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Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

Top-Ranked Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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approach   (3 meanings)
3 meanings, 5 uses
1  —3 uses as in:
approached the city
He paused and put his hand to his throat, and I could see, in spite of his collected manner, that he was wrestling against the approaches of the hysteria—†
approaches = coming
From page 78.1  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of approach means:
to get closer to (near in space, time, quantity, or quality)
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library104 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 10, p.92.1
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
use the best approach
Had I approached my discovery in a more noble spirit, had I risked the experiment while under the empire of generous or pious aspirations, all must have been otherwise, and from these agonies of death and birth, I had come forth an angel instead of a fiend.†
approached = handled (done something in a particular manner)
From page 89  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of approach means:
a way of doing something; or a route that leads to a particular place
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 10, p.89
Web Links
3  —1 use as in:
approached her with the proposal
He gave his friend a few seconds to recover his composure, and then approached the question he had come to put.†
approached = began talking about
From page 14.4  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of approach means:
to begin communication with someone about something — often a proposal or a delicate topic
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2, p.14.4
Web Links
austere
1 use
He was austere with himself ... and though he enjoyed the theatre, had not crossed the doors of one for twenty years.
austere = strict in not enjoying luxury
From page 1.6  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally austere means:
a notable absence of luxury, comfort, or decoration

or:

of a person:  stern in manner; or practicing great self-denial
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 1, p.1.6
Web Links
condone
1 use
punishment coming, PEDE CLAUDO, years after memory has forgotten and self-love condoned the fault.
condoned = accepted without criticism
From page 22.4  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally condone means:
accept without criticism; or approve of
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 2, p.22.4
Web Links
consequence   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 3 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
a direct consequence of
"Foul play!" cried the lawyer, a good deal frightened and rather inclined to be irritated in consequence.†
consequence = result
From page 52.5  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of consequence means:
a result of something (often an undesired side effect)
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library28 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 1, p.7.8
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
of little consequence
I met with one accident which, as it brought on no consequence, I shall no more than mention.†
consequence = significant result
From page 92.2  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of consequence means:
importance or relevance
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 10, p.92.2
Web Links
contrast
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
contrast their writing styles
Even on Sunday, when it veiled its more florid charms and lay comparatively empty of passage, the street shone out in contrast to its dingy neighbourhood, like a fire in a forest; and with its freshly painted shutters, well-polished brasses, and general cleanliness and gaiety of note, instantly caught and pleased the eye of the passenger.
in contrast = in a comparison that shows differences
From page 3.5  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of contrast means:
point to differences between; or compare to show differences
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 1, p.3.5
Web Links
countenance
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
a pleasant countenance
...a man of a rugged countenance, that was never lighted by a smile;
countenance = face; or facial expression
From page 1.1  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of countenance means:
facial expression; or face; or composure or manner
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1, p.1.1
Web Links
explicit
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
explicit instructions
"Now, my good man," said the lawyer, "be explicit."†
explicit = clear and detailed
From page 51.8  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of explicit means:
clear and with enough detail so there is no confusion
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 8, p.51.8
Web Links
inclined
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
I'm inclined to
inclined to be irritated
inclined = having a tendency
From page 52.4  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of inclined means:
a tendency, mood, desire, or attitude that favors something; or making someone favor something
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library10 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 8, p.52.4
Web Links
penitent
4 uses
As for the moral turpitude that man unveiled to me, even with tears of penitence, I cannot, even in memory, dwell on it without a start of horror.
penitence = feeling or expressing remorse for misdeeds (sorrow for having done wrong); or a person who does such
From page 81.2  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally penitent means:
feeling or expressing sorrow for having done wrong; or a person who does such
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 9, p.81.2
Web Links
phenomenon
1 use
He had now seen the full deformity of that creature that shared with him some of the phenomena of consciousness, and was co-heir with him to death: and beyond these links of community, which in themselves made the most poignant part of his distress, he thought of Hyde, for all his energy of life, as of something not only hellish but inorganic.†
phenomena = observable things
From page 105.9  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally phenomenon means:
something that exists or happened — especially something of special interest — sometimes someone or something that is extraordinary
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 10, p.105.9
Web Links
pious
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
a good, pious woman
There were several books on a shelf; one lay beside the tea-things open, and Utterson was amazed to find it a copy of a pious work, for which Jekyll had several times expressed a great esteem, annotated, in his own hand, with startling blasphemies.
pious = religious or moral
From page 66.6  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of pious means:
religious or highly moral
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 8, p.66.6
Web Links
profound
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
profound sadness
profound slumber
profound = intense (deep)
From page 104.4  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of profound means:
of greatest intensity or emotional depth
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 10, p.104.4
Web Links
reputable
3 uses
A FORTNIGHT later, by excellent good fortune, the doctor gave one of his pleasant dinners to some five or six old cronies, all intelligent, reputable men and all judges of good wine; and Mr. Utterson so contrived that he remained behind after the others had departed.
reputable = respected (with good reputation)
From page 24.2  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally reputable means:
trusted and respected (having a good reputation)
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 6, p.42.3
Web Links
stature
5 uses
It might indeed be possible to cover my face; but of what use was that, when I was unable to conceal the alteration in my stature?
stature = height
From page 94.2  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally stature means:
a person's height

or:

a high level of respect gained by impressive achievement
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4, p.31.4
Web Links
thoroughfare
3 uses
He walked fast, hunted by his fears, chattering to himself, skulking through the less-frequented thoroughfares, counting the minutes that still divided him from midnight.†
thoroughfares = roads
From page 103.9  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally thoroughfare means:
a road — typically a main road, but potentially any road, path, or means of getting from one place to another
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 10, p.103.9
Web Links
trifle   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 5 uses
1  —3 uses as in:
a trifling matter
"Yes, certainly, I know that," said the doctor, a trifle sharply.
trifle = little
From page 25.7  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of trifle means:
something of small importance; or a small quantity
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4, p.29.5
Web Links
2  —2 uses as in:
trifle with her affections
Confident as I am that you will not trifle with this appeal, my heart sinks and my hand trembles at the bare thought of such a possibility.
trifle with = treat thoughtlessly or without respect
From page 72.6  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of trifle with means:
to treat somebody or something thoughtlessly or without respect
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 9, p.72.6
Web Links
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