how her husband hung over her as she was coming round. Not all husbandly solicitude!
solicitude = care or concern for someone

(editor's note:  This is when Blore suggests that Mr. Rogers was concerned about what his wife might say rather than being concerned about her well-being.)
From page 91  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally solicitous means:
showing care or concern for someone
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 6, p.91
Web Links
stolid
3 uses
  "Ten people dead on an island and not a living soul on it. It doesn't make sense!"
  Inspector Maine said stolidly: "Nevertheless, it happened, sir."
stolidly = unemotionally
From page 247.4  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally stolid means:
having or revealing little emotion — sometimes indicating qualities of not changing or being dependable

or (much more rarely):

of an object:  not interesting — often large and unmoving
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 15, p.224.2
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