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And Then There Were None

Extra Credit Words with Typical Sample Sentences

instructions
accompany
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
law and accompanying regulations
The trend is easily seen in the accompanying graph.
accompanying = provided together to be complete
DefinitionGenerally this sense of accompany means:
complement (to provide with something else to make it whole or better)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library9 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 10
1st useChapter 1, p.11.5
Web Links
acquiesce
2 uses
She is opposed, but will ultimately acquiesce to the will of the majority.
acquiesce = reluctantly accept
DefinitionGenerally acquiesce means:
reluctant or unenthusiastic compliance, consent, or agreement
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 9, p.143.6
Web Links
acute
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
acute sense of smell
Dogs have an acute sense of smell.
acute = excellent (highly perceptive)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of acute means:
sharp (highly perceptive in some area or mentally sharp)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 7, p.102.4
Web Links
cardiac
3 uses
She is in the cardiac care unit.
cardiac = heart
DefinitionGenerally cardiac means:
of or relating to the heart
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 6, p.89.5
Web Links
concur
3 uses
We concur on the action to be taken; though we disagree on the reasons.
concur = agree
DefinitionGenerally this sense of concur means:
to agree
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4, p.59.2
Web Links
condone
2 uses
Such behavior is permitted, but we certainly don't condone it.
condone = accept without criticism; or approve of
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 7, p.100.9
Web Links
disparage
1 use
She has a reputation for disparaging the efforts of her co-workers.
disparaging = criticizing or making seem less important
DefinitionGenerally disparage means:
to criticize or make seem less important — especially in a disrespectful or contemptuous manner
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 2, p.22.1
Web Links
dispassionate
2 uses
She has a reputation as a dispassionate judge.
dispassionate = unaffected by strong emotion or bias
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2, p.25.9
Web Links
exonerate
3 uses
The jury exonerated her of all charges.
exonerated = freed (of blame)
DefinitionGenerally exonerate means:
to free someone from blame

or more rarely:

to free someone from an obligation
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4, p.60.4
Web Links
feasible
1 use
Her plan sounds feasible.
feasible = possible or practical
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 7, p.103.2
Web Links
ferret out
2 uses
She ferreted out the truth.
ferreted out = searched for and discovered through persistent investigation
DefinitionGenerally ferret out means:
search for and discover through persistent investigation
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4, p.67.5
Web Links
fraught
2 uses
The week following the diagnosis was fraught with difficult choices.
fraught = filled (with something negative)
DefinitionGenerally fraught means:
full of negative things; or marked by or causing distress
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 6, p.89.9
Web Links
inquest
4 uses
The coroner's inquest ruled the death a homicide.
inquest = formal inquiry or investigation
DefinitionGenerally inquest means:
a formal inquiry or investigation — typically into the cause of an undesirable event — often an investigation of an unexpected death
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1, p.4.5
Web Links
juncture
2 uses
At such junctures she always had an impulse to leave.
junctures = points in time and circumstances
DefinitionGenerally juncture means:
where things come together — especially a point in time with a critical event
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 7, p.102.5
Web Links
perjury
4 uses
She was not found guilty of the theft, but was found guilty of perjury during her testimony to the grand jury.
perjury = the criminal offense of telling lies in court after formally promising to tell the truth
DefinitionGenerally perjury means:
the criminal offense of telling lies after formally promising to tell the truth — such as when testifying in a court trial
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 9, p.127.5
Web Links
purport
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
Her ex-husband purports that...
Even among the people who purport to understand the technology there is wide disagreement about its ramifications.
purport = claim
DefinitionGenerally this sense of purport means:
to claim — (often said of something that is not easy to believe or is not true)
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3, p.52.9
Web Links
sedative
5 uses
She gave him a sedative to help him sleep.
sedative = a drug that calms or puts to sleep
DefinitionGenerally sedative means:
a drug that calms or puts to sleep; or describing something as calming
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3, p.50.5
Web Links
self-righteous
2 uses
She is self-righteous, seeing minor flaws in her friends while ignorant of her own major shortcomings.
self-righteous = convinced of personal moral superiority over others
DefinitionGenerally self-righteous means:
believing oneself morally superior to others — especially in an annoying manner
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 7, p.101.8
Web Links
solicitous
2 uses
It's a mid-price hotel in a great location with a solicitous staff.
solicitous = showing great care or concern for someone (in this case, for guests)
DefinitionGenerally solicitous means:
showing care or concern for someone
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 6, p.91
Web Links
stolid
3 uses
She listened to both arguments thoughtfully, but with a face as stolid as a cow's.
stolid = emotionless
DefinitionGenerally stolid means:
having or revealing little emotion — sometimes indicating qualities of not changing or being dependable

or (much more rarely):

of an object:  not interesting — often large and unmoving
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 15, p.224.2
Web Links
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