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The Adventures of Tom Sawyer
Vocabulary

Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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alacrity
2 uses
Tom gave up the brush with reluctance in his face, but alacrity in his heart.
alacrity = quickness; and/or cheerful eagerness
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
credulous
1 use
Tom bent down close to it and said, "Lady-bug, lady-bug, fly away home, your house is on fire, your children's alone," and she took wing and went off to see about it —which did not surprise the boy, for he knew of old that this insect was credulous ... and he had practised upon its simplicity more than once.
credulous = gullible (being too willing to believe)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 14
Web Links
deride
2 uses
Tom withered him with derision!
derision = by treating him as though he were inferior and unworthy of respect
DefinitionGenerally deride means:
laugh at or make fun of—while showing a lack of respect
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
diligent
4 uses
Diligence and attention soon gave him the knack of it,
diligence = hard work and care
DefinitionGenerally diligent means:
hard work and care in tasks — often continuing when others might quit because of difficulties
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
discord
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
discordant music
The window went up, a maid-servant's discordant voice profaned the holy calm, and a deluge of water drenched the prone martyr's remains!
discordant = unpleasant sounding
DefinitionGenerally this sense of discord means:
unpleasant sound — especially a combination of sounds that sound wrong together (though sometimes done intentionally in music)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3
Web Links
disdain
1 use
His heart was heavy, and he said with a disdain which he did not feel that it wasn't anything to spit like Tom Sawyer;
disdain = a lack of respect
DefinitionGenerally disdain means:
a lack of respect — often suggesting distaste and an undeserved sense of superiority

or:

to reject as not good enough
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 6
Web Links
eloquent
6 uses
The mayor of the village, in delivering the prize to the author of it, made a warm speech in which he said that it was by far the most "eloquent" thing he had ever listened to,
eloquent = powerful use of language
Word Statistics
Book6 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 16
Web Links
forbearance
1 use
He believed he had taxed the forbearance of the powers above to the extremity
forbearance = tolerance

(editor's note: Tom is afraid that he has sinned more than God can forgive)
DefinitionGenerally forbearance means:
refraining (holding back) from acting

or:

patience, tolerance, or self-control
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 22
Web Links
insipid
1 use
he had to talk so properly that speech ... become insipid in his mouth;
insipid = feeble or lacked flavor
DefinitionGenerally insipid means:
dull (uninteresting and unimpactful)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 35
Web Links
jubilant
4 uses
But although Tom's ear tingled, his heart was jubilant.
jubilant = full of high-spirited delight
DefinitionGenerally jubilant means:
full of happiness and joy — typically because of some triumph or success
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 6
Web Links
magnanimous
1 use
When Becky told her father, in strict confidence, how Tom had taken her whipping at school, the Judge was visibly moved; and when she pleaded grace for the mighty lie which Tom had told in order to shift that whipping from her shoulders to his own, the Judge said with a fine outburst that it was a noble, a generous, a magnanimous lie—a lie that was worthy to hold up its head and march down through history breast to breast with George Washington's lauded Truth about the hatchet!
magnanimous = kind and generous in spirit
DefinitionGenerally magnanimous means:
kind and generous in spirit — especially toward those defeated in battle
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 35
Web Links
notorious
2 uses
Here was a gorgeous triumph; they were missed; they were mourned... the departed were the talk of the whole town, and the envy of all the boys, as far as this dazzling notoriety was concerned.
notoriety = state of being known for something bad
DefinitionGenerally notorious means:
well known for something bad
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 14
Web Links
opulent
1 use
A prevalent feature in these compositions was ... a wasteful and opulent gush of "fine language";
opulent = magnificent
DefinitionGenerally opulent means:
magnificent and luxurious — usually expensive
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 21
Web Links
ostentatious
3 uses
yielded up the pewter medal which he had worn with ostentation for months.
ostentation = an action intended to attract notice and impress others
DefinitionGenerally ostentatious means:
intended to attract notice and impress others — especially with wealth in a vulgar way
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 11
Web Links
persistent
2 uses
As the service proceeded, the clergyman drew such pictures of the graces, the winning ways, and the rare promise of the lost lads that every soul there, thinking he recognized these pictures, felt a pang in remembering that he had persistently blinded himself to them always before, and had as persistently seen only faults and flaws in the poor boys.
persistently = always (in a continuing manner)
DefinitionGenerally persistent means:
continuing — especially despite difficulties or opposition
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 17
Web Links
pervasive
3 uses
and this seemed to render the pervading silence and sense of loneliness the more profound.
pervading = filling
DefinitionGenerally pervasive means:
existing throughout something; or generally widespread
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 8
Web Links
profound
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
profound sadness
There was a long silence, profound and unbroken;
profound = of great intensity
DefinitionGenerally this sense of profound means:
of greatest intensity or emotional depth
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library9 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 14
Web Links
sagacious
1 use
She was half sorry her sagacity had miscarried, and half glad that Tom had stumbled into obedient conduct for once.
sagacity = wisdom
DefinitionGenerally sagacious means:
wise — especially through long experience and thoughtfulness
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
tedious
6 uses
Three dreadful days and nights dragged their tedious hours along,
tedious = boring
DefinitionGenerally tedious means:
boring — especially because something goes on too long or without variation
Word Statistics
Book6 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
tranquil
5 uses
Huck's face lost its tranquil content, and took a melancholy cast.
tranquil = calm and undisturbed
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
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