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The Adventures of Tom Sawyer

Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

instructions
ailment
1 use
No ailment was found, and he investigated again.
ailment = illness
DefinitionGenerally ailment means:
an illness
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 6
Web Links
alacrity
2 uses
Tom gave up the brush with reluctance in his face, but alacrity in his heart.
alacrity = quickness; and/or cheerful eagerness
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
auspicious
1 use
Everything was auspicious.
auspicious = favorable; or suggestive of good things to come
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 28
Web Links
deride
2 uses
Tom withered him with derision!
derision = by treating him as though he were inferior and unworthy of respect

(editor's note:  The suffix "-sion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in admission from admit, discussion from discuss, and invasion from invade.)
DefinitionGenerally deride means:
to criticize with strong disrespect — often
with humor
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
diffident
1 use
Speak out, my boy—don't be diffident.
diffident = hesitant and unassertive due to a lack of self-confidence
DefinitionGenerally diffident means:
hesitant and unassertive — often due to a lack of self-confidence
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 23
Web Links
diligent
3 uses
Diligence and attention soon gave him the knack of it,
diligence = hard work and care
DefinitionGenerally this sense of diligent means:
hard work and care in tasks — often continuing when others might quit because of difficulties
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
disdain
1 use
His heart was heavy, and he said with a disdain which he did not feel that it wasn't anything to spit like Tom Sawyer;
disdain = a lack of respect
DefinitionGenerally disdain means:
a lack of respect — often suggesting distaste and an undeserved sense of superiority

or:

to reject as not good enough
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 6
Web Links
eloquent
6 uses
The mayor of the village, in delivering the prize to the author of it, made a warm speech in which he said that it was by far the most "eloquent" thing he had ever listened to,
eloquent = powerful use of language
Word Statistics
Book6 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 16
Web Links
forbearance
1 use
He believed he had taxed the forbearance of the powers above to the extremity
forbearance = tolerance

(editor's note: Tom is afraid that he has sinned more than God can forgive)
DefinitionGenerally forbearance means:
refraining (holding back) from acting

or:

patience, tolerance, or self-control
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 22
Web Links
guile
2 uses
Aunt Polly asked him questions that were full of guile... for she wanted to trap him into damaging revealments.
guile = cunning and deceit
DefinitionGenerally guile means:
cunning (shrewdness and cleverness) and deceitful
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
notorious
2 uses
Here was a gorgeous triumph; they were missed; they were mourned... the departed were the talk of the whole town, and the envy of all the boys, as far as this dazzling notoriety was concerned.
notoriety = state of being known for something bad
DefinitionGenerally notorious means:
well known for something bad
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library9 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 14
Web Links
persistent
2 uses
As the service proceeded, the clergyman drew such pictures of the graces, the winning ways, and the rare promise of the lost lads that every soul there, thinking he recognized these pictures, felt a pang in remembering that he had persistently blinded himself to them always before, and had as persistently seen only faults and flaws in the poor boys.
persistently = always (in a continuing manner)
DefinitionGenerally persistent means:
continuing — especially despite difficulties or opposition
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 2000
1st useChapter 17
Web Links
pervasive
3 uses
and this seemed to render the pervading silence and sense of loneliness the more profound.
pervading = filling
DefinitionGenerally pervasive means:
existing throughout something; or generally widespread
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 8
Web Links
pious
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
a good, pious woman
you will find that the sermon of the most frivolous and the least religious girl in the school is always the longest and the most relentlessly pious.
pious = moral and religious
DefinitionGenerally this sense of pious means:
religious or highly moral
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 21
Web Links
profound
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
profound sadness
There was a long silence, profound and unbroken;
profound = of great intensity
DefinitionGenerally this sense of profound means:
of greatest intensity or emotional depth
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 14
Web Links
relapse
3 uses
The next day the doctors were back; Tom had relapsed.
relapsed = returned to an undesirable previous condition
DefinitionGenerally relapse means:
to return to an undesirable previous condition — especially illness, addiction, or bad behavior
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 22
Web Links
sagacious
1 use
She was half sorry her sagacity had miscarried, and half glad that Tom had stumbled into obedient conduct for once.
sagacity = wisdom
DefinitionGenerally sagacious means:
wise — especially through long experience and thoughtfulness
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
succession
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
a succession of events
He took a rest and then swelled himself up and fetched a succession of admirable groans.
succession = series (one after another)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of succession means:
series or sequence (one after another)
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 6
Web Links
tedious
6 uses
Three dreadful days and nights dragged their tedious hours along,
tedious = boring
DefinitionGenerally tedious means:
boring — especially because something goes on too long or without variation
Word Statistics
Book6 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
tranquil
5 uses
Huck's face lost its tranquil content, and took a melancholy cast.
tranquil = calm and undisturbed
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
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