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The Hound of the Baskervilles
Vocabulary

Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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amiable
5 uses
an elderly gentleman of a very amiable disposition
amiable = friendly and kindly
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
audacious
4 uses
It's the man himself, by all that's wonderful and audacious!
audacious = bold and daring
DefinitionGenerally audacious means:
bold and daring (inclined to take risks) — especially in violating social convention in a manner that could offend others
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 5
Web Links
austere
1 use
I looked back at the platform when we had left it far behind, and saw the tall, austere figure of Holmes standing motionless and gazing after us.
austere = stern
DefinitionGenerally austere means:
a notable absence of luxury, comfort, or decoration

or:

of a person:  stern in manner; or practicing great self-denial
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 6
Web Links
benevolent
2 uses
I have not finally made up my mind whether it is a benevolent or a malevolent agency which is in touch with us
benevolent = kind or good
DefinitionGenerally benevolent means:
kind, generous, or charitable
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
conjecture
4 uses
He knew our number, knew that Sir Henry Baskerville had consulted me, spotted who I was in Regent Street, conjectured that I had got the number of the cab and would lay my hands on the driver
conjectured = concluded based on inconclusive evidence
DefinitionGenerally conjecture means:
a conclusion or opinion based on inconclusive evidence; or the act of forming of such a conclusion or opinion
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 5
Web Links
contrast
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
there is a contrast
There could not have been a greater contrast between brother and sister, for Stapleton was neutral tinted, with light hair and gray eyes, while she was darker than any brunette whom I have seen in England—slim, elegant, and tall.
contrast = difference
DefinitionGenerally this sense of contrast means:
a difference — especially a notable difference; or the side-x-side arrangement of things that draws attention to an unmissable difference
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 7
Web Links
daunt
2 uses
A dim line of ancestors, in every variety of dress, from the Elizabethan knight to the buck of the Regency, stared down upon us and daunted us by their silent company.
daunted = discouraged or intimidated
DefinitionGenerally daunt means:
to discourage or intimidate

(editor's note: The root word is most commonly seen as the adjective daunting which describes something as "discouraging or intimidating". Note that the "-less" suffix means without, so dauntless is to daunt as hopeless is to hope and careless is to care.)
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
discern
3 uses
I seemed to discern some signs of emotion upon the butler's white face.
discern = to see something that is not obvious
DefinitionGenerally discern means:
to notice or understand something — often something that is not obvious
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3
Web Links
efface
1 use
The fresh beauty of the following morning did something to efface from our minds the grim and gray impression which had been left upon both of us by our first experience of Baskerville Hall.
efface = remove (or erase)
DefinitionGenerally efface means:
remove completely from recognition or memory — sometimes by erasing

or:

to make oneself inconspicuous or unimportant
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 7
Web Links
expedient
2 uses
she adopted the expedient of cutting out the words which would form the message, and addressing the letter in a disguised hand.
expedient = practical action
DefinitionGenerally expedient means:
a practical action — especially one that accepts negative tradeoffs due to circumstances

or:

convenient, speedy, or practical
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
furtive
2 uses
He looked round him with a furtive and stealthy air, as one who dreads pursuit.
furtive = cautious
DefinitionGenerally furtive means:
taking pains to avoid being observed

or:

in a manner indicating nervousness (being cautious or appearing suspicious)
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 8
Web Links
incessant
2 uses
He spoke unconcernedly, but his small light eyes glanced incessantly from the girl to me.
incessantly = continuously
DefinitionGenerally incessant means:
continuous — often in an annoying way
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 7
Web Links
mitigate
2 uses
The man was a danger to the community, an unmitigated scoundrel for whom there was neither pity nor excuse.
unmitigated = complete (not diminished) — usually used to say that something that is harmful or unpleasant is not in any way made less bad
DefinitionGenerally mitigate means:
make less harmful or unpleasant
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 9
Web Links
negative
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
had a negative effect
I have made some inquiries myself in the last few days, but the results have, I fear, been negative.†
negative = unsuccessful
DefinitionGenerally this sense of negative means:
bad or harmful
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 6
Web Links
passage
1 use
"Surely your memory deceives you," said I. "I could even quote a passage of your letter."†
passage = a short part
DefinitionGenerally this sense of passage means:
a short part of a longer written work
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 11
Web Links
propitious
1 use
Sir Henry had numerous papers to examine after breakfast, so that the time was propitious for my excursion.
propitious = favorable
DefinitionGenerally propitious means:
favorable (circumstances suggesting good things to come)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 7
Web Links
prosaic
2 uses
Had the prosaic finding of the coroner not finally put an end to the romantic stories which have been whispered in connection with the affair, it might have been difficult to find a tenant for Baskerville Hall.
prosaic = lacking anything unusual, interesting, or challenging
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
pugnacious
1 use
The latter was a small, alert, dark-eyed man about thirty years of age, very sturdily built, with thick black eyebrows and a strong, pugnacious face.
pugnacious = seemingly combative (as though ready to fight)
DefinitionGenerally pugnacious means:
combative in tone (as though ready to fight)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
specious
1 use
He then, by a specious argument, prevented her from going, and so had the chance for which he had waited.
specious = insincere, but seemingly good
DefinitionGenerally specious means:
seemingly good, but without merit

or:

insincere, but seemingly good
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 15
Web Links
tenacious
2 uses
knowing your admirable tenacity I was convinced that you were sitting in ambush, a weapon within reach, waiting for the tenant to return.
tenacity = determination and persistence
DefinitionGenerally tenacious means:
persistent and unyielding
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 14
Web Links
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Sample usage followed by this mark was not checked by an editor. Please let us know if you spot a problem.
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