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Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

instructions
acquiesce
1 use
no one has ever suffered such torments ... and yet even to these, habit brought ... a certain callousness of soul, a certain acquiescence of despair;
acquiescence = reluctant acceptance
From page 107.3  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally acquiesce means:
reluctant or unenthusiastic compliance, consent, or agreement
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 10, p.107.3
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alleviate
1 use
habit brought—no, not alleviation—but a certain callousness of soul, a certain acquiescence of despair;
alleviation = lessening of pain

(editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
From page 107.3  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally alleviate means:
to lessen something that is bad — especially to lessen pain
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 10, p.107.3
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aversion
1 use
Even at that time, I had not yet conquered my aversion to the dryness of a life of study.
aversion = dislike that leads to avoidance
From page 89.7  Typical Usage
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 10, p.89.7
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blasphemy
2 uses
a pious work, for which Jekyll had several times expressed a great esteem, annotated, in his own hand, with startling blasphemies.
blasphemies = something said disrespectful of something considered sacred
From page 66.7  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally blasphemy means:
something said or done that is disrespectful of something considered sacred — especially God or religion
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 8, p.66.7
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blatant
1 use
Oh, I know he's a good fellow—you needn't frown—an excellent fellow, and I always mean to see more of him; but a hide-bound pedant for all that; an ignorant, blatant pedant.
blatant = (of bad behavior) obvious without any attempt at hiding it
From page 25.5  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally blatant means:
obvious — often without any attempt to hide bad behavior
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3, p.25.5
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depravity
1 use
When I would come back from these excursions, I was often plunged into a kind of wonder at my vicarious depravity.
depravity = immorality

(editor's note:  Vicarious means experienced secondhand, so the last three words could be paraphrased as "my enjoyment at having seen such immoral behavior.")
From page 91.5  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally depravity means:
complete immorality or evilness
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 10, p.91.5
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deride
1 use
And now, you who have so long been bound to the most narrow and material views, you who have denied the virtue of transcendental medicine, you who have derided your superiors— behold!
derided = laughed at or made fun of—while showing a lack of respect
From page 80.2  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally deride means:
to criticize with strong disrespect — often
with humor
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 9, p.80.2
Web Links
despondent
1 use
His terror of the gallows drove him continually to commit temporary suicide, and return to his subordinate station of a part instead of a person; but he loathed the necessity, he loathed the despondency into which Jekyll was now fallen, and he resented the dislike with which he was himself regarded.
despondency = depression
From page 106.7  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally despondent means:
emotionally depressed — especially a feeling of grief and hopelessness after a loss
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 10, p.106.7
Web Links
duplicity
1 use
when I reached years of reflection, and began to look round me and take stock of my progress and position in the world, I stood already committed to a profound duplicity of life.
duplicity = deception — such as lying
From page 82.8  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally duplicity means:
deception (lying to or misleading others) — usually over an extended period
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 10, p.82.8
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eccentric
1 use
The first was a will, drawn in the same eccentric terms as the one which he had returned six months before,
eccentric = unconventional or strange
From page 67.5  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally eccentric means:
unconventional or strange; or a person with such traits
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 8, p.67.5
Web Links
enigma
1 use
you speak enigmas
enigmas = things that are mysterious and seem unexplainable
From page 79.8  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally enigma means:
something mysterious that seems unexplainable
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 9, p.79.8
Web Links
gesticulate
1 use
This was the shocking thing; that the slime of the pit seemed to utter cries and voices; that the amorphous dust gesticulated and sinned; that what was dead, and had no shape, should usurp the offices of life.
gesticulated = made body movements
From page 106.2  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally gesticulate means:
to make gestures (hand or body movements) while speaking or to express something
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 10, p.106.2
Web Links
heresy
2 uses
"I incline to Cain's heresy," he used to say quaintly: "I let my brother go to the devil in his own way."
heresy = opinions or actions most people consider immoral

(editor's note:  Wikisource annotated this line as follows:  Cain's heresy..In the Biblical story of Cain and Abel, after murdering his brother, God asked Cain where he was. Cain replies, "Am I my brother's keeper?" This was, in fact, the heresy that Utterson refers to. Utterson means that his "sin" is that he doesn't get involved in the personal affairs of others. However, he eventually breaks this rule with Jekyll and Hyde.)
From page 2  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3, p.25.3
Web Links
immodest
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
immodest dress
It offended him both as a lawyer and as a lover of the sane and customary sides of life, to whom the fanciful was the immodest.†
immodest = improper
From page 12.4  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of immodest means:
considered improper — especially too sexually suggestive which is typically said of clothing
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2, p.12.4
Web Links
impending
1 use
Under the strain of this continually-impending doom and by the sleeplessness to which I now condemned myself, ay, even beyond what I had thought possible to man, I became, in my own person, a creature eaten up and emptied by fever, languidly weak both in body and mind, and solely occupied by one thought: the horror of my other self.
impending = about to happen
From page 105.4  Typical Usage
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 10, p.105.4
Web Links
induce
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
induce symptoms
Suppose it were as you suppose, supposing Dr. Jekyll to have been—well, murdered, what could induce the murderer to stay?
induce = cause
From page 56.2  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally this sense of induce means:
to cause something to arise or happen
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 8, p.56.2
Web Links
pedantic
4 uses
But I have been pedantically exact, as you call it.
pedantically = with too much concern for details or book learning
From page 10.5  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally pedantic means:
too concerned with formal rules, details, or book learning
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1, p.10.5
Web Links
poignant
1 use
...and beyond these links of community, which in themselves made the most poignant part of his distress, he thought of Hyde, for all his energy of life, as of something not only hellish but inorganic.
poignant = intense
From page 106.1  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally poignant means:
sharp or intense — typically arousing deep emotion such as sadness, but possibly having or creating a sharp smell, taste, or insight
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 10, p.106.1
Web Links
scrupulous
1 use
I took and furnished that house in Soho, to which Hyde was tracked by the police; and engaged as housekeeper a creature whom I well knew to be silent and unscrupulous.
unscrupulous = not moral

(editor's note:  The prefix "un-" in unscrupulous means not and reverses the meaning of scrupulous. This is the same pattern you see in words like unhappy, unknown, and unlucky.)
From page 90.3  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally scrupulous means:
careful to behave ethically and/or diligently (with great care and attention to detail)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 10, p.90.3
Web Links
stringent
2 uses
but professional honour and faith to his dead friend were stringent obligations;
stringent = demanding
From page 47.2  All Book Uses  Typical Usage
DefinitionGenerally stringent means:
demanding strict attention to detailed rules and procedures
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 6, p.47.2
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Sample usage followed by this mark was not checked by an editor. Please let us know if you spot a problem.
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