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Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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acquit
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
she acquitted herself well
She was not abnormally deficient, and she mustered learning enough to acquit herself respectably in conversation with her contemporaries, among whom it must be avowed, however, that she occupied a secondary place.†
acquit = handle (conduct or behave)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of acquit means:
to handle oneself in a specified way — which is typically in a positive way
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
acrimony
2 uses
Aunt Penniman, however, took no account of it; she spoke even with a touch of acrimony.
acrimony = anger or bitterness
DefinitionGenerally acrimony means:
anger—often accompanied by bitterness
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 28
Web Links
aesthetic
1 use
To visit one's lover, with tears and reproaches, at his own residence, was an image so agreeable to Mrs. Penniman's mind that she felt a sort of aesthetic disappointment at its lacking, in this case, the harmonious accompaniments of darkness and storm.
aesthetic = related to beauty (in this case, the beauty of a situation completely as one might imagine it)
DefinitionGenerally aesthetic means:
related to beauty or good taste — often referring to one's appreciation of beauty or one's sense of what is beautiful

or:

beautiful or tasteful
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 30
Web Links
agitate
8 uses
Catherine was always agitated by an introduction;
agitated = emotionally stirred up (probably made anxious)
DefinitionGenerally agitate means:
to stir up or shake — emotionally (as when people are angered or upset) or physically (as when a washing machine cleans clothes)
Word Statistics
Book8 uses
Library16 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 7
Web Links
apparent
10 uses
Catherine came and opened it; she was apparently very quiet.
apparently = obviously
DefinitionGenerally apparent means:
clear or obvious; or appearing as such but not necessarily so
Word Statistics
Book10 uses
Library66 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 14
Web Links
benevolent
1 use
a benevolent attempt to confer a distinction upon a young woman
benevolent = kind
DefinitionGenerally benevolent means:
kind, generous, or charitable
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 15
Web Links
defer
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
deferred the decision
I will defer the telling.
defer = postpone (tell at a later time)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of defer means:
delay or postpone (hold off until a later time)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
deride
1 use
Morris had swallowed his pride and made the effort necessary to cross the threshold of her too derisive parent
derisive = treating him as inferior and unworthy of respect

(editor's note:  The suffix "-ive" converts a word into an adjective; though over time, what was originally an adjective often comes to be used as a noun. The adjective pattern means tending to and is seen in words like attractive, impressive, and supportive. Examples of the noun include narrative, alternative, and detective.)
DefinitionGenerally deride means:
to criticize with strong disrespect — often
with humor
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 10
Web Links
direct
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
was direct in my instructions
It was not in his manner to obtain information by indirect methods, and it never even occurred to him to question the servants.†
indirect = not straightforward (complicated)

(Editor's note:  The prefix "in-" in indirect means not and reverses the meaning of direct. This is the same pattern you see in words like invisible, incomplete, and insecure.)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of direct means:
straightforward (uncomplicated or simple — perhaps also indicating openness and honesty)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library13 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 8
Web Links
dissent
1 use
From this assertion Mrs. Penniman saw no reason to dissent
dissent = disagree
DefinitionGenerally dissent means:
to disagree; or disagreement or conflict — typically between people who cooperate, and often with official or majority beliefs
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
earnest
9 uses
Is he in earnest about Catherine, then?
in earnest = serious
DefinitionGenerally earnest means:
characterized by sincere belief

or:

intensely or excessively serious
Word Statistics
Book9 uses
Library19 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 11
Web Links
efface
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
efface the memory
She is like a copper kettle that receives a dent; you may polish up the kettle, but you can't efface the mark."†
efface = remove completely from recognition or memory
DefinitionGenerally this sense of efface means:
remove completely from recognition or memory — sometimes by erasing
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 21
Web Links
establish
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
establish a positive tone
Her father would care equally little whether Morris were established in business or transported for life.†
established = settled
DefinitionGenerally this sense of establish means:
create, start, or set in [a] place
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library25 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 25
Web Links
expedient
1 use
She wondered that this simple expedient had never occurred to her before.
expedient = an action that is speedy or practical
DefinitionGenerally expedient means:
a practical action — especially one that accepts negative tradeoffs due to circumstances

or:

convenient, speedy, or practical
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 28
Web Links
however   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 58 uses
1  —57 uses as in:
However, complications may...
He had not spoken, however, and at last she faced about.†
however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
DefinitionGenerally this sense of however means:
though (or another expression that connects contrasting ideas)

(Based on idea 1 we might not expect idea 2, but this is a way of saying that even though idea 1 exists, we still have idea 2.  Synonyms include in spite of that, , nevertheless, nonetheless, on the other hand, in contrastand but.)
Word Statistics
Book57 uses
Library61 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
However much she tried...
But the principal thing that we know about this young man—who is, indeed, very intelligent—leads us to suppose that, however much he may value your personal merits, he values your money more.†
however = regardless of how
DefinitionGenerally this sense of however means:
to whatever degree (regardless of how much; or whatever unspecified amount)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 11
Web Links
indifferent
4 uses
I have not been in the least indifferent.
indifferent = without interest
DefinitionGenerally indifferent means:
without interest
in various senses, including:
  • unconcerned — as in "She is indifferent to what is served to eat."
  • unsympathetic — as in "She is indifferent to his needs."
  • not of good quality (which may imply average or poor quality depending upon context) — as in "an indifferent performance"
  • impartial — as in "We need a judge who is indifferent."
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library15 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 22
Web Links
inquire
14 uses
"My dear Austin," she then inquired, "do you think it is better to be clever than to be good?"
inquired = asked
DefinitionGenerally inquire means:
to ask about or look into something
Word Statistics
Book14 uses
Library19 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
reticent
1 use
a good deal of mysterious reticence on Mrs. Penniman's part.
reticence = reluctance to speak freely
DefinitionGenerally reticent means:
reluctant — especially to speak freely
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 31
Web Links
speculative
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
a speculative theory
Morris had a speculative idea that she had a little property; but he naturally did not press this.
speculative = an unproven thought
DefinitionGenerally this sense of speculative means:
based on thought or theory that is unproven or unprovable
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 21
Web Links
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Sample usage followed by this mark was not checked by an editor. Please let us know if you spot a problem.
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